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Dell Owned and Operated Manufacturing Plants in Brazil, China, India,

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COMMUNICATION: ADVERTISING COMPENDIUM (C.A.C.)

CHAPTER 1 — INTRODUCTION TO ADVERTISING

CHAPTER OBJECTIVES

1. Discuss the elements of effective advertising.

2. Define advertising and identify its types and roles.

3. Identify the five players in the advertising world.

4. Explain the evolution of the advertising industry and the current issues it faces.

CHAPTER REVIEW

Effectiveness is at the heart of companies’ desire to advertise. Though advertising ultimately aids in the sale of products or services, other factors such as price or lack of distribution may influence purchase decisions. Advertising effectiveness tends to be measured in terms of communication impact such as exposure to a message, awareness of a product, attention, and involvement. Most responses can be categorized as perception (seeing), learning (thinking), persuasion (feeling), or behavior (doing). Effective advertising stems from a combination of carefully planned strategy that connects to audience members on an emotional level and that isolates a need the product fulfills, creative that delivers the strategy, and strong, arresting executions.

Six components comprise the classic definition of advertising. Advertising is a paid nonpersonal communication from an identified sponsor using mass media to persuade or influence an audience.

Advertising can be classified into one of nine types. National consumer or brand advertising focuses on building long-term brand identity, and retail/local advertising strives to move merchandise in a restricted area. Political advertising encourages support of a candidate or idea while directory advertising helps consumers locate outlets for specific purchases. Direct response allows consumers to skip the middleman and purchase products directly from distributors by mail, phone or online. Business-to-business ads are directed...

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