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2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File
2010 Census of Population and Housing
Technical Documentation

Issued August 2011

DPSF/10-4 (RV)

U.S. Department of Commerce

Economics and Statistics Administration

U.S. CENSUS BUREAU

For additional information concerning the files, contact the Customer Liaison and Marketing Services Office, Customer Services Center, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC 20233, or phone 301-763-INFO (4636).

For additional information concerning the technical documentation, contact the Administrative and Customer Services Division, Electronic Products Development Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC 20233, or phone 301-763-8004.

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File
2010 Census of Population and Housing

Issued August 2011

DPSF/10-4 (RV)

Technical Documentation

U.S. Department of Commerce Rebecca M. Blank, Acting Secretary Vacant, Deputy Secretary
Economics and Statistics Administration Rebecca M. Blank, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs
U.S. CENSUS BUREAU Robert M. Groves, Director

SUGGESTED CITATION FILES: 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File— [machine-readable data files]/ prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau, 2011. TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION: 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File— Technical Documentation/ prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau, 2011.

ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS ADMINISTRATION

Economics and Statistics Administration Rebecca M. Blank, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

U.S. CENSUS BUREAU Robert M. Groves, Director Thomas L. Mesenbourg, Deputy Director and Chief Operating Officer Arnold A. Jackson, Associate Director for Decennial Census Howard R. Hogan, Associate Director for Demographic Programs Marilia A. Matos, Associate Director for Field Operations Daniel H. Weinberg, Assistant Director for ACS and Decennial Census

CONTENTS

CHAPTERS 1. Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. How to Use This Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Summary Level Sequence Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Data Dictionary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. 2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data . . . . . . 6. Subject Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. User Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
� 2-1
� 3-1
� 4-1
� 5-1
� 6-1
� 7-1


APPENDIX A. Geographic Terms and Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1

v

Chapter 1. Abstract
CITATION
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Demographic Profile Summary File: Technical Documentation, 2011.

TYPE OF FILE
Summary statistics.

SUBJECT CONTENT
The Demographic Profile Summary File contains 100 percent data asked of all people and about every housing unit on topics such as sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin, household relationship, household type, group quarters population, housing occupancy, and housing tenure.

GEOGRAPHIC CONTENT
The Demographic Profile Summary File is released as individual files for the United States, each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The data items are identical for all files, but the geographic coverage differs. The summary level sequence chart outlines the hierarchical and geographic summaries in their entirety.

USER UPDATES
User updates inform data users about corrections, errata, and related explanatory information. These updates provide information about unique characteristics, changes, and corrections. However, sometimes this information becomes available too late to be reflected in the product or related documentation. User updates are available on the Census Bureau’s Internet site at .

Abstract
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

1-1

Chapter 2.
� How to Use This Product

CONTENTS
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Format and Access Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Hierarchy Primer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Header Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New ANSI Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summary Level Sequence Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Structure and Segmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Note to Users of Microsoft Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figures: 2-1. File Set Structure Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2. Standard Hierarchy of Census Geographic Entities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3. Hierarchy of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Areas 2-4. Geographic Header Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-2 2-2 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-6 2-7

INTRODUCTION
This chapter serves as a guide for data users to both the file and the technical documentation. Novice users trying to understand how to use the documentation and the file should read this chapter first.

DATA FORMAT AND ACCESS TOOLS
Users can access the file information through the American FactFinder on the U.S. Census Bureau’s Web site . Users can utilize their standard software packages to manipulate the data. The data are presented in both fixed-length ASCII and comma-separated ASCII formats, which can be easily imported into other software packages. Flat ASCII files by state are available for download via File Transfer Protocol (FTP) from American FactFinder.

GEOGRAPHIC HIERARCHY PRIMER
The smallest component for all census geography is the block. Figure 2-2 at the end of this chapter provides an example of the various geographic hierarchies used, building from the block. Take some time to review this chart to become familiar with the different hierarchies. Begin reading the schematic from the bottom at the blocks entry. By following the lines, you can see the hierarchy very quickly. For example, follow blocks to block groups to census tracts to counties. This path indicates that census tracts and their sublevels in the hierarchy are uniquely identified within a county and do not cross county boundaries. Follow blocks to the school district hierarchy. This path tells you that school districts can cross jurisdictional boundaries but do not cross state lines. Figure 2-3 at the end of this chapter presents similar information for the American Indian area/Alaska Native area/Hawaiian home land hierarchy. Again, read the schematic from the bottom, beginning with the lowest level of geography, i.e., census blocks.

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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GEOGRAPHIC HEADER RECORD
The geographic header record, Figure 2-4 at the end of this chapter, defines each field and provides its data dictionary reference name, field size, starting position, and data type. In addition, the presence or absence of an “X” in each summary level column is a guide to the presence or absence of geographic information for that particular summary level. For example, on the column for summary level 040, we see “X” for the first 10 fields, indicating that there will be information for those fields. In the county field, there is no “X,” indicating that there is no information for county in summary level 040. Since 040 is the summary level for state, this is perfectly logical. New ANSI Codes The geographic header record includes, for the first time, space reserved to accommodate the transition from the Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 55 Code Series to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Code Series for the identification of selected geographic entities. Each of nine fields has eight character spaces reserved for an eight-digit Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) identifier code that has been adopted as part of a new national standard. The GNIS is the nation’s official geographic names repository database and has been designated by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names as the official source of geographic names for use by the federal government and its contractors. Federal agencies are expected to adopt the GNIS ID as a standard code for public and federal data exchange. The fields identified in the geographic header record are: Field length 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 Field name State (ANSI) County (ANSI) County Subdivision (ANSI) Place (ANSI) Consolidated City (ANSI) American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home
� Land (ANSI)
� American Indian Tribal Subdivision (ANSI) Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANSI) Subminor Civil Division (ANSI)

The GNIS identifier for states, counties, and equivalent areas are supplemental codes that do not replace the federal standard two-digit state and three-digit county codes also appearing in the header. The Census Bureau will continue to maintain and use in its unique geographic identifiers the existing five-digit codes for place, county subdivision, consolidated city, Alaska Native Regional Corporation, and subminor civil division and will assign and issue codes for new entities to meet customer needs, although these codes are not “official” or part of the new ANSI standards. The Census Bureau also will continue to maintain the existing four-digit codes for American Indian area/Alaska Native area/Hawaiian home land and three-digit codes for American Indian tribal subdivision.

2-2

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

SUMMARY LEVEL SEQUENCE CHART
The summary level sequence chart (Chapter 3) identifies each geographic level and provides the code that is in the SUMLEV field. The last geographic area type listed in the sequence identifies the geography of the summary level. The prior codes simply identify the geographic hierarchy; for example, 060 State-County-County Subdivision. In summary level 060, the record contains data for a county subdivision within a county within a state. County subdivisions are uniquely named within a county and do not cross county boundaries. Since counties do not cross state boundaries, this is a simple application. Thus, summary level 060 provides data for a complete county subdivision. When reading the summary level sequence chart, it is important to recognize that hyphens (-) separate the individual hierarchies, while slashes separate different types of geography (such as place/remainder) within the same hierarchy.

DATA STRUCTURE AND SEGMENTATION
The data in the Demographic Profile Summary File and other 2010 Census summary files are segmented. This is done so that individual files will not have more than 255 fields, facilitating exporting into spreadsheet or database software. The demographic profile data and the corresponding geographic information for an individual state is known as the file set. This file set will be broken into two files as identified below: • Geographic Header Record file • File01 (DPSF1–DPSF23) To get the complete data set for the Demographic Profile Summary Files, users must download both files. It is easiest to think of the file set as a logical file. However, this logical file consists of two physical files: the geographic header record file and file01. This file design is comparable to that used in Census 2000. A unique logical record number (LOGRECNO in the geographic header) is assigned to all files for a specific geographic entity. This is done so all records for that specific entity can be linked together across files. Besides the logical record number, other identifying fields also are carried over from the geographic header file to the table files. These are file identification (FILEID), state/U.S. abbreviation (STUSAB), characteristic iteration (CHARITER), and characteristic iteration file sequence number (CIFSN). See Figure 2-1 on the next page for an example. The geographic header record is standard across all electronic data products from the 2010 Census. Since the Demographic Profile Summary Files are quite simple, many of the fields, including some header fields that appear in both files (geographic header and file01), are not used. For example, the CHARITER field will be used in the 2010 Census Summary File 2. In the 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File, it is always coded as 000. Note to Users of Microsoft Access Due to the FieldSize property limitations within Microsoft Access, modifications to field types are required when importing the Geographic Header Record file and File01: • All fields classified as numeric (N) should be imported as long integers. • AREALAND and AREAWATR should be imported as text. Failure to make these changes may result in missing data upon import.

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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Figure 2-1.

File Set Structure Schematic
Geographic header file Record 1 FILEID STUSAB CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO (Record 1) Remainder of geographic header record for geographic area x File01 FILEID STUSAB CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO (Record 1) Tables DPSF1–DPSF23 (186 cells)

Record 2 FILEID STUSAB CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO (Record 2) Remainder of geographic header record for geographic area y

FILEID STUSAB CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO (Record 2) Tables DPSF1–DPSF23 (186 cells)

Record 3 FILEID STUSAB CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO (Record 3) Remainder of geographic header record for geographic area z

FILEID STUSAB CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO (Record 3) Tables DPSF1–DPSF23 (186 cells)

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How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Figure 2-2.

Standard Hierarchy of Census Geographic Entities

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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Figure 2-3.

Hierarchy of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Areas

Hierarchy of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Areas

American Indian Areas (Federal)/ Off-Reservation Trust Lands

States

Tribal Designated Statistical Areas

Tribal Census Tracts

Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Areas

Alaska Native Regional Corporations / Alaska Native Village Statistical Areas / Hawaiian Home Lands

American Indian Reservations (state) / State Designated Tribal Statistical Areas

Tribal Block Groups

Tribal Subdivisions

CENSUS BLOCKS

2-6

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile State File
Summary Levels 067, 140, 281, 321, 345, 360, 361, 364, 871, 950, 960, and 970 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field RECORD CODES File Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FILEID State/U.S. Abbreviation (USPS). . . . . . . STUSAB Summary Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SUMLEV Geographic Component . . . . . . . . . . . . GEOCOMP Characteristic Iteration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHARITER Characteristic Iteration File Sequence Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CIFSN Logical Record Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . LOGRECNO GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODES Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State (FIPS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Class Code. . . . . . . . . . . . County Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Subdivision Class Code . . County Subdivision Size Code . . . . . . . Place (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Place Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . Place Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Use Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Consolidated City Class Code . . . Consolidated City Size Code. . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land (Census) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land (FIPS) . . . FIPS American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Trust Land/Hawaiian Home Land Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (Census) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS American Indian Tribal Subdivision Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Block Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Regional Corporation (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Alaska Native Regional Corporation Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/ Micropolitan Statistical Area . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/ Micropolitan Statistical Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area . . . . . New England City and Town Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined New England City and Town Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/ Micropolitan Statistical Area Principal City Indicator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Principal City Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Size Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban/Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (111th) . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZIP Code Tabulation Area (5-Digit) . . . . Subminor Civil Division (FIPS) . . . . . . . FIPS Subminor Civil Division Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School District (Elementary) . . . . . . . . . School District (Secondary). . . . . . . . . . School District (Unified) . . . . . . . . . . . . . REGION DIVISION STATE COUNTY COUNTYCC COUNTYSC COUSUB COUSUBCC COUSUBSC PLACE PLACECC PLACESC TRACT BLKGRP BLOCK IUC CONCIT CONCITCC CONCITSC AIANHH AIANHHFP AIANHHCC AIHHTLI AITSCE AITS AITSCC TTRACT TBLKGRP ANRC ANRCCC CBSA CBSASC METDIV CSA NECTA NECTASC NECTADIV CNECTA CBSAPCI NECTAPCI UA UASC UATYPE UR CD SLDU SLDL VTD VTDI RESERVE2 ZCTA5 SUBMCD SUBMCDCC SDELM SDSEC SDUNI 1 1 2 3 2 2 5 2 2 5 2 2 6 1 4 2 5 2 2 4 5 2 1 3 5 2 6 1 5 2 5 2 5 3 5 2 5 3 1 1 5 2 1 1 2 3 3 6 1 3 5 5 2 5 5 5 26 27 28 30 33 35 37 42 44 46 51 53 55 61 62 66 68 73 75 77 81 86 88 89 92 97 99 105 106 111 113 118 120 125 128 133 135 140 143 144 145 150 152 153 154 156 159 162 168 169 172 177 182 184 189 194 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6 2 3 2 3 2 7 1 7 9 12 14 17 19 A/N A A/N A/N A/N A/N N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Data dictionary reference Summary levels Field size Starting position Data type 040 050 060 067 140 160 170 230 280 281 320 321 323

X

X X X

X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X

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U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile State File—Con.
Summary Levels 067, 140, 281, 321, 345, 360, 361, 364, 871, 950, 960, and 970 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field AREA CHARACTERISTICS Area (Land) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area (Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area Name-Legal/Statistical Area Description (LSAD) Term-Part Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional Status Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Change User Note Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . . . Housing Unit Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Latitude) . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Longitude) . . . . . . . . . . . Legal/Statistical Area Description Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Part Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SPECIAL AREA CODES Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Growth Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . Place (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land (ANSI). . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subminor Civil Division (ANSI) . . . . . . . Congressional District (113th) . . . . . . . . Congressional District (114th) . . . . . . . . Congressional District (115th) . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area Size Code . . Combined NECTA Size Code . . . . . . . . Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . NECTA Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Use Microdata Area . . . . . . . . . . Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RESERVE3 UGA STATENS COUNTYNS COUSUBNS PLACENS CONCITNS AIANHHNS AITSNS ANRCNS SUBMCDNS CD113 CD114 CD115 SLDU2 SLDU3 SLDU4 SLDL2 SLDL3 SLDL4 AIANHHSC CSASC CNECTASC MEMI NMEMI PUMA RESERVED 6 5 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 5 18 363 369 374 382 390 398 406 414 422 430 438 446 448 450 452 455 458 461 464 467 470 472 474 476 477 478 483 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X AREALAND AREAWATR NAME FUNCSTAT GCUNI POP100 HU100 INTPTLAT INTPTLON LSADC PARTFLAG 14 14 90 1 1 9 9 11 12 2 1 199 213 227 317 318 319 328 337 348 360 362 N N A/N A/N A/N N N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Data dictionary reference Summary levels Field size Starting position Data type 040 050 060 067 140 160 170 230 280 281 320 321 323

X

X X

X X X

X X X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X X X

X X

X X X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

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How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile State File—Con.
Summary Levels 067, 140, 281, 321, 345, 360, 361, 364, 871, 950, 960, and 970 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field RECORD CODES File Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State/U.S. Abbreviation (USPS). . . . . . . Summary Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Component . . . . . . . . . . . . Characteristic Iteration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Characteristic Iteration File Sequence Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Logical Record Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODES Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State (FIPS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Class Code. . . . . . . . . . . . County Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Subdivision Class Code . . County Subdivision Size Code . . . . . . . Place (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Place Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . Place Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Use Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Consolidated City Class Code . . . Consolidated City Size Code. . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land (Census) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land (FIPS) . . . FIPS American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Trust Land/Hawaiian Home Land Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (Census) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS American Indian Tribal Subdivision Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Block Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Regional Corporation (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Alaska Native Regional Corporation Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/ Micropolitan Statistical Area . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/ Micropolitan Statistical Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area . . . . . New England City and Town Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined New England City and Town Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/ Micropolitan Statistical Area Principal City Indicator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Principal City Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Size Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban/Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (111th) . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZIP Code Tabulation Area (5-Digit) . . . . Subminor Civil Division (FIPS) . . . . . . . FIPS Subminor Civil Division Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School District (Elementary) . . . . . . . . . School District (Secondary). . . . . . . . . . School District (Unified) . . . . . . . . . . . . . REGION DIVISION STATE COUNTY COUNTYCC COUNTYSC COUSUB COUSUBCC COUSUBSC PLACE PLACECC PLACESC TRACT BLKGRP BLOCK IUC CONCIT CONCITCC CONCITSC AIANHH AIANHHFP AIANHHCC AIHHTLI AITSCE AITS AITSCC TTRACT TBLKGRP ANRC ANRCCC CBSA CBSASC METDIV CSA NECTA NECTASC NECTADIV CNECTA CBSAPCI NECTAPCI UA UASC UATYPE UR CD SLDU SLDL VTD VTDI RESERVE2 ZCTA5 SUBMCD SUBMCDCC SDELM SDSEC SDUNI 1 1 2 3 2 2 5 2 2 5 2 2 6 1 4 2 5 2 2 4 5 2 1 3 5 2 6 1 5 2 5 2 5 3 5 2 5 3 1 1 5 2 1 1 2 3 3 6 1 3 5 5 2 5 5 5 26 27 28 30 33 35 37 42 44 46 51 53 55 61 62 66 68 73 75 77 81 86 88 89 92 97 99 105 106 111 113 118 120 125 128 133 135 140 143 144 145 150 152 153 154 156 159 162 168 169 172 177 182 184 189 194 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X FILEID STUSAB SUMLEV GEOCOMP CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO 6 2 3 2 3 2 7 1 7 9 12 14 17 19 A/N A A/N A/N A/N A/N N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Data dictionary Field reference size Starting position Data type Summary levels 340 345 360 361 364 500 610 620 871 950 960 970

X X X

X

X X

X X

X X X X

X X X

X

X

X

X

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

2-9

Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile State File—Con.
Summary Levels 067, 140, 281, 321, 345, 360, 361, 364, 871, 950, 960, and 970 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field AREA CHARACTERISTICS Area (Land) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area (Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area Name-Legal/Statistical Area Description (LSAD) Term-Part Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional Status Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Change User Note Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . . . Housing Unit Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Latitude) . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Longitude) . . . . . . . . . . . Legal/Statistical Area Description Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Part Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SPECIAL AREA CODES Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Growth Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . Place (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land (ANSI). . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subminor Civil Division (ANSI) . . . . . . . Congressional District (113th) . . . . . . . . Congressional District (114th) . . . . . . . . Congressional District (115th) . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area Size Code . . Combined NECTA Size Code . . . . . . . . Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . NECTA Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Use Microdata Area . . . . . . . . . . Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RESERVE3 UGA STATENS COUNTYNS COUSUBNS PLACENS CONCITNS AIANHHNS AITSNS ANRCNS SUBMCDNS CD113 CD114 CD115 SLDU2 SLDU3 SLDU4 SLDL2 SLDL3 SLDL4 AIANHHSC CSASC CNECTASC MEMI NMEMI PUMA RESERVED 6 5 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 5 18 363 369 374 382 390 398 406 414 422 430 438 446 448 450 452 455 458 461 464 467 470 472 474 476 477 478 483 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N AREALAND AREAWATR NAME FUNCSTAT GCUNI POP100 HU100 INTPTLAT INTPTLON LSADC PARTFLAG 14 14 90 1 1 9 9 11 12 2 1 199 213 227 317 318 319 328 337 348 360 362 N N A/N A/N A/N N N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Data dictionary reference Summary levels Field size Starting position Data type 340 345 360 361 364 500 610 620 871 950 960 970

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X

2-10

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile National File
Summary Levels 050, 060, 160, 170, 230, 256, 312, 335, 350, 352, 355, 610, 620, 860, and 870 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field RECORD CODES File Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State/U.S. Abbreviation (USPS). . . . . . . . . Summary Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Characteristic Iteration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Characteristic Iteration File Sequence Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Logical Record Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODES Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State (FIPS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Class Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Subdivision Class Code . . . . County Subdivision Size Code . . . . . . . . . Place (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Place Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Place Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Use Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Consolidated City Class Code . . . . . Consolidated City Size Code. . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (Census) . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . FIPS American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Trust Land/Hawaiian Home Land Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (Census) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS American Indian Tribal Subdivision Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Block Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Regional Corporation (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Alaska Native Regional Corporation Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined New England City and Town Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area Principal City Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Principal City Indicator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Size Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban/Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (111th) . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZIP Code Tabulation Area (5-Digit) . . . . . . Subminor Civil Division (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . FIPS Subminor Civil Division Class Code . School District (Elementary) . . . . . . . . . . . School District (Secondary). . . . . . . . . . . . School District (Unified) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REGION DIVISION STATE COUNTY COUNTYCC COUNTYSC COUSUB COUSUBCC COUSUBSC PLACE PLACECC PLACESC TRACT BLKGRP BLOCK IUC CONCIT CONCITCC CONCITSC AIANHH AIANHHFP AIANHHCC AIHHTLI AITSCE AITS AITSCC TTRACT TBLKGRP ANRC ANRCCC CBSA CBSASC METDIV CSA NECTA NECTASC NECTADIV CNECTA CBSAPCI NECTAPCI UA UASC UATYPE UR CD SLDU SLDL VTD VTDI RESERVE2 ZCTA5 SUBMCD SUBMCDCC SDELM SDSEC SDUNI 1 1 2 3 2 2 5 2 2 5 2 2 6 1 4 2 5 2 2 4 5 2 1 3 5 2 6 1 5 2 5 2 5 3 5 2 5 3 1 1 5 2 1 1 2 3 3 6 1 3 5 5 2 5 5 5 26 27 28 30 33 35 37 42 44 46 51 53 55 61 62 66 68 73 75 77 81 86 88 89 92 97 99 105 106 111 113 118 120 125 128 133 135 140 143 144 145 150 152 153 154 156 159 162 168 169 172 177 182 184 189 194 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X FILEID STUSAB SUMLEV GEOCOMP CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO 6 2 3 2 3 2 7 1 7 9 12 14 17 19 A/N A A/N A/N A/N A/N N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Data dictionary reference Summary levels Field size Starting position Data type 010 020 030 040 050 060 160 170 230 250 256 310

X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

2-11

Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile National File—Con.
Summary Levels 050, 060, 160, 170, 230, 256, 312, 335, 350, 352, 355, 610, 620, 860, and 870 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field AREA CHARACTERISTICS Area (Land) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area (Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area Name-Legal/Statistical Area Description (LSAD) Term-Part Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional Status Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Change User Note Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Housing Unit Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Latitude) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Longitude) . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal/Statistical Area Description Code . . Part Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SPECIAL AREA CODES Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Growth Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . Place (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subminor Civil Division (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (113th) . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (114th) . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (115th) . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land Size Code . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area Size Code . . . . Combined NECTA Size Code . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . . . NECTA Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Use Microdata Area . . . . . . . . . . . . Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RESERVE3 UGA STATENS COUNTYNS COUSUBNS PLACENS CONCITNS AIANHHNS AITSNS ANRCNS SUBMCDNS CD113 CD114 CD115 SLDU2 SLDU3 SLDU4 SLDL2 SLDL3 SLDL4 AIANHHSC CSASC CNECTASC MEMI NMEMI PUMA RESERVED 6 5 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 5 18 363 369 374 382 390 398 406 414 422 430 438 446 448 450 452 455 458 461 464 467 470 472 474 476 477 478 483 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X AREALAND AREAWATR NAME FUNCSTAT GCUNI POP100 HU100 INTPTLAT INTPTLON LSADC PARTFLAG 14 14 90 1 1 9 9 11 12 2 1 199 213 227 317 318 319 328 337 348 360 362 N N A/N A/N A/N N N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Data dictionary reference Summary levels Field size Starting position Data type 010 020 030 040 050 060 160 170 230 250 256 310

X

X X

X X X

X X

X

X

X X X

2-12

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile National File—Con.
Summary Levels 050, 060, 160, 170, 230, 256, 312, 335, 350, 352, 355, 610, 620, 860, and 870 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field RECORD CODES File Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FILEID State/U.S. Abbreviation (USPS). . . . . . . . . STUSAB Summary Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SUMLEV Geographic Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GEOCOMP Characteristic Iteration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHARITER Characteristic Iteration File Sequence Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CIFSN Logical Record Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LOGRECNO GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODES Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State (FIPS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Class Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS County Subdivision Class Code . . . . County Subdivision Size Code . . . . . . . . . Place (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Place Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Place Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Use Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Consolidated City Class Code . . . . . Consolidated City Size Code. . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (Census) . . . . . . . American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . FIPS American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Trust Land/Hawaiian Home Land Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (Census) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS American Indian Tribal Subdivision Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Block Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Regional Corporation (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Alaska Native Regional Corporation Class Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Size Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined New England City and Town Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area Principal City Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Principal City Indicator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Size Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Area Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban/Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (111th) . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZIP Code Tabulation Area (5-Digit) . . . . . . Subminor Civil Division (FIPS) . . . . . . . . . FIPS Subminor Civil Division Class Code . School District (Elementary) . . . . . . . . . . . School District (Secondary). . . . . . . . . . . . REGION DIVISION STATE COUNTY COUNTYCC COUNTYSC COUSUB COUSUBCC COUSUBSC PLACE PLACECC PLACESC TRACT BLKGRP BLOCK IUC CONCIT CONCITCC CONCITSC AIANHH AIANHHFP AIANHHCC AIHHTLI AITSCE AITS AITSCC TTRACT TBLKGRP ANRC ANRCCC CBSA CBSASC METDIV CSA NECTA NECTASC NECTADIV CNECTA CBSAPCI NECTAPCI UA UASC UATYPE UR CD SLDU SLDL VTD VTDI RESERVE2 ZCTA5 SUBMCD SUBMCDCC SDELM SDSEC 1 1 2 3 2 2 5 2 2 5 2 2 6 1 4 2 5 2 2 4 5 2 1 3 5 2 6 1 5 2 5 2 5 3 5 2 5 3 1 1 5 2 1 1 2 3 3 6 1 3 5 5 2 5 5 26 27 28 30 33 35 37 42 44 46 51 53 55 61 62 66 68 73 75 77 81 86 88 89 92 97 99 105 106 111 113 118 120 125 128 133 135 140 143 144 145 150 152 153 154 156 159 162 168 169 172 177 182 184 189 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6 2 3 2 3 2 7 1 7 9 12 14 17 19 A/N A A/N A/N A/N A/N N X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Data dictionary reference Summary levels Field size Starting Data position type 312 314 330 335 350 352 355 500 610 620 860 870

X X X

X X X

X

X X

X X

X X X X

X X X

X

X

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

2-13

Figure 2-4.

Geographic header Record Demographic profile National File—Con.
Summary Levels 050, 060, 160, 170, 230, 256, 312, 335, 350, 352, 355, 610, 620, 860, and 870 were added in the geographic update August 2011. Field School District (Unified) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AREA CHARACTERISTICS Area (Land) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area (Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area Name-Legal/Statistical Area Description (LSAD) Term-Part Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional Status Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Change User Note Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Housing Unit Count (100%). . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Latitude) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (Longitude) . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal/Statistical Area Description Code . . Part Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SPECIAL AREA CODES Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RESERVE3 Urban Growth Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UGA State (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STATENS County (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COUNTYNS County Subdivision (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . COUSUBNS Place (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PLACENS Consolidated City (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . CONCITNS American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . AIANHHNS American Indian Tribal Subdivision (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AITSNS Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ANRCNS Subminor Civil Division (ANSI) . . . . . . . . . SUBMCDNS CD113 Congressional District (113th) . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (114th) . . . . . . . . . . CD114 CD115 Congressional District (115th) . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SLDU2 State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SLDU3 State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SLDU4 State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SLDL2 State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SLDL3 State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SLDL4 American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land Size Code . . . . . . AIANHHSC Combined Statistical Area Size Code . . . . CSASC Combined NECTA Size Code . . . . . . . . . . CNECTASC MEMI Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . . . NECTA Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NMEMI Public Use Microdata Area . . . . . . . . . . . . PUMA Reserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RESERVED 6 5 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 5 18 363 369 374 382 390 398 406 414 422 430 438 446 448 450 452 455 458 461 464 467 470 472 474 476 477 478 483 A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N X X X X X Data dictionary reference SDUNI AREALAND AREAWATR NAME FUNCSTAT GCUNI POP100 HU100 INTPTLAT INTPTLON LSADC PARTFLAG Summary levels Field size 5 14 14 90 1 1 9 9 11 12 2 1 Starting Data position type 194 A/N 199 213 227 317 318 319 328 337 348 360 362 N N A/N A/N A/N N N A/N A/N A/N A/N 312 314 330 335 350 352 355 500 610 620 860 870

X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X

2-14

How to Use This Product
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Chapter 3. Summary Level Sequence Chart

Summary levels specify the content and hierarchical relationships of the geographic elements that are required to tabulate and summarize data. In the Summary Level Sequence Chart that follows, the summary level code precedes the summary level area, and symbols are used with special meaning for summary levels: Hyphen “-” separates the elements of a hierarchy. Slash “/” denotes equivalent elements that have different names. Parentheses “( )” are not used in the specification for summary levels, but are used occasionally in the usual and customary manner in statements of clarification. National File Summary Levels 050, 060, 160, 170, 610, 620, 256, 230, 312, 350, 352, 355, 335, 860, and 870 and Geographic Components 89-95, A1-A2, CE-CT, EB-EJ, H0, M1 and M2 were added in the geographic update August 2011.
Geographic component 00, 89-95, A0, A1-A2, C0-C2, C7-CD, CE-CT, E0-E2, E7-EA, EB-EJ, G0, H0 00, 89-95, A0, A1-A2, C0-C2, E0-E2, G0, H0 00, 89-95, A0, A1-A2, C0-C2, E0-E2, G0, H0 00, 89-95, A0, A1-A2, C0-C2, E0-E2, G0, H0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00, A1-A2 00 00 00, C0-C2, E0-E2 00, M1, M2 00 00 00, M1, M2 00 00
1 2

Summary level 010 020 030 040 United States Region Division State1 050 State-County2 060 State-County-County Subdivision 160 State-Place 170 State-Consolidated City 500 State-Congressional District3 610 State-State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) 620 State-State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land 256 American Indian Area-Tribal Census Tract4 State-Alaska Native Regional Corporation Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area 312 Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area-State-Principal City 314 Metropolitan Statistical Area-Metropolitan Division Combined Statistical Area New England City and Town Area 352 New England City and Town Area-State-Principal City 355 New England City and Town Area (NECTA)-NECTA Division Combined New England City and Town Area 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Area 870 5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Area-State

250 230 310

330 350

335 860

State, District of Columbia, or Puerto Rico. Parish in Louisiana; borough, census area, city and borough, or municipality in Alaska; and municipio in Puerto Rico. In Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and Virginia, one or more cities are independent of counties and are treated as statistical equivalents of counties. The entire District of Columbia, which has no counties, is treated as a county equivalent. 3 111th Congress. 4 Tribal Census Tracts exist only in federally recognized American Indian reservations and/or off-reservation trust lands.

Summary Level Sequence Chart
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

3-1

State File Summary Levels 067, 140, 281, 321, 360, 361, 364, 345, 871, 950, 960, and 970 and Geographic Components 89-95, A1-A2, and H0 were added in the geographic update August 2011.
Geographic component 00, 89-95, A0, A1-A2 C0-C2, E0-E2, G0, H0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
1

Summary level 040 State 050 State-County2 060 State-County-County Subdivision 067 State-County-County Subdivision-Subminor Civil Division3
1

140 State-County-Census Tract State-Place State-Consolidated City State-American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land 281 State-American Indian Area-Tribal Subdivision/ Remainder4 230 State-Alaska Native Regional Corporation 320 State-Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area 321 State-Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area-Principal City 323 State-Metropolitan Statistical Area-Metropolitan Division 340 State-Combined Statistical Area 360 State-New England City and Town Area 361 State-New England City and Town Area-Principal City 364 State-New England City and Town Area (NECTA)-NECTA Division 345 State-Combined New England City and Town Area 500 State-Congressional District5 610 State-State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) 160 170 280 620 871 950 960 970 State-State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) State-5-Digit ZIP Code Tabulation Area State-School District (Elementrary)/Remainder State-School District (Secondary)/Remainder State-School District (Unified)/Remainder

State, District of Columbia, or Puerto Rico. 2 Parish in Louisiana; borough, census area, city and borough, or municipality in Alaska; and municipio in Puerto Rico. In Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and Virginia, one or more cities are independent of counties and are treated as statistical equivalents of counties. The entire District of Columbia, which has no counties, is treated as a county equivalent. 3 Subbarrio in Puerto Rico only. 4 Tribal Subdivisions exist only within those federally recognized American Indian reservations and/or off-reservation trust lands and Oklahoma tribal statistical areas (OTSAs) where tribal officials provided boundaries to the Census Bureau. 5 111th Congress.

3-2

Summary Level Sequence Chart
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Chapter 4. Data Dictionary
CONTENTS
Identification Section . . . . Record Codes . . . . . . . . Geographic Area Codes Area Characteristics . . . Special Area Codes . . . . Endnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . Table (Matrix) Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4-1 4-2 4-8 4-13 4-15 4-21

IDENTIFICATION SECTION
Field name Data dictionary reference name Field size Starting position Data type

NOTE: The filling of codes and data attributes in the files is specific to summary level; not all fields are filled for every summary level. Where a code or attribute is specified, the actual value is assigned to the field except for the use of three special codes: Assignment of codes of nine (9) indicates a balance record or that the entity or attribute does not exist for this record. Assignment of pound signs (#) indicates that more than one value exists for this field and, thus, no specific value can be assigned. Assignment of exclamation marks (!) indicates that the data are not yet available for this product. Record Codes File Identification1 DPST 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File STUSAB Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Massachusetts Maryland Maine Michigan Minnesota Missouri Mississippi Montana NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA PR North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico Nevada New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Puerto Rico 2 RI SC SD TN TX US UT VA VT WA WI WV WY 7 Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas United States Utah Virginia Vermont Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming A FILEID 6 1 A/N

State/U.S. Abbreviation (USPS) AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID Alaska Alabama Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut District of Columbia Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-1

Record Codes—Con. Summary Level2 Geographic Component3 00 Not a geographic component CHARITER 3 14 A/N SUMLEV GEOCOMP 3 2 9 12 A/N A/N

Characteristic Iteration4 000 Not a characteristic iteration

Characteristic Iteration File Sequence Number5 Logical Record Number6 Geographic Area Codes Region7 1 2 3 4 9

CIFSN LOGRECNO

2 7

17 19

A/N N

REGION Northeast Midwest South West Not in a region (Puerto Rico) DIVISION

1

26

A/N

Division7 0 Not in a division (Puerto Rico) 1 New England 2 Middle Atlantic 3 East North Central 4 West North Central 5 South Atlantic 6 East South Central 7 West South Central 8 Mountain 9 Pacific State (FIPS)7, 8 01 Alabama 02 Alaska 04 Arizona 05 Arkansas 06 California 08 Colorado 09 Connecticut 10 Delaware 11 District of Columbia 12 Florida 13 Georgia 15 Hawaii 16 Idaho County7, 8 001–507 510–840 County or equivalent area code Independent city code

1

27

A/N

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri

30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42

STATE Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania COUNTY

2 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 54 55 56 72 3

28 A/N Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Puerto Rico 30 A/N

4-2

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Geographic Area Codes—Con. FIPS County Class Code8 � C7 H1 H4 H5 H6 COUNTYCC 2 33 A/N An incorporated place that is independent of any county An active county or equivalent area An inactive county or equivalent area A statistical county equivalent area A county or equivalent feature that has consolidated its government with an incorporated place COUNTYSC COUSUB 2 5 35 37 A/N A/N

County Size Code9 � County Subdivision (FIPS)7, 8 � 00000 � 00001–89999 � 90000–98999 �

Water area not assigned to a county subdivision County subdivision in a state-level entity with governmental entities and in Alaska and Puerto Rico County subdivision in a state with administrative or statistical entities (excluding Alaska and Puerto Rico) COUSUBCC 2 42 A/N

FIPS County Subdivision Class Code8 � C2 C5 C7 T1 T2 T5 T9 Z1 Z2 Z3 Z5 Z7 Z9

An active incorporated place that is legally coextensive with a county subdivision but treated as independent of any county subdivision (an independent place) An active incorporated place that is independent of any county subdivision and serves as a county subdivision equivalent (an independent place) An incorporated place that is independent of any county (an independent city) An active county subdivision that is not coextensive with an incorporated place An active county subdivision that is coextensive with a census designated place An active county subdivision that is coextensive with an incorporated place An inactive county subdivision A nonfunctioning county subdivision A county subdivision that is coextensive with or wholly contained within a legal American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian area and is independent of any other county subdivision A county subdivision defined as a statistical unorganized territory A statistical census county division (CCD) or census subarea (Alaska only) An active incorporated place that is legally coextensive with or independent of any county subdivision in a state with only nonfunctioning county subdivisions (an independent place) Water area not assigned to a county subdivision COUSUBSC PLACE Incorporated place or census designated place (CDP) PLACECC 2 51 A/N 2 5 44 46 A/N A/N

County Subdivision Size Code9 Place (FIPS)7, 8 00001–89999 FIPS Place Class Code8 C1 � C2 �

An active incorporated place that does not serve as a county subdivision equivalent An active incorporated place that is legally coextensive with a county subdivision but treated as independent of any county subdivision (an independent place)

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-3

Geographic Area Codes—Con. FIPS Place Class Code8—Con. C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 M2 U1 U2 An active incorporated place that is independent of any county subdivision and serves as a county subdivision equivalent (an independent place) An active incorporated place that is partially independent of any county subdivision and partially dependent within a legal county subdivision (exists in Iowa and Ohio only)
� An incorporated place that is independent of any county (an independent city)
� The balance of a consolidated city excluding the separately incorporated place(s) within that consolidated government An inactive or nonfunctioning incorporated place A census designated place (CDP) defined within a military or Coast Guard installation A census designated place (CDP) with a name officially recognized by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names for a populated place A census designated place (CDP) with a name not officially recognized by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names for a populated place PLACESC TRACT Census tract BLKGRP 1 61 A/N 2 6 53 55 A/N A/N

Place Size Code9 Census Tract7 000100–998999 Block Group7 0 1–9 Block7 0001–0999 1000–9999 Internal Use Code10 Consolidated City (FIPS)7, 8 03436 04200 11390 36000 47500 48003 52004 Athens-Clarke County, Georgia
� Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia
� Butte-Silver Bow, Montana
� Indianapolis, Indiana
� Milford, Connecticut
� Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky
� Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee Block in a water area only block group
� Block (can be all land, all water, or mixed) Block group (water area only)
� Block group (land or land and water area)


BLOCK

4

62

A/N

IUC CONCIT

2 5

66 68

A/N A/N

FIPS Consolidated City Class Code8 C3 Consolidated city

CONCITCC

2

73

A/N

Consolidated City Size Code9 American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (Census)7 0001–4999 4-4

CONCITSC

2

75

A/N

AIANHH

4

77

A/N

Federally recognized American Indian reservation and/or off-reservation trust land Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Geographic Area Codes—Con. American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/Hawaiian Home Land (Census)7—Con. 5000–5499 5500–5999 6000–7999 8000–8999 9000–9499 9500–9998 Hawaiian home land Oklahoma tribal statistical area Alaska Native village statistical area Tribal designated statistical area State-recognized American Indian reservation State designated tribal statistical area

American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (FIPS)7, 8, 11 00001–89999

AIANHHFP

5

81

A/N

American Indian area, Alaska Native area, or Hawaiian home land

FIPS American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land Class Code8 D0 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 � D8 D9 E1 F1

AIANHHCC

2

86

A/N

Statistical or legal area administered and/or claimed by two or more American Indian tribes Legal federally recognized American Indian area consisting of reservation and associated off-reservation trust land Legal federally recognized American Indian area consisting of reservation only Legal federally recognized American Indian area consisting of off-reservation trust land only Legal state-recognized American Indian reservation The off-reservation trust land portion of an American Indian area with both a reservation and off-reservation trust land Statistical American Indian area defined for a federally recognized tribe that does not have a reservation or off-reservation trust land, specifically a tribal designated statistical area (TDSA) or Oklahoma tribal statistical area (OTSA) The reservation portion of an American Indian area with both a reservation and off-reservation trust land Statistical American Indian area defined for a state-recognized tribe that does not have a reservation or off-reservation trust land, specifically a state designated tribal statistical area Alaska Native village statistical area Hawaiian home land

American Indian Trust Land/Hawaiian Home Land Indicator R T M 9

AIHHTLI

1

88

A/N

American Indian reservation or statistical entity only American Indian off-reservation trust land only or Hawaiian home land American Indian reservation and off-reservation trust land Not in an American Indian area or Hawaiian home land AITSCE 3 89 A/N

American Indian Tribal Subdivision (Census)7 � 001–998 American Indian tribal subdivision

American Indian Tribal Subdivision (FIPS)7, 8, 11 � 00001–89999 American Indian tribal subdivision

AITS

5

92

A/N

FIPS American Indian Tribal Subdivision Class Code8 D7 � American Indian tribal subdivision

AITSCC

2

97

A/N

Tribal Census Tract � T00100–T98999 Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

TTRACT Tribal census tract

6

99

A/N

4-5

Geographic Area Codes—Con. Tribal Block Group A–H, J, K Tribal block group ANRC 5 106 A/N TBLKGRP 1 105 A/N

Alaska Native Regional Corporation (FIPS)7, 8 00590 01570 03950 06370 09040 09800 14410 17140 20010 41640 52120 67940 Ahtna Aleut Arctic Slope Bering Straits Bristol Bay Calista Chugach Cook Inlet Doyon Koniag NANA Sealaska

FIPS Alaska Native Regional Corporation Class Code8 E7 Alaska Native Regional Corporation

ANRCCC

2

111

A/N

Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area7, 8 10000–49999

CBSA

5

113

A/N

Metropolitan or Micropolitan Statistical Area (cannot end in “4”)

Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area Size Code9 Metropolitan Division 10004–49994
7, 8

CBSASC METDIV

2 5

118 120

A/N A/N

Metropolitan Division (always ends in “4”) CSA 3 125 A/N

Combined Statistical Area7, 8 100–599 Combined Statistical Area

New England City and Town Area7, 8 70000–79999

NECTA

5

128

A/N

New England City and Town Area (cannot end in “4”) NECTASC NECTADIV 2 5 133 135 A/N A/N

New England City and Town Area Size Code9 New England City and Town Area Division7, 8 70004–79994

New England City and Town Area Division (always ends in “4”) CNECTA 3 140 A/N

Combined New England City and Town Area7, 8 700–799 Combined New England City and Town Area

Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area Principal City Indicator7

CBSAPCI

1

143

A/N

4-6

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Geographic Area Codes—Con. Metropolitan Statistical Area/Micropolitan Statistical Area Principal City Indicator7—Con. Y N 9 Place is a principal city of a metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area
� Place is not a principal city of a metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area Not in a place

New England City and Town Area Principal City Indicator7 Y N 9

NECTAPCI

1

144

A/N

Place is a principal city of a New England city and town area Place is not a principal city of a New England city and town area Not in a place UA Urbanized area or urban cluster UASC UATYPE 2 1 150 152 A/N A/N 5 145 A/N

Urban Area7, 12 00001–98999

Urban Area Size Code9, 12 Urban Area Type7, 12 U C 9 Urbanized area Urban cluster
� Not in an urban area


Urban/Rural7, 12 U R M

UR

1

153

A/N

Area is classified as urban Area is classified as rural Mixed–part is classified as urban and part is classified as rural CD 2 154 A/N

Congressional District (111th)7, 8, 13 01–53 00 98

The actual Congressional District number Applies to states whose representative is elected “at large”; the state has only one Representative in the United States House of Representatives Applies to areas that have an “at large” nonvoting delegate or resident commissioner in the United States House of Representatives

State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 1)7, 14 State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 1)7, 14 Voting District7, 15 Voting District Indicator A P Blank Reserved ZIP Code Tabulation Area (5-digit)7, 12
7

SLDU

3

156

A/N

SLDL VTD VTDI

3 6 1

159 162 168

A/N A/N A/N

Actual
� Pseudo (adjusted) Voting districts not defined (entire state or county)
� RESERVE2 ZCTA5 3 5 169 172 A/N A/N

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-7

Geographic Area Codes—Con. Subminor Civil Division (FIPS)7, 8 00001–89999 Subbarrio (Puerto Rico only) SUBMCDCC 2 182 A/N SUBMCD 5 177 A/N

FIPS Subminor Civil Division Class Code8 Z6 Subbarrio (Puerto Rico only)

School District (Elementary)7 00001–99996 School district

SDELM

5

184

A/N

School District (Secondary)7 00001–99996 School district

SDSEC

5

189

A/N

School District (Unified)7 00001–99996 99997 99998

SDUNI

5

194

A/N

School district School district not defined (land area) School district not defined (water area only)

Area Characteristics Area (Land)16 Area (Water)
17

AREALAND AREAWATR NAME FUNCSTAT

14 14 90 1

199 213 227 317

N N A/N A/N

Area Name-Legal/Statistical Area Description (LSAD) Term-Part Indicator18 Functional Status Code A B C E F G I N S

Active governmental unit providing primary general-purpose functions Active governmental unit that is partially consolidated with another government but with separate officials, providing primary general-purpose functions Active governmental unit consolidated with another government with a single set of officials, providing general-purpose functions Active governmental unit providing special-purpose functions Fictitious entity created to fill the Census Bureau’s geographic hierarchy Active governmental unit that is subordinate to another unit of government; not classified as a government by the Census Bureau’s Governments Division Inactive governmental unit that has the ability to activate and provide primary special-purpose functions Nonfunctioning legal entity (not a governmental unit) Statistical entity GCUNI 1 318 A/N

Geographic Change User Note Indicator Y N Geographic change user note exists for this entity No geographic change user note exists for this entity


Population Count (100%)19 Housing Unit Count (100%)20 Internal Point (Latitude)
21

POP100 HU100 INTPTLAT INTPTLON LSADC

9 9 11 12 2

319 328 337 348 360

N N A/N A/N A/N

Internal Point (Longitude)22 Legal/Statistical Area Description Code

4-8

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Area Characteristics—Con. Legal/Statistical Area Description Code—Con. 00 � 03 � 04 � 05 � 06 � 07 � None—no legal/statistical area description exists; no text is appended to the name of the entity City and borough—legal county equivalent in Alaska (Juneau, Sitka, Wrangell, and Yakutat); “City and Borough” is appended to the name of the entity Borough—county equivalent in Alaska; “Borough” is appended to the name of the entity Census area—statistical county equivalent in Alaska; “Census Area” is appended to the name of the entity County—legal division of 48 states; “County” is appended to the name of the entity District—1) legal tribal subdivision in Arizona, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; 2) state legislative district (upper chamber) in Massachusetts; and 3) state legislative district (lower chamber) in Massachusetts; “District” is appended to the name of the entity Municipality—legal county equivalent in Alaska (Anchorage and Skagway); “Municipality” is appended to the name of the entity Municipio—legal county equivalent in Puerto Rico; “Municipio” is appended to the name of the entity Parish—legal county equivalent in Louisiana; “Parish” is appended to the name of the entity Barrio—minor civil division (MCD) in Puerto Rico; “barrio” is appended to the name of the entity Borough—1) minor civil division (MCD) in New York; 2) MCD equivalent (independent place) in New Jersey and Pennsylvania; 3) incorporated place in Connecticut, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania; “borough” is appended to the name of the entity Census county division (CCD)—statistical county subdivision in 20 states; “CCD” is appended to the name of the entity Census subarea—statistical county subdivision in Alaska; “census subarea” is appended to the name of the entity City—1) legal county equivalent in Maryland, Missouri, and Virginia (independent city); 2) minor civil division (MCD) equivalent in 23 states and the District of Columbia (independent place); 3) incorporated place in 49 states and the District of Columbia; 4) consolidated city in Connecticut (Milford) and Indiana (Indianapolis); “city” is appended to the name of the entity District (election, magisterial)—minor civil division (MCD) in Virginia and West Virginia; “district” is appended to the name of the entity District (commissioner, election, magisterial, supervisors’, or parish governing authority)—1) minor civil division (MCD) in Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia; 2) tribal subdivision in Arizona and South Dakota; “District” is added before the name of the entity Election precinct—minor civil division (MCD) in Illinois and Nebraska; “precinct” is appended to the name of the entity Election precinct—minor civil division (MCD) in Illinois and Nebraska; “Precinct” is added before the name of the entity Gore—minor civil division (MCD) in Maine and Vermont; “gore” is appended to the name of the entity Grant—minor civil division (MCD) in New Hampshire and Vermont; “grant” is appended to the name of the entity Location—minor civil division (MCD) in New Hampshire; “location” is appended to the name of the entity Municipality—1) minor civil division (MCD) equivalent in Pennsylvania (independent place); 2) incorporated place in Alaska (Anchorage) and Pennsylvania; “municipality” is appended to the name of the entity Plantation—minor civil division (MCD) in Maine; “plantation” is appended to the name of the entity Barrio-pueblo—minor civil division (MCD) in Puerto Rico; “barrio-pueblo” is appended to the name of the entity 4-9

12 � 13 � 15 � 20 � 21 �

22 � 23 � 25 �

27 � 28 �

29 � 30 � 31 � 32 � 36 � 37 �

39 � 41 �

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Area Characteristics—Con. Legal/Statistical Area Description Code—Con. 42 � 43 � Purchase—minor civil division (MCD) in New Hampshire; “purchase” is appended to the name of the entity Town—1) minor civil division (MCD) in eight states; 2) MCD equivalent in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and South Dakota (independent place); 3) incorporated place in 30 states; “town” is appended to the name of the entity Township—minor civil division (MCD) in 16 states; “township” is appended to the name of the entity Township—minor civil division (MCD) in Arkansas, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, and North Carolina; “Township” is added before the name of the entity Unorganized territory—minor civil division (MCD) in nine states; “UT” is appended to the name of the entity Village—1) minor civil division (MCD) equivalent in New Jersey, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin (independent place); 2) incorporated place in 19 states; “village” is appended to the name of the entity Charter township—minor civil division (MCD) in Michigan; “charter township” is appended to the name of the entity Subbarrio—subminor civil division (sub-MCD) in Puerto Rico; “subbarrio” is appended to the name of the entity City and borough—incorporated place in Alaska (Juneau, Sitka, and Wrangell); “city and borough” is appended to the name of the entity Comunidad—statistical place (census designated place) in Puerto Rico; “comunidad” is appended to the name of the entity Census designated place—statistical place in all 50 states; “CDP” is appended to the name of the entity Zona urbana—statistical place (census designated place) in Puerto Rico; “zona urbana” is appended to the name of the entity Census region—statistical division of the United States; “Region” is appended to the name of the entity Census division—statistical division of the United States; “Division” is appended to the name of the entity Urban growth area (UGA)—legal area in Oregon and Washington; “UGA” is appended to the name of the entity Urbanized area (UA)—statistical urban area in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; “Urbanized Area” is appended to the name of the entity Urban cluster (UC)—statistical urban area in all 50 states and Puerto Rico; “Urban Cluster” is appended to the name of the entity Alaska Native Regional Corporation—legal Alaska Native area in Alaska; “Alaska Native Regional Corporation” is appended to the name of the entity Hawaiian home land—legal Native Hawaiian area in Hawaii; “Hawaiian Home Land” is appended to the name of the entity Alaska Native village statistical area—statistical Alaska Native area in Alaska; “ANVSA” is appended to the name of the entity Tribal designated statistical area—statistical American Indian reservation equivalent in California, New York, and Washington for federally recognized tribes without a legal land base outside of Oklahoma; “TDSA” is appended to the name of the entity Colony—American Indian reservation in Nevada; “Colony” is appended to the name of the entity Community—1) American Indian reservation in California, Minnesota, Nevada, Oregon, and Wisconsin; “Community” is appended to the name of the entity; 2) American Indian tribal subdivision in North Carolina and Oklahoma Joint-use area—American Indian reservation equivalent in Kansas and New Mexico; “joint-use area” is appended to the name of the entity Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

44 � 45 � 46 � 47 �

49 � 51 � 53 � 55 � 57 � 62 � 68 � 69 � 70 � 75 � 76 � 77 � 78 � 79 � 80 �

81 � 82 �

83 � 4-10

Area Characteristics—Con. Legal/Statistical Area Description Code—Con. 84 � 85 � 86 � 87 � 88 � 89 � 90 � 91 � 92 � Pueblo—American Indian reservation in New Mexico and Texas; “Pueblo” is appended to the name of the entity Rancheria—American Indian reservation in California; “Rancheria” is appended to the name of the entity Reservation—1) American Indian reservation in 34 states; 2) minor civil division (MCD) equivalent in Maine and New York; “Reservation” is appended to the name of the entity Reserve—American Indian reservation in Alaska; “Reserve” is appended to the name of the entity Oklahoma tribal statistical area—statistical American Indian reservation equivalent in Oklahoma; “OTSA” is appended to the name of the entity Trust land—legal American Indian reservation equivalent in nine states; “Trust Land” is appended to the name of the entity Joint-use Oklahoma tribal statistical area—statistical American Indian reservation equivalent in Oklahoma; “joint-use OTSA” is appended to the name of the entity Ranch—American Indian reservation in Nevada; “Ranch” is appended to the name of the entity State designated tribal statistical area—statistical American Indian reservation equivalent in Alabama, Delaware, Louisiana, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia; “SDTSA” is appended to the name of the entity Indian village—American Indian reservation in California; “Indian Village” is appended to the name of the entity Village—American Indian reservation in California and Oregon; “Village” is appended to the name of the entity Indian community—American Indian reservation in Michigan and Minnesota; “Indian Community” is appended to the name of the entity Indian reservation—American Indian reservation in Arizona, California, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington; “Indian Reservation” is appended to the name of the entity Indian rancheria—American Indian reservation in California; “Indian Rancheria” is appended to the name of the entity Indian colony—American Indian reservation in Nevada and Oregon; “Indian Colony” is appended to the name of the entity Pueblo de—American Indian reservation in New Mexico; “Pueblo de” is added before the name of the entity Pueblo of—American Indian reservation in New Mexico; “Pueblo of” is added before the name of the entity Settlement—American Indian reservation in Iowa; “Settlement” is appended to the name of the entity Block group—statistical area in the United States and Puerto Rico; “Block Group” is added before the name (code) of the entity Block—statistical area in the United States and Puerto Rico; “Block” is added before the name (code) of the entity Congressional district (at large)—congressional district in a single-district state (Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming); “Congressional District (at Large)” appears as the name of the entity Congressional district—congressional district in a state with more than one district (43 states); “Congressional District” is added before the name (code) of the entity Resident commissioner district (at large)—congressional district equivalent in Puerto Rico; “Resident Commissioner District (at Large)” appears as the name of the entity Delegate district (at large)—congressional district equivalent in the District of Columbia; “Delegate District (at Large)” appears as the name of the entity

93 � 94 � 95 � 96 �

97 � 98 � 99 � 9C � 9D � BG � BK � C1 �

C2 � C3 � C4 �

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-11

Area Characteristics—Con. Legal/Statistical Area Description Code—Con. CG � CN � CT � IB � IT � L1 � L2 � L3 � L4 � L5 � L6 � L8 � L9 � LL � LU � M0 � M1 � M2 � M3 � M4 � Consolidated government—consolidated city in Georgia (Augusta-Richmond County); “consolidated government” is appended to the name of the entity Corporation—incorporated place in West Virginia (Ranson); “corporation” is appended to the name of the entity Census tract—statistical area in the United States and Puerto Rico; “Census Tract” is added before the name (modified code) of the entity Tribal block group—statistical area within specified legal American Indian areas; “Tribal Block Group” is added before the name (code) of the entity Tribal census tract—statistical area within specified legal American Indian areas; “Tribal Census Tract” is added before the name (modified code) of the entity Ward—state legislative district (upper chamber) equivalent in the District of Columbia; “Ward” is added before the name of the entity Senatorial district—state legislative district (upper chamber) in Nevada; “Senatorial District” is appended to the name of the entity Assembly district—state legislative district (lower chamber) in California, Nevada, New York, and Wisconsin; “Assembly District” is added before the name of the entity General assembly district—state legislative district (lower chamber) in New Jersey; “General Assembly District” is added before the name of the entity State legislative district—state legislative district (lower chamber) in Maryland; “State Legislative District” is added before the name of the entity State legislative subdistrict—state legislative district (lower chamber) in Maryland; “State Legislative Subdistrict” is added before the name of the entity State senate district—state legislative district (upper chamber) in Vermont; “State Senate District” is appended to the name of the entity State house district—state legislative district (lower chamber) in Vermont; “State House District” is appended to the name of the entity State house district—state legislative district (lower chamber) in 41 states and Puerto Rico; “State House District” is added before the name of the entity State senate district—state legislative district (upper chamber) in 47 states and Puerto Rico; “State Senate District” is added before the name of the entity Combined statistical area—statistical area in 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; “CSA” is appended to the name of the entity Metropolitan statistical area—statistical area in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; “Metro Area” is appended to the name of the entity Micropolitan statistical area—statistical area in 47 states and Puerto Rico; “Micro Area” is appended to the name of the entity Metropolitan division—statistical area in 17 states and the District of Columbia; “Metro Division” is appended to the name of the entity Combined New England city and town area—statistical area in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont; “Combined NECTA” is appended to the name of the entity Metropolitan New England city and town area—statistical area in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont; “Metropolitan NECTA” is appended to the name of the entity Micropolitan New England city and town area—statistical area in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont; “Micropolitan NECTA” is appended to the name of the entity New England city and town area division—statistical area in Massachusetts and New Hampshire; “NECTA Division” is appended to the name of the entity

M5 �

M6 �

M7 �

4-12

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Area Characteristics—Con. Legal/Statistical Area Description Code—Con. MG � Metropolitan government—1) incorporated place in Tennessee (Lynchburg, Moore County); 2) consolidated city in Tennessee (Nashville-Davidson); “metropolitan government” is appended to the name of the entity Metro government—consolidated city in Kentucky (Louisville/Jefferson County); “metro government” is appended to the name of the entity Off-reservation trust land—trust land component of an American Indian reservation with associated trust land in 23 states; “Off-Reservation Trust Land” is appended to the name of the entity Public use microdata area (PUMA)—statistical area in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; “PUMA” is added before the name (code) of the entity Area—American Indian tribal subdivision in Arizona and Utah; “Area” is appended to the name of the entity Chapter—American Indian tribal subdivision in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah; “Chapter” is appended to the name of the entity Segment—American Indian tribal subdivision in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota; “Segment” is appended to the name of the entity Administrative area—American Indian tribal subdivision in Arizona; “Administrative Area” is appended to the name of the entity Addition—American Indian tribal subdivision in Wisconsin; “Addition” is appended to the name of the entity County district—statistical American Indian tribal subdivision in Oklahoma; “County District” is added before the name of the entity Urban county—incorporated place in Kentucky (Lexington-Fayette); “urban county” is appended to the name of the entity Unified government—1) incorporated place in Georgia (Cusseta-Chattahoochee County, Georgetown-Quitman County, and Webster County); 2) consolidated city in Georgia (AthensClarke County); “unified government” is appended to the name of the entity Voting district (VTD)—legal voting district in 32 states and Puerto Rico; “VTD” is added before the name of the entity Voting district (VTD)—legal voting district in 32 states; “VTD” is appended to the name of the entity ZIP code tabulation area (5-digit)—statistical area in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; “ZCTA5” is added before the name of the entity PARTFLAG Not a part Part 1 362 A/N

MT � OT �

P5 � T1 � T2 � T3 � TA � TB � TC � UC � UG �

V1 � V2 � Z5 �

Part Flag � W � P �

Special Area Codes Reserved � Urban Growth Area7 � State (ANSI)8 � County (ANSI)
8 � 8 �

RESERVE3 UGA STATENS COUNTYNS COUSUBNS PLACENS CONCITNS

6 5 8 8 8 8 8

363 369 374 382 390 398 406

A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N

County Subdivision (ANSI) Place (ANSI)8 � Consolidated City (ANSI)8 �

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-13

Special Area Codes—Con. American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land (ANSI)8 American Indian Tribal Subdivision (ANSI)8 � Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANSI) Subminor Civil Division (ANSI)
8 � 8 �

AIANHHNS AITSNS ANRCNS SUBMCDNS CD113

8 8 8 8 2

414 422 430 438 446

A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N

Congressional District (113th)7, 8, 23 � 01–53 � 00 � 98 � The actual congressional district number

Applies to states whose representative is elected “at large”; the state has only one representative in the U.S. House of Representatives
� Applies to areas that have an “at large” nonvoting delegate or resident commissioner in the U.S. House of Representatives CD114 2 448 A/N

Congressional District (114th)7, 8, 23 � 01–53 � 00 � 98 � The actual congressional district number

Applies to states whose representative is elected “at large”; the state has only one representative in the U.S. House of Representatives
� Applies to areas that have an “at large” nonvoting delegate or resident commissioner in the U.S. House of Representatives CD115 2 450 A/N

Congressional District (115th)7, 8, 23 � 01–53 � 00 � 98 � The actual congressional district number

Applies to states whose representative is elected “at large”; the state has only one representative in the U.S. House of Representatives
� Applies to areas that have an “at large” nonvoting delegate or resident commissioner in the U.S. House of Representatives

State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 2)7, 24 State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 3)7, 24 State Legislative District (Upper Chamber) (Year 4)7, 24 State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 2)7, 24 State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 3)7, 24 State Legislative District (Lower Chamber) (Year 4)7, 24 American Indian Area/Alaska Native Area/ Hawaiian Home Land Size Code9 Combined Statistical Area Size Code Combined NECTA Size Code9 �
9 �

SLDU2 SLDU3 SLDU4 SLDL2 SLDL3 SLDL4 AIANHHSC CSASC CNECTASC

3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2

452 455 458 461 464 467 470 472 474

A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N A/N

4-14

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Special Area Codes—Con. Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator � 1 2 9 Metropolitan Statistical Area Micropolitan Statistical Area Not in a Metropolitan or Micropolitan Statistical Area NMEMI 1 477 A/N MEMI 1 476 A/N

NECTA Metropolitan/Micropolitan Indicator � 1 2 9 Metropolitan New England City and Town Area Micropolitan New England City and Town Area Not in a New England City and Town Area

Public Use Microdata Area12 00001–99998 Reserved � Census PUMA Code

PUMA

5

478

A/N

RESERVED

18

483

A/N

ENDNOTES
1. A unique, six-character identifier for each file series. See “How to Use This Product” for further information. 2. Identifies the geographic level for which the data matrices on the summary file have been summarized. The summary level sequence chart describes the hierarchical arrangement of the specified geographic areas with other geographic areas, if any. The summary level must be used in combination with the geographic area codes to identify a specific geographic area (for example, summary level 050 and a specific state and county code must be used together to locate the data for a particular county). See “How to Use This Product” for further information. 3. � Indicates an iteration (repetition), for the specified summary level, of the data matrices on the summary file for the geographic components listed in the Geographic Component field. See “How to Use This Product” for further information. Geographic Component Description 00 01 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 28 29 30 31 32 43 44 Not a geographic component Urban Urban—in urbanized area Urban—in urbanized area of 5,000,000 or more population Urban—in urbanized area of 2,500,000 to 4,999,999 population Urban—in urbanized area of 1,000,000 to 2,499,999 population Urban—in urbanized area of 500,000 to 999,999 population Urban—in urbanized area of 250,000 to 499,999 population Urban—in urbanized area of 100,000 to 249,999 population Urban—in urbanized area of 50,000 to 99,999 population Urban—in urban cluster Urban—in urban cluster of 25,000 to 49,999 population Urban—in urban cluster of 10,000 to 24,999 population Urban—in urban cluster of 5,000 to 9,999 population Urban—in urban cluster of 2,500 to 4,999 population Rural Rural—place

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-15

ENDNOTES—Con.
Geographic Component Description—Con. 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 A0 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 A9 AA AB AC AD AE AF C0 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 CA 4-16 Rural—place of 2,500 or more population Rural—place of 1,000 to 2,499 population Rural—place of less than 1,000 population Rural—not in place Rural—farm Urban portion of extended place Rural portion of extended place American Indian Reservation and Trust Land—Federal American Indian Reservation and Trust Land—State Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Area Tribal Designated Statistical Area Alaska Native Village Statistical Area State Designated Tribal Statistical Area Hawaiian Home Land In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—in principal city In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—not in principal city In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—urban In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—urban—in urbanized area In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—urban—in urban cluster In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—rural In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 5,000,000 or more population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 2,500,000 to 4,999,999 population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 1,000,000 to 2,499,999 population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 500,000 to 999,999 population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 250,000 to 499,999 population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 100,000 to 249,999 population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 50,000 to 99,999 population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of 25,000 to 49,999 population In metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area of less than 25,000 population In metropolitan statistical area In metropolitan statistical area—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area—not in principal city In metropolitan statistical area—urban In metropolitan statistical area—urban—in urbanized area In metropolitan statistical area—urban—in urban cluster In metropolitan statistical area—rural In metropolitan statistical area of 5,000,000 or more population In metropolitan statistical area of 2,500,000 to 4,999,999 population In metropolitan statistical area of 1,000,000 to 2,499,999 population In metropolitan statistical area of 500,000 to 999,999 population Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

ENDNOTES—Con.
Geographic Component Description—Con. CB CC CD CE CF CG CH CJ CK CL CM CN CP CQ CR CS CT E0 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 E7 E8 E9 EA EB EC ED EE EF EG EH EJ G0 G1 G2 G3 G4 In metropolitan statistical area of 250,000 to 499,999 population In metropolitan statistical area of 100,000 to 249,999 population In metropolitan statistical area of less than 100,000 population In metropolitan statistical area of 5,000,000 or more population—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 5,000,000 or more population—not in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 2,500,000 to 4,999,999 population—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 2,500,000 to 4,999,999 population—not in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 1,000,000 to 2,499,999 population—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 1,000,000 to 2,499,999 population—not in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 500,000 to 999,999 population—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 500,000 to 999,999 population—not in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 250,000 to 499,999 population—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 250,000 to 499,999 population—not in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 100,000 to 249,999 population—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of 100,000 to 249,999 population—not in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of less than 100,000 population—in principal city In metropolitan statistical area of less than 100,000 population—not in principal city In micropolitan statistical area In micropolitan statistical area—in principal city In micropolitan statistical area—not in principal city In micropolitan statistical area—urban In micropolitan statistical area—urban—in urbanized area In micropolitan statistical area—urban—in urban cluster In micropolitan statistical area—rural In micropolitan statistical area of 100,000 or more population In micropolitan statistical area of 50,000 to 99,999 population In micropolitan statistical area of 25,000 to 49,999 population In micropolitan statistical area of less than 25,000 population In micropolitan statistical area of 100,000 or more population—in principal city In micropolitan statistical area of 100,000 or more population—not in principal city In micropolitan statistical area of 50,000 to 99,999 population—in principal city In micropolitan statistical area of 50,000 to 99,999 population—not in principal city In micropolitan statistical area of 25,000 to 49,999 population—in principal city In micropolitan statistical area of 25,000 to 49,999 population—not in principal city In micropolitan statistical area of less than 25,000 population—in principal city In micropolitan statistical area of less than 25,000 population—not in principal city Not in metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area Not in metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—urban Not in metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—urban—in urbanized area Not in metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—urban—in urban cluster Not in metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area—rural 4-17

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

ENDNOTES—Con.
Geographic Component Description—Con.
� H0 H1 H2 H3 H4 J0 L0 M0 M1 M2 M3 M4 M5 M6 P0 Not in metropolitan statistical area
� Not in metropolitan statistical area—urban
� Not in metropolitan statistical area—urban—in urbanized area
� Not in metropolitan statistical area—urban—in urban cluster
� Not in metropolitan statistical area—rural
� In combined statistical area
� Not in combined statistical area
� In New England city and town area
� In New England city and town area—in principal city
� In New England city and town area—not in principal city
� In New England city and town area—urban
� In New England city and town area—urban—in urbanized area
� In New England city and town area—urban—in urban cluster
� In New England city and town area—rural
� In combined New England city and town area


4. � Indicates an iteration (repetition), for the specified summary level, of the data matrices on the summary file for a population or housing characteristic. These iteration fields apply to Summary File 2 (SF 2) and the American Indian and Alaska Native Summary File only. 5. � The sequence number of the table file within the set of physical files for the state (i.e., the geographic header record file and one or more table files). See “How to Use This Product” for more information. 6. � The logical record is the complete record for a geographic entity defined by the summary level, but exclusive of the characteristic iteration. A logical record may have one or more parts (or segments). Each logical record has an assigned sequential integer number within the file. See “How to Use This Product” for further information. 7. � See Appendix A, “Geographic Terms and Concepts,” for definition of this field. 8. � The Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) codes were withdrawn as a standard in 2005. The Census Bureau, however, has renamed these codes as Federal Information Processing Series codes and retained the acronym. The two-digit state and congressional district and three-digit county FIPS codes (former FIPS 5, 9, and 6, respectively) are unchanged, but with oversight transferred to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The five-digit FIPS 55 codes are no longer a federal code standard; however they are retained in Census Bureau files as administrative codes and used as primary key codes for many geographic entity types. The U.S. Geological Survey has received ANSI oversight for a code standard that uses the Geographic Names Information System identifier (GNIS ID). The new ANSI standard using the GNIS ID as the official codes for Named Physical and Cultural Geographic Features of the United States and Puerto Rico also is included in Census Bureau files for state, county, county subdivision, place, consolidated city, American Indian area, Alaska Native area, Hawaiian home land, American Indian tribal subdivision, and subminor civil division or equivalent features. The Census Bureau references these fields in the geoheader as ANSI codes and using the term National Standard code. The codes represent the official numeric GNIS ID as an eight-digit character field with leading zeroes. The Census Bureau treats the state and county or equivalent area ANSI codes as supplemental standard codes. The following lists the published code standards used for the 2010 Census (with its associated Census 2000 standard): • � INCITS.38-200x (R2004), Codes for the Identification of the States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Insular Areas of the United States (Formerly FIPS 5-2) • � INCITS.31-200x (R2007), Codes for the Identification of Counties and Equivalent Areas of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Insular Areas of the United States (Formerly FIPS 6-4) 4-18 Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

ENDNOTES—Con.
• � INCITS.454-200x, Codes for the Identification of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas and Related Areas of the United States and Puerto Rico (Formerly FIPS 8-6) • � INCITS 455-200x, Codes for the Identification of Congressional Districts and Equivalent Areas of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Insular Areas (Formerly FIPS 9-1) • � INCITS 446-2008, (GNIS) Identifying Attributes for Named Physical and Cultural Geographic Features (Except Roads and Highways) of the United States, Its Territories, Outlying Areas, and Freely Associated Areas, and the Waters of the Same to the Limit of the Twelve-Mile Statutory Zone (Formerly FIPS 55-4). Note: INCITS refers to InterNational Committee for Information Technology Standards. 9. � Identifies areas within predetermined population ranges. The actual codes and ranges are common to all entities with a size code field. The complete list of size codes follows: 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Not in universe 0 1–24 25–99 100–199 200–249 250–299 300–499 500–999 1,000–1,499 1,500–1,999 2,000–2,499 2,500–4,999 5,000–9,999 10,000–19,999 20,000–24,999 25,000–49,999 50,000–99,999 100,000–249,999 250,000–499,999 500,000–999,999 1,000,000–2,499,999 2,500,000–4,999,999 5,000,000 or more

The size code fields are not filled for the Demographic Profile Summary File or Redistricting Data Summary File products. 10. Codes in unspecified arrangement for U.S. Census Bureau use. 11. Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) 55 codes are assigned by state. Because American Indian areas and tribal subdivisions can exist in more than one state, multiple FIPS 55 codes can exist for the entity. 12. Urban Areas, Urban/Rural classification, ZIP Code Tabulation Areas, and Public Use Microdata Areas are not available in the Demographic Profile Summary File or Redistricting Data Summary File products. 13. Blank values in the Congressional District (111th) field indicate areas where no congressional district was assigned by state redistricting officials. 14. State legislative district codes have three characters and can include a hyphen (-). The code ZZZ indicates state legislative districts not defined. In the District of Columbia and Nebraska, both of which have a single legislative body, the state legislative districts are reported as upper chamber districts, and the lower chamber districts are coded as 999.

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-19

ENDNOTES—Con.
15. Voting district codes can have one to six characters including special characters of a hyphen (-), dot (.), and forward slash (/). If the code contains less than six characters, the field is right-justified with leading blanks. The code ZZZZZZ indicates voting district not defined in a county or equivalent area containing one or more defined voting districts. A code of six blanks is used in Kentucky, Rhode Island, Oregon (except Multnomah County), and 14 of the 50 counties in Montana, where participants did not define voting districts for entire states or counties. 16. Land area measurement in square meters. The accuracy of the area measurement is limited by the inaccuracy inherent in the mapping of the various boundary features in the Census Bureau’s geographic database. Land area includes areas classified as intermittent water, swamps, and glaciers, which appear on census maps and in the Census Bureau’s geographic database as hydrographic features. Square miles can be derived by dividing square meters by 2,589,988. See Appendix A, “Geographic Terms and Concepts,” for definition of this field. 17. Water area measurement in square meters. The accuracy of the area measurement is limited by the inaccuracy inherent in the mapping of the various boundary features in the Census Bureau’s geographic database. Water area excludes areas classified as intermittent water, swamps, and glaciers, which are treated as land even though they appear on census maps and in the Census Bureau’s geographic database as hydrographic features. Square miles can be derived by dividing square meters by 2,589,988. See Appendix A, “Geographic Terms and Concepts,” for definition of this field. 18. Name of the lowest-level entity represented by the summary level. In addition to the name of the entity, the name field contains the legal/statistical area description (LSAD), when appropriate, and sometimes contains the state abbreviation. For legal entities, the name is the one reported to the U.S. Census Bureau in the Boundary and Annexation Survey or by other appropriate sources, such as state education officials for school districts. For statistical entities, the name is determined by the Office of Management and Budget for metropolitan and micropolitan areas. The remaining statistical area names usually are supplied by tribal, state, or local sources according to published criteria. For redistricting data entities, names are reported by the state redistricting data liaison. For other areas, the name is determined by the local officials, usually in cooperation with the U.S. Census Bureau. When the summary level data represent only part of the area specified in the name, the name usually will have “(part)” appended to the name/code terminology to designate that this entry for the entity represents only a part of the total entity. 19. The total number of persons enumerated in the specified geographic entity as determined in the 100 percent processing. 20. The total number of housing units enumerated in the specified geographic entity as determined in the 100 percent processing. 21. Latitude in degrees, to seven decimal places, of a point within the geographic area represented by the summary level. The character immediately preceding the first digit of the latitude of an internal point identifies the direction (hemisphere): a plus sign (+) indicates the Northern Hemisphere; a minus sign (–) indicates the Southern Hemisphere. See Appendix A, “Geographic Terms and Concepts,” for definition of this field. 22. Longitude in degrees, to seven decimal places, of a point within the geographic area represented by the summary level. The character immediately preceding the first digit of the longitude of an internal point identifies the direction (hemisphere): a plus sign (+) indicates the Eastern hemisphere; a minus sign (–) indicates the Western Hemisphere. A point on the 180th meridian is assigned to the Western Hemisphere (–180.0000000). See Appendix A, “Geographic Terms and Concepts,” for definition of this field. 23. Congressional District (113th), Congressional District (114th), and Congressional District (115th) are reserved for areas established after reapportionment and redistricting. 24. State Legislative District—Upper and Lower Chamber—for Year 2, 3, and 4 are reserved for areas established after redistricting.

4-20

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

TABLE (MATRIX) SECTION
The 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File is provided as a set, including one geographic header file and one data file. The data file is presented in the table (matrix) section and is in ASCII format with variable length fields delimited by commas. The data fields are numeric with the maximum size shown in MAX SIZE. Each data file begins with a subset of fields from the geographic header file. They are file identification (FILEID), state/U.S. abbreviation (STUSAB), characteristic iteration (CHARITER), two-character file sequence number (CIFSN), and a logical record number (LOGRECNO). Data dictionary reference name

Table number

Table contents

Segment

Max size

File 01—File Linking Fields (comma delimited). These fields link File 01 with the geographic header. Data dictionary reference name FILEID STUSAB CHARITER CIFSN LOGRECNO

Field name

Max size 6 2 3 2 7

Data type A/N A A/N A/N N

File Identification State/U.S. Abbreviation (USPS) Characteristic Iteration Characteristic Iteration File Sequence Number Logical Record Number DPSF1. SEX AND AGE [57] Universe: Total population Total: Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over Male: Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years

dpsf0010001 dpsf0010002 dpsf0010003 dpsf0010004 dpsf0010005 dpsf0010006 dpsf0010007 dpsf0010008 dpsf0010009 dpsf0010010 dpsf0010011 dpsf0010012 dpsf0010013 dpsf0010014 dpsf0010015 dpsf0010016 dpsf0010017 dpsf0010018 dpsf0010019 dpsf0010020 dpsf0010021 dpsf0010022 dpsf0010023 dpsf0010024 dpsf0010025 dpsf0010026 dpsf0010027 dpsf0010028 dpsf0010029

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 4-21

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

TABLE (MATRIX) SECTION—Con.
Data dictionary reference name

Table number DPSF1.

Table contents SEX AND AGE [57]—Con. Total—Con. Male—Con. 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over Female: Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over MEDIAN AGE BY SEX [3] (1 expressed decimal) Universe: Total population Median age— Both sexes Male Female SEX FOR THE POPULATION 16 YEARS AND OVER [3] Universe: Population 16 years and over Total: Male Female SEX FOR THE POPULATION 18 YEARS AND OVER [3] Universe: Population 18 years and over Total: Male Female

Segment

Max size

dpsf0010030 dpsf0010031 dpsf0010032 dpsf0010033 dpsf0010034 dpsf0010035 dpsf0010036 dpsf0010037 dpsf0010038 dpsf0010039 dpsf0010040 dpsf0010041 dpsf0010042 dpsf0010043 dpsf0010044 dpsf0010045 dpsf0010046 dpsf0010047 dpsf0010048 dpsf0010049 dpsf0010050 dpsf0010051 dpsf0010052 dpsf0010053 dpsf0010054 dpsf0010055 dpsf0010056 dpsf0010057

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

DPSF2.

dpsf0020001 dpsf0020002 dpsf0020003

1 1 1

9 9 9

DPSF3.

dpsf0030001 dpsf0030002 dpsf0030003

1 1 1

9 9 9

DPSF4.

dpsf0040001 dpsf0040002 dpsf0040003

1 1 1

9 9 9

4-22

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

TABLE (MATRIX) SECTION—Con.
Data dictionary reference name

Table number DPSF5.

Table contents SEX FOR THE POPULATION 21 YEARS AND OVER [3] Universe: Population 21 years and over Total: Male Female SEX FOR THE POPULATION 62 YEARS AND OVER [3] Universe: Population 62 years and over Total: Male Female SEX FOR THE POPULATION 65 YEARS AND OVER [3] Universe: Population 65 years and over Total: Male Female RACE [24] Universe: Total population Total: Population of one race: White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian: Asian Indian Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Vietnamese Other Asian Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: Native Hawaiian Guamanian or Chamorro Samoan Other Pacific Islander Some Other Race Population of Two or More Races White; American Indian and Alaska Native White; Asian White; Black or African American White; Some Other Race RACE (TOTAL RACES TALLIED) [6] Universe: Total races tallied White alone or in combination with one or more other races Black or African American alone or in combination with one or more other races

Segment

Max size

dpsf0050001 dpsf0050002 dpsf0050003

1 1 1

9 9 9

DPSF6.

dpsf0060001 dpsf0060002 dpsf0060003

1 1 1

9 9 9

DPSF7.

dpsf0070001 dpsf0070002 dpsf0070003

1 1 1

9 9 9

DPSF8.

dpsf0080001 dpsf0080002 dpsf0080003 dpsf0080004 dpsf0080005 dpsf0080006 dpsf0080007 dpsf0080008 dpsf0080009 dpsf0080010 dpsf0080011 dpsf0080012 dpsf0080013 dpsf0080014 dpsf0080015 dpsf0080016 dpsf0080017 dpsf0080018 dpsf0080019 dpsf0080020 dpsf0080021 dpsf0080022 dpsf0080023 dpsf0080024

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

DPSF9.

dpsf0090001 dpsf0090002

1 1

9 9 4-23

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

TABLE (MATRIX) SECTION—Con.
Data dictionary reference name

Table number DPSF9.

Table contents RACE (TOTAL RACES TALLIED) [6]—Con. American Indian and Alaska Native alone or in combination with one or more other races Asian alone or in combination with one or more other races Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone or in combination with one or more other races Some Other Race alone or in combination with one or more other races HISPANIC OR LATINO BY SPECIFIC ORIGIN [7] Universe: Total population Total: Hispanic or Latino (of any race): Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban Other Hispanic or Latino Not Hispanic or Latino HISPANIC OR LATINO AND RACE [17] Universe: Total population Total: Hispanic or Latino: White alone Black or African American alone American Indian and Alaska Native alone Asian alone Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone Some Other Race alone Two or More Races Not Hispanic or Latino: White alone Black or African American alone American Indian and Alaska Native alone Asian alone Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone Some Other Race alone Two or More Races RELATIONSHIP [20] Universe: Total population Total: In households: Householder Spouse Child Own child under 18 years Other relatives Under 18 years 65 years and over

Segment

Max size

dpsf0090003 dpsf0090004 dpsf0090005 dpsf0090006

1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9

DPSF10.

dpsf0100001 dpsf0100002 dpsf0100003 dpsf0100004 dpsf0100005 dpsf0100006 dpsf0100007

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9

DPSF11.

dpsf0110001 dpsf0110002 dpsf0110003 dpsf0110004 dpsf0110005 dpsf0110006 dpsf0110007 dpsf0110008 dpsf0110009 dpsf0110010 dpsf0110011 dpsf0110012 dpsf0110013 dpsf0110014 dpsf0110015 dpsf0110016 dpsf0110017

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

DPSF12.

dpsf0120001 dpsf0120002 dpsf0120003 dpsf0120004 dpsf0120005 dpsf0120006 dpsf0120007 dpsf0120008 dpsf0120009

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

4-24

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

TABLE (MATRIX) SECTION—Con.
Data dictionary reference name

Table number DPSF12.

Table contents RELATIONSHIP [20]—Con. Total—Con. In households—Con. Nonrelatives Under 18 years 65 years and over Unmarried partner In group quarters: Institutionalized population: Male Female Noninstitutionalized population: Male Female HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE [15] Universe: Households Total: Family households (families) With own children under 18 years Husband-wife family With own children under 18 years Male householder, no wife present With own children under 18 years Female householder, no husband present With own children under 18 years Nonfamily households Householder living alone: Male 65 years and over Female 65 years and over HOUSEHOLDS WITH INDIVIDUALS UNDER 18 YEARS [1] Universe: Households with individuals under 18 years Total HOUSEHOLDS WITH INDIVIDUALS 65 YEARS AND OVER [1] Universe: Households with individuals 65 years and over Total AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE [1] (2 expressed decimals) Universe: Households Average household size AVERAGE FAMILY SIZE [1] (2 expressed decimals) Universe: Families Average family size

Segment

Max size

dpsf0120010 dpsf0120011 dpsf0120012 dpsf0120013 dpsf0120014 dpsf0120015 dpsf0120016 dpsf0120017 dpsf0120018 dpsf0120019 dpsf0120020

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

DPSF13.

dpsf0130001 dpsf0130002 dpsf0130003 dpsf0130004 dpsf0130005 dpsf0130006 dpsf0130007 dpsf0130008 dpsf0130009 dpsf0130010 dpsf0130011 dpsf0130012 dpsf0130013 dpsf0130014 dpsf0130015

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

DPSF14.

dpsf0140001

1

9

DPSF15.

dpsf0150001

1

9

DPSF16.

dpsf0160001

1

9

DPSF17.

dpsf0170001

1

9

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4-25

TABLE (MATRIX) SECTION—Con.
Data dictionary reference name

Table number DPSF18.

Table contents HOUSING OCCUPANCY [9] Universe: Total housing units Total: Occupied housing units Vacant housing units: For rent Rented, not occupied For sale only Sold, not occupied For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use All other vacants

Segment

Max size

dpsf0180001 dpsf0180002 dpsf0180003 dpsf0180004 dpsf0180005 dpsf0180006 dpsf0180007 dpsf0180008 dpsf0180009

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

DPSF19.

HOMEOWNER VACANCY RATE [1] (1 expressed decimal) Universe: Owner-occupied, vacant for sale, and vacant sold but not occupied housing units Homeowner vacancy rate (percent) dpsf0190001 RENTAL VACANCY RATE [1] (1 expressed decimal) Universe: Renter-occupied, vacant for rent, and vacant rented but not occupied housing units Rental vacancy rate (percent) HOUSING TENURE [3] Universe: Occupied housing units Total: Owner-occupied housing units Renter-occupied housing units POPULATION IN OCCUPIED HOUSING UNITS BY TENURE [2] Universe: Population in occupied housing units Owner-occupied housing units Renter-occupied housing units AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE OF OCCUPIED HOUSING UNITS BY TENURE [2] (2 expressed decimals) Universe: Occupied housing units Average household size— Owner-occupied Renter-occupied

1

9

DPSF20.

dpsf0200001

1

9

DPSF21.

dpsf0210001 dpsf0210002 dpsf0210003

1 1 1

9 9 9

DPSF22.

dpsf0220001 dpsf0220002

1 1

9 9

DPSF23.

dpsf0230001 dpsf0230002

1 1

9 9

4-26

Data Dictionary
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Chapter 5. 2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data
CONTENTS
Master Address File Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local Update of Census Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Address Canvassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Group Quarters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Update/Leave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresponse Followup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other Address and Geocoding Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vacant/Delete Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remote Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Group Quarters Enumeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service-Based Enumeration and Enumeration at Transitory Locations Confidentiality of the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Title 13 U.S. Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disclosure Avoidance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Swapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonsampling Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Types of Nonsampling Error. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reduction of Nonsampling Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resolving Multiple Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Count Imputation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Imputation Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
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MASTER ADDRESS FILE DEVELOPMENT
As in Census 2000, the base for the address list for the 2010 Census was the address list from the previous census. Various updates were made to the address list during the intervening decade. The primary source of new addresses after Census 2000 was the Delivery Sequence File (DSF) from the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). The U.S. Census Bureau acquired this file of all mailing addresses in the United States and updated the Master Address File (MAF) twice a year (March and October) until February 2010. Addresses must be associated with a block to be included in the census. The process of associating these addresses with a block is called geocoding. For the Census Bureau, the file where geographic information is contained is the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing System (TIGER®). During this decade, the MAF and TIGER have been integrated into the MAF/TIGER® database (MTdb). For the processing of the DSF records, city-style addresses (containing a house number and street name) of residential units were applied to the MAF in those blocks that, in general terms, had been found to have a majority of city-style addresses in order that duplication would not result from the addition of these addresses. Another file from the USPS, the Locatable Address Conversion System (LACS), contained linkages for addresses that had been changed. Use of this file by the Census Bureau allowed for old and new addresses to be linked in the MTdb. This was especially desirable for linking the non-city-style addresses that had been converted to city-style addresses.

2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data
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Various field operations, such as census tests and the update of rural area addresses for the American Community Survey, led to localized updates or updates in specific types of areas. In particular, updating addresses with post office box type addresses in the rural area was meant to balance the updating of the MTdb with city-style addresses from the DSF. Local Update of Census Addresses The first large-scale update of addresses for the decennial census was the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) program. In this program, governmental units (GUs) were allowed to participate in updating the address list in three different ways. One option allowed for review of the Census Bureau’s address list, while the other options allowed only for the GUs to submit a list of addresses to the Census Bureau. Under any of these options, new addresses submitted by the GUs were included on the subsequent address list. These addresses could be for housing units (HUs) or for group quarters (GQs). The submitted addresses were then included in the universe for validation in the next major address list development operation, Address Canvassing, which occurred between April and July 2009. Address Canvassing Address Canvassing was conducted in all areas of the United States and Puerto Rico except in the areas that were designated for Remote Alaska or Remote Update Enumerate in the census. Address Canvassing was a dependent check of the list of addresses, as well as of the maps. The Address Canvassing operation was performed using automation, which allowed for the integration of address and map updates, as well as the imposition of rules on what constitutes a minimum allowable address and the collection of particular geographic fields. The allowable actions on the addresses in Address Canvassing were validate, nonresidential, delete, duplicate, address correction, and an action for designating possible GQs. Adds to the list were also allowed. All deletes and duplicates were validated during the next phase of the operation, called delete verification. The results from Address Canvassing were incorporated into the MTdb. One of the first uses of these results was for creating feedback to the GUs participating in LUCA. The results from processing the Address Canvassing updates were also used for the creation of the initial census address list starting in July 2009, the initial Universe Control and Management (UC&M) file. Printing of the questionnaires used this address list. Group Quarters The results of Address Canvassing also contributed to the universe for the next operation, which was Group Quarters Validation (GQV). The procedures for creating the address list of GQs were significantly different for the 2010 Census as opposed to previous censuses. In order to reduce duplication and geographic data errors, the address lists of HUs and GQs were integrated in the MTdb. The list of potential GQs going into GQV was the accumulation of GQ addresses from Census 2000, GQ addresses acquired from various sources, and addresses listed as Other Living Quarters (potential GQs) in Address Canvassing. Cases designated as GQs through other sources were intended to be sent to GQV regardless of the Address Canvassing status. However, it was discovered during processing of the LUCA updates that GUs often listed apartment buildings or commercial units as GQs. The schedule for completing GQV, in October 2009, was one of the riskiest in the census. For these units to remain on the list of units to be checked in GQV put timely completion of the operation at risk, and thus, the entire census schedule. Therefore, from the LUCA updates making their way to GQV, only the units with facility names that included special key names known to be associated with group quarters were designated for follow-up in GQV unless they were also designated as possible GQs in Address Canvassing. The addresses in GQV could receive an action of GQ— along with the type of GQ, HU, nonresidential, vacant, transient (meaning the location was connected to a geographic area that should be enumerated in the Enumeration at Transitory Locations operation), delete, or duplicate. The results from GQV were processed in November 2009. Updates were made to the initial UC&M, resulting in the enumeration UC&M, or the full census universe. Units that were marked as housing units 5-2 2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data
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in GQV were designated as adds to the initial UC&M universe. Other adds to this universe resulted from DSF updates that had occurred between the creation of the Address List for Address Canvassing and the creation of the enumeration UC&M. There were three DSFs contributing new adds to this UC&M file. A supplemental printing of addressed questionnaires resulted from this updated file. These questionnaires were either added to the mail stream at the point that questionnaires were delivered by the USPS or sent to the Local Census Offices in those areas where the added addresses occurred in Update/Leave areas. Update/Leave Update/Leave (U/L) is an operation in which questionnaires are hand-delivered due to potential problems with postal delivery of addresses. The presence of staff in the field for this delivery allows the simultaneous updating of the address lists and maps. Addresses on the address list in U/L areas received the actions of verify, correction, nonresidential, delete, or duplicate. Maps could also receive updates. The operation occurred between March 1 and April 2, 2010. There were approximately 12 million housing units in stateside U/L areas, and Puerto Rico (about 1.6 million addresses) was entirely U/L. There was no check on the deletes and duplicates designated in this operation because the operation was performed on paper and there was a timing issue with processing. The status of nonresponding units that were in the enumeration universe was checked in the later Nonresponse Followup operation. Nonresponse Followup Nonresponse Followup (NRFU) is the operation in which nonresponding households from both mailout/ mailback and U/L areas are followed up and enumerated, if possible. Other options within NRFU are to mark the unit vacant (either a regular vacant or seasonal), delete, or duplicate. It is also possible to add units and perform the enumeration on them. The maps also may be updated. The status of regular vacants and deletes is checked in the subsequent operation, the Vacant/Delete Check. Other Address and Geocoding Operations No additional updates were made to the enumeration universe in the UC&M before the start of NRFU. However, there were still operations and processes adding addresses to the MTdb, or in some cases, adding geographic data that allowed the addresses to be included in the census. These were: 1) LUCA Appeals; 2) New Construction; 3) HU Address Review; 4) Count Review; 5) Spring 2010 DSF; 6) newly geocoded addresses; 7) addresses resulting from a follow-up of INFO-COMMs (standardized forms used to document problems, issues, and unusual situations or to ask questions about procedures and other workrelated matters by field staff) submitted during Address Canvassing; and 8) U/L added addresses. LUCA Appeals was a process where a GU that participated in LUCA submitted challenges to the outputs from Address Canvassing. The challenged addresses were reviewed, and those that were approved were accepted back onto the census list. New Construction was an effort similar to LUCA in which the participating GU submitted addresses that represented newly constructed and livable housing. The HU Address Review was a headquarters review of addresses coming from a variety of sources. In general, these were people who reported situations, such as large apartment buildings missing from the census universe, where the report made it to headquarters personnel. Staff in the Geography Division researched these address submissions to determine if they were truly missing from the census address list and, if so, why. When it was found that addresses should be included on the census address list and did not duplicate other addresses already on the census address list, they were submitted for processing in the same format as files from the New Construction and Count Review programs. Count Review was another effort undertaken with governmental representatives with an eye toward identifying housing that was missing from the list.

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The Spring 2010 DSF contained mailable addresses as of February 2010. Residential addresses appearing on this list that were not already included in the MTdb were assumed to represent mostly newly constructed units. For the next source of addresses on this update, there were a few million addresses residing on the MTdb that had not yet been geocoded. It was assumed that these addresses would be added in Address Canvassing if they truly existed. However, when Address Canvassing was completed and only about half of the addresses had been added in the operation, and at the same time there were some concerns about the coverage of the list, the Census Bureau undertook an independent effort in early 2010 to find geocodes for these units after first checking that the addresses were not represented on the list in another form. The next addition of addresses resulted from Address Canvassing INFO-COMMs. The design of the automated instrument did not allow for units to be added during the Quality Control (QC) phase of the operation if the assignment had passed QC. Nevertheless, in some areas QC staff found large numbers of missing addresses that were not picked up within the QC sample. They filled out an INFO-COMM to apprise the local office staff of the situation. In early 2010, there was an effort to identify which of these cases were really missing units and where they should be added to the list. An input file that mimicked the inputs of the other operations adding addresses was created for these units to be added to the census list in this process, as well. The final source of new addresses listed here was U/L adds. These are units that did not appear on the list used for U/L but that were identified as valid in the field. Questionnaires were delivered to these units, and updates were made to the MTdb based on the results of this operation. However, the processing of U/L actions could not be completed in time to update the NRFU universe without automation. Thus, in order to perform enumeration on U/L adds for households that did not return the form, the units needed to be included in the subsequent updated universe. Vacant/Delete Check These addresses just described made it into the enumeration universe for the first time for the Vacant/ Delete Check (VDC). Not all of these addresses required a visit for enumeration during the VDC. In particular, if a householder at an address added during U/L mailed in the form in time, no additional visit was required. In addition, an operation dubbed the Late Add Mailing resulted in many of these addresses being mailed forms earlier than enumeration would have occurred. In particular, the LUCA Appeals addresses, the addresses from the most recent DSF that were geocoded to a block, and the addresses that were newly geocoded during the geocoding research were placed on a file for which questionnaires were printed and mailed. A unique processing ID was printed on each of these questionnaires, which enabled the questionnaires to be linked up to the census ID that was used when the units were added to the VDC universe. This also allowed for the information about receipt of a questionnaire to be passed back to the universe file and removed from the universe of follow-up cases. Therefore, the final list of units requiring follow-up and potential enumeration in VDC were the regular vacants and deletes as designated in NRFU and the new units added from the seven sources listed above for which no questionnaire was received by the time of universe creation. The universe of addresses printed within the address registers were all units that appeared in the enumeration universe plus the units added from the seven sources listed. One category of new address that did not appear on the VDC listing pages, due to timing, were the units that were added during NRFU. Field Verification There was one final check of particular addresses in the field. This operation is called Field Verification, and it was performed in the 2010 Census much as it was in Census 2000. Only specific addresses within the entire universe of addresses were acted on during this status check. Units designated for follow-up in this operation received a status of valid (or verify), delete, or duplicate. The addresses in the universe for this check in the 2010 Census included two categories of cases. The first was a check of new addresses that resulted from Be Counted forms or calls to the Telephone Questionnaire Assistance line that did not 5-4 2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data
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have a related census ID. These addresses needed to be verified in the field before they were added to the census. They must be associated with a particular block before they could be sent for field work. The second category of cases was units that potentially needed to be removed from the universe based on the identification of duplicated persons in those units. Person duplication occurs for many reasons, one of which is duplication of housing units on the address list. Units linked by person matching that are within a close geographic area have been found in testing to be highly associated with housing-level problems. However, there are other situations that can lead to such person duplication that are not housing unit duplication, so these units identified as potential duplicates needed to be field checked before they could be safely removed from the census address list. For those units that were designated as duplicates, an indicator of which unit on the list that unit duplicated was collected. Remote Areas The descriptions above cover the vast majority of housing units in the United States and in all of Puerto Rico. However, there are some particularly remote or problematic areas that were designated for other types of enumeration. The first of these to start was Remote Alaska. In this operation, enumeration was scheduled to occur in fishing and hunting villages before the ice broke and the villagers scattered from their winter homes. Other areas in Alaska that were remote but where the population is stationary were designated for Remote Update/Enumerate. The methodology is the same for these two operations. The incoming address list was based on what was there during Census 2000. Updates were made to the address list and maps, and the households were enumerated at the same time. An area of Maine was also designated for Remote Update/Enumerate. Some areas of the country (covering about 1.5 million addresses) were designated for Update/Enumerate. In these areas, Address Canvassing was completed, but it was felt that enumeration by Mailout/Mailback or U/L would have been problematic. These areas could be seasonal housing, federally designated tribal areas, or areas with particularly low predicted response rates based on various demographic factors. In Update/Enumerate, as in Remote Update/Enumerate and Remote Alaska, updates were made to the address list and maps at the same time that enumeration was completed. In general, this is the last operation that occurs in these areas, although it is possible for units in the Field Verification universe to be in these areas.

GROUP QUARTERS ENUMERATION
A list of nonstandard housing, such as college dormitories and group homes, was tracked in the MTdb in conjunction with the housing unit list. The list of these GQs was compiled from various sources, including the Census 2000 list of GQs, LUCA participants, the Federal-State Cooperative for Population Estimates, and Address Canvassing. The GQV of these addresses occurred in October 2009, as described above. The units that remained GQs after this check were included in Group Quarters Advance Visit (GQAV), and then Group Quarters Enumeration (GQE). In GQE, individual census questionnaires—meaning individual questionnaires for each person—were distributed at the GQs and collected by the field staff. A count of persons associated with a particular GQ resulted from this operation.

SERVICE-BASED ENUMERATION AND ENUMERATION AT TRANSITORY LOCATIONS
Service-Based Enumeration (SBE) was designed to account for the enumeration of persons without a usual residence that use service facilities (i.e., shelters, soup kitchens, and mobile food vans). In the 2010 Census, 3 days (March 29–31) were designated for these enumeration activities. Different types of facilities were designated for different days. Only persons using the service facility on the interview day were enumerated at that location. It was possible for people to be counted in more than one location due to use of different facilities on subsequent days. There is an unduplication of SBE persons for the purpose of minimizing this duplication.

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People experiencing homelessness could also complete a Be Counted form and check the box indicating this status. To the extent that such persons could be associated with a state and county based on the information provided on the form, they will be counted at a Group Quarters within that state and county. Certain areas were designated for Enumeration at Transitory Locations (ETL). These included RV parks and marinas where people were living as of Census Day if people living in these locations had no other permanent place to stay. The locations where ETL took place were designated in GQAV. When people were enumerated in ETL, the particular location was considered a housing unit.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF THE DATA
The Census Bureau has modified some data in this data release to protect confidentiality. Title 13 U.S. Code, Section 9, prohibits the Census Bureau from publishing results in which an individual’s data can be identified. The Census Bureau’s internal Disclosure Review Board monitors the disclosure review process and sets the confidentiality rules for all data releases. A checklist approach is used to ensure that all potential risks are considered and addressed. A list of possible concerns is created and the Disclosure Review Board makes sure that the appropriate steps are taken to assure the confidentiality of the data. Title 13 U.S. Code Title 13 of the U.S. Code authorizes the Census Bureau to conduct surveys and censuses and mandates that any information obtained from private individuals and establishments remains confidential. Section 9 of Title 13 prohibits the Census Bureau from releasing “any publication whereby the data furnished by any particular establishment or individual under this title can be identified.” Section 214 of Title 13, as modified by the Federal Sentencing Reform Act, imposes a fine of not more than $250,000 and/or imprisonment of not more than 5 years for publication or communication in violation of Section 9. Disclosure Avoidance Disclosure avoidance is the process of disguising data to protect confidentiality. A disclosure of data occurs when someone can use published statistical information to identify an individual who provided information under a pledge of confidentiality. Using disclosure avoidance, the Census Bureau modifies or removes all of the characteristics that put confidential information at risk for disclosure. Although it may appear that a table shows information about a specific individual, the Census Bureau has taken steps (such as data swapping) to disguise the original data while making sure the results are useful. Data Swapping Data swapping is a method of disclosure avoidance designed to protect confidentiality in tables of frequency data (the number or percentage of the population with certain characteristics). Data swapping is done by editing the source data or exchanging records for a sample of cases. A sample of households is selected and matched on a set of selected key variables with households in neighboring geographic areas (geographic areas with a small population) that have similar characteristics (same number of adults, same number of children, etc.). Because the swap often occurs within a geographic area with a small population, there is no effect on the marginal totals for the geographic area with a small population or for totals that include data from multiple geographic areas with small populations. Because of data swapping, users should not assume that tables with cells having a value of one or two reveal information about specific individuals.

NONSAMPLING ERROR
In any large-scale statistical operation, such as the 2010 Census, human- and computer-related errors occur. These errors are commonly referred to as nonsampling errors. Such errors include not enumerating every household or every person in the population, not obtaining all required information from the respondents, obtaining incorrect or inconsistent information, and recording information incorrectly. In 5-6 2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data
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addition, errors can occur during the field review of the enumerators’ work, during clerical handling of the census questionnaires, or during the electronic processing of the questionnaires. While it is impossible to completely eliminate nonsampling error from an operation as large and complex as the decennial census, the Census Bureau attempts to control the sources of such error during the collection and processing operations. Described below are the primary sources of nonsampling error and the programs instituted to control this error in the 2010 Census. The success of these programs, however, was contingent upon how well the instructions actually were carried out during the census. Types of Nonsampling Error Nonresponse Nonresponse to particular questions on the census questionnaire or the failure to obtain any information for a housing unit allows for the introduction of bias into the data because the characteristics of the nonrespondents have not been observed and may differ from those reported by respondents. As a result, any imputation procedure using respondent data may not completely reflect these differences either at the elemental level (individual person or housing unit) or on the average. Some protection against the introduction of large biases is afforded by minimizing nonresponse. Characteristics for the nonresponses were imputed by using reported data for a person or housing unit with similar characteristics. Respondent and Enumerator Error The person answering the mail questionnaire for a household or responding to the questions posed by an enumerator could serve as a source of error, although the question wording was extensively tested in several experimental studies prior to the census. The mail respondent may overlook or misunderstand a question or answer a question in a way that cannot be interpreted correctly by the data capture system. The enumerator may also misinterpret or otherwise incorrectly record information given by a respondent or may fail to collect some of the information for a person or household. To control problems such as these with the field enumeration, the work of enumerators was monitored carefully. Field staff were prepared for their tasks by using standardized training packages that included hands-on experience in using census materials. A sample of the households interviewed by each enumerator were reinterviewed to control for the possibility of fabricated data being submitted by enumerators. Processing Error The many phases involved in processing the census data represent potential sources for the introduction of nonsampling error. The processing of the census questionnaires completed by enumerators included field review by the crew leader, check-in, and transmittal of completed questionnaires. No field reviews were done on the mail return questionnaires for this census. Error may also be introduced by the misinterpretation of data by the data capture system or the failure to capture all the information that the respondents or enumerators provided on the forms. Write-in entries go through coding operations, which may also be a source of processing error in the data. Many of the various field, coding, and computer operations undergo a number of quality control checks to help ensure their accurate application. Reduction of Nonsampling Error To reduce various types of nonsampling errors, a number of techniques were implemented during the planning, development of the mailing address list, data collection, and data processing activities. Quality assurance methods were used throughout the data collection and processing phases of the census to improve the quality of the data. A reinterview program was implemented to minimize the errors in the data collection phase for enumerator-filled questionnaires.

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Several coverage improvement programs were implemented during the development of the census address list and census enumeration and processing to minimize undercoverage of the population and housing units. These programs were developed based on experience from previous decennial censuses and results from the 2010 Census testing cycle. • � Be Counted questionnaires, unaddressed forms requesting all questionnaire items plus a few additional items, were available in public locations for people who believed they were not otherwise counted. • An introductory letter was sent to all mailout/mailback addresses and many addresses in update/leave areas prior to the mailing of the census form. A reminder postcard was also sent to these addresses. • A replacement questionnaire was sent to nonresponding addresses in selected areas. • Bilingual English/Spanish questionnaires were sent to all addresses in selected areas. • � Forms in Spanish, Chinese (simplified), Korean, Russian, and Vietnamese were mailed to those who requested them and Language Assistance Guides were available in 59 languages. • � A well-publicized toll-free phone number was available to answer questions about the forms, and responses could be taken over the phone. • � Under the LUCA program, local officials had the opportunity to address specific concerns about the accuracy and completeness of the address list. • � A Coverage Followup (CFU) telephone interview operation was implemented with the express purpose of improving within household coverage. Cases were telephoned when there was a discrepancy between the number in the count of persons box and the number of persons with data. A householdlevel undercoverage question was added to the questionnaire, and person-level overcoverage questions were also added. Certain categories of households checking these boxes were also selected for CFU for roster clarification. In addition, large households, or those with more than six household members, were selected for inclusion in CFU for the purpose of collecting full demographic data for persons beyond the first six. Resolving Multiple Responses With multiple ways for people to initiate or complete their enumeration, as well as the field follow-up operations, it was very likely that some households would be enumerated more than once. A special computer process was implemented to control the extent of this type of nonsampling error by resolving situations where more than one form was received from an address. The process consisted of several steps. Addresses that had more than one viable return were analyzed. Household data from one form were chosen as the household data to use in subsequent census processing. There are situations in which persons can then be added to the household roster if they are not already represented there. These are the cases in which a Be Counted form for a partial household was submitted for the same address, and when an enumeration operation discovers a person who should be counted at a different address (a Usual Home Elsewhere) from the address being enumerated.

DATA EDITING
The objective of the processing operation was to produce a set of data that describes the population as accurately and clearly as possible. As with Census 2000, information on 2010 Census questionnaires generally was not edited for consistency, completeness, and acceptability during field data collection nor during data capture operations. Enumerator-filled questionnaires were reviewed by census crew leaders and local office clerks for adherence to specified procedures. No clerical review of mail return questionnaires was done to ensure that the information on the form could be data captured, nor were households contacted to collect data that were missing from census returns as in previous censuses.

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Most census questionnaires received by mail from respondents as well as those filled by enumerators were processed through a new contractor-built image scanning system that used optical mark and character recognition to convert the responses into computer files. The optical character recognition, or OCR, process used several pattern and context checks to estimate accuracy thresholds for each write-in field. The system also used edits on interpreted write-in responses to decide whether the field values read by the machine interpretation were acceptable. If the value read had a lower than acceptable accuracy threshold or was outside of the edit range, the image of the item was displayed to a keyer, who then entered the response. To control the creation of possibly erroneous persons from questionnaires completed incorrectly or containing stray marks, an edit on the number of persons indicated on each mail return and enumeratorfilled questionnaire was implemented as part of the data capture system. In addition, a new edit identified questionnaires with information written outside of the response boxes. Detection of either of these conditions by the edits subsystem resulted in the review of the questionnaire image at a workstation by an operator who ensured that the person data were captured fully and correctly. At Census Bureau headquarters, the data records were subjected to a computer edit that identified households exhibiting a possible coverage problem and those with more than six household members. Attempts were made to contact these households on the telephone to correct the count inconsistency and to collect the census data for those people for whom there was no room on the questionnaire. Count Imputation Once census processing is completed, each address included in the census data collection has to be classified as a nonexistent unit, a vacant unit, or an occupied housing unit. Records that are classified as an occupied unit also need a reported number of residents. This information is necessary to have a complete count of the population and housing units in the United States as of Census Day. Because of the complexity of census operations, there are records that do not have such information by the end of the follow-up activities and data processing. To fill in this missing information, the Census Bureau conducted count imputation, which assigns a unit status and household size to records without such information. This process also included assigning household size to occupied units without household size information. Count imputation processing did not include group quarters. In count imputation, all the records in the enumeration universe were partitioned within a designated geographical area into small groups based on certain characteristics. For each small group, a probability distribution of unit status and size from the records that had this information was created. Then, the distribution was used to impute for the missing data status and/or household size. General Imputation Rules The final automated edit and imputation processes determined the final values of questionnaire data items for records with missing or invalid values in collected data. Imputations, which were needed most often when an entry for a given item was missing, included three general procedures known as assignments, allocations, and substitution. Assignments and allocations were imputations of characteristic items on an item-by-item basis, whereas the substitution process imputed data for up to six persons in a household at one time. Each of these procedures ensured the completeness and consistency of the data by providing acceptable codes for missing or unacceptable entries. The first step in the edit process was to assign acceptable codes in place of unacceptable entries or blanks when acceptable data were found for that same person. When one characteristic item reported for a person was inconsistent with other information provided for that same person, acceptable codes or values that were consistent with one item of reported information were assigned. The edit procedures also assigned race or Hispanic origin from a matched person record in Census 2000 or in the American Community Survey (2000–2009) when these fields were missing. These assignment steps strove to ensure consistency across characteristic data.

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The next step in the edit process, known as allocation, was to impute responses for missing person or housing-unit characteristic data. The general procedure for changing unacceptable entries through allocation was to derive an entry for a person (or housing unit) that was consistent with entries for another person (or housing unit) with similar characteristics. Allocation rates for census items were made available with the published census data. Another way corrections are made during the edit and imputation process was through substitution; that is, the replication of a full set of characteristics for people in a household. When there was an indication that a household was occupied by a specified number of people but the questionnaire record contained no information for the people within the household or the occupants were not listed on the questionnaire, a previously accepted household of the same size was selected as a substitute. The full set of characteristics of the substitute was duplicated. Counts of substituted persons and the occupied housing units containing substituted persons were made available with the published census data.

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Chapter 6.
� Subject Definitions

Age—For the purpose of census data collection and tabulation, age is the length of time a person has lived in completed years as of April 1, 2010, the census reference date (or Census Day). Therefore, census tabulations of the population by age group represent the age composition as of April 1, 2010. Average Family Size—A measure obtained by dividing the total number of people in families by the total number of families (or family householders). This measure is rounded to the nearest hundredth. Average Household Size—A measure obtained by dividing the total number of people in households by the total number of households (or householders). This measure is rounded to the nearest hundredth. Average Household Size of Owner-Occupied Units—A measure obtained by dividing the total number of people living in owner-occupied housing units by the total number of owner-occupied housing units. This measure is rounded to the nearest hundredth. Average Household Size of Renter-Occupied Units—A measure obtained by dividing the total number of people living in renter-occupied housing units by the total number of renter-occupied housing units. This measure is rounded to the nearest hundredth. Child—A child includes a son or daughter by birth (biological child), a stepchild, or an adopted child of the householder, regardless of the child’s age or marital status. The category excludes sons-in-law, daughtersin-law, and foster children. Family Household (Family)—A family includes a householder and one or more people living in the same household who are related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. All people in a household who are related to the householder are regarded as members of his or her family. A family household may contain people not related to the householder, but those people are not included as part of the householder’s family in census tabulations. Thus, the number of family households is equal to the number of families, but family households may include more members than do families. A household can contain only one family for purposes of census tabulations. Not all households contain families since a household may be comprised of a group of unrelated people or one person living alone—these are called nonfamily households. Same-sex unmarried partner households are included in the family households category only if there is at least one additional person related to the householder by birth or adoption. Female Householder, No Husband Present—A female maintaining a household with no husband of the householder present. Group Quarters—A group quarters is a place where people live or stay, in a group living arrangement, that is owned or managed by an entity or organization providing housing and/or services for the residents. This is not a typical household-type living arrangement. These services may include custodial or medical care as well as other types of assistance, and residency is commonly restricted to those receiving these services. People living in group quarters are usually not related to each other. Group quarters include such places as college residence halls, residential treatment centers, skilled-nursing facilities, group homes, military barracks, correctional facilities, and workers’ dormitories. Hispanic or Latino origin—People who identify with the terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” are those who classify themselves in one of the specific Hispanic or Latino categories listed on the questionnaire— “Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano,” “Puerto Rican,” or “Cuban”—as well as those who indicate that they are “another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin.” Origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, Subject Definitions
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lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s ancestors before their arrival in the United States. People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. Homeowner Vacancy Rate—The homeowner vacancy rate is the proportion of the homeowner inventory that is vacant “for sale.” It is computed by dividing the total number of vacant units “for sale only” by the sum of owner-occupied units, vacant units that are “for sale only,” and vacant units that have been sold but not yet occupied, and then multiplying by 100. This measure is rounded to the nearest tenth. Household—A household includes all of the people who occupy a housing unit. People not living in households are classified as living in group quarters. Householder—In most cases, the householder is the person, or one of the people, in whose name the home is owned, being bought, or rented and who is listed as Person 1 on the census questionnaire. If there is no such person in the household, any adult household member 15 years old and over could be designated as the householder (i.e., Person 1). Housing Unit—A housing unit may be a house, apartment, mobile home, group of rooms, or single room that is occupied (or if vacant, is intended for occupancy) as separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live separately from any other individuals in the building and which have direct access from outside the building or through a common hall. Husband-Wife Family—A family in which the householder and his or her spouse of the opposite sex are enumerated as members of the same household. (Note: Family households and husband-wifecouple families do not include same-sex married couples even if the marriage was performed in a state issuing marriage certificates for same-sex couples. Same-sex-couple households are included in the family households category if there is at least one additional person related to the householder by birth or adoption. Same-sex-couple households with no relatives of the householder present are tabulated in nonfamily households.) Institutional Group Quarters—Facilities that house those who are primarily ineligible, unable, or unlikely to participate in the labor force while residents. Male Householder, No Wife Present—A male maintaining a household with no wife of the householder present. Median Age—The median divides the age distribution into two equal parts, one-half of the cases falling below the median age and one-half above the median. This measure is rounded to the nearest tenth. Nonfamily Household—A householder living alone or with nonrelatives only. (Note: Family households and husband-wife-couple families do not include same-sex married couples even if the marriage was performed in a state issuing marriage certificates for same-sex couples. Same-sex-couple households are included in the family households category if there is at least one additional person related to the householder by birth or adoption. Same-sex-couple households with no relatives of the householder present are tabulated in nonfamily households.) Noninstitutional Group Quarters—Facilities that house those who are primarily eligible, able, or likely to participate in the labor force while residents. Nonrelative—Any household member, including foster children, who is not related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. Occupied Housing Unit—A housing unit is classified as occupied if it is the usual place of residence of the person or group of people living in it at the time of enumeration, or if the occupants are only temporarily absent; that is, away on vacation or business. Other Relative—Any household member related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption but not included specifically in another relationship category listed on the questionnaire.

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Subject Definitions
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Own Child—A child under 18 years old who is a son or daughter by birth, stepchild, or adopted child of the householder. Owner-Occupied Housing Unit—A housing unit is owner-occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the unit even if it is mortgaged or not paid in full. Race—The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race that was asked of all people. The Census Bureau collects racial data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically. In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race item include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. People may choose to report more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, such as “American Indian” and “White.” People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau adhere to the October 30, 1997, Federal Register notice entitled, “Revisions to the Standards for the Classification of Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity,” issued by OMB. These standards govern the categories used to collect and present federal data on race and ethnicity. OMB requires five minimum categories (White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander) for race. The racial categories are described below with a sixth category, “Some Other Race,” added with OMB approval. In addition to the five race groups, OMB also states that respondents should be offered the option of selecting one or more races. Definitions from OMB guide the Census Bureau in classifying written responses to the race question: White—A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as “White” or report entries such as Irish, German, Italian, Lebanese, Arab, Moroccan, or Caucasian.
� Black or African American—A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as “Black, African Am., or Negro” or report entries such as African American, Kenyan, Nigerian, or Haitian. American Indian or Alaska Native—A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. This category includes people who indicate their race as “American Indian or Alaska Native” or report entries such as Navajo, Blackfeet, Inupiat, Yup’ik, Central American Indian groups, or South American Indian groups. Asian—A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. It includes people who indicate their race as “Asian Indian,” “Chinese,” “Filipino,” “Korean,” “Japanese,” “Vietnamese,” and “Other Asian,” or report entries such as those detailed below. Asian Indian—Includes people who indicate their race as “Asian Indian” or report entries such as India or East Indian. Chinese—Includes people who indicate their race as “Chinese” or report entries such as China or Chinese American. In some census tabulations, written entries of Taiwanese are included with Chinese while in others they are shown separately. Filipino—Includes people who indicate their race as “Filipino” or report entries such as Philippines or Filipino American.

Subject Definitions
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

6-3

Japanese—Includes people who indicate their race as “Japanese” or report entries such as Japan or Japanese American. Korean—Includes people who indicate their race as “Korean” or report entries such as Korea or Korean American. Vietnamese—Includes people who indicate their race as “Vietnamese” or report entries such as Vietnam or Vietnamese American. Other Asian—Includes people who provide a write-in response of another Asian group, such as Bangladeshi, Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, Malaysian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, or Thai.
� Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander—A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. It includes people who indicate their race as “Native Hawaiian,” “Guamanian or Chamorro,” “Samoan,” and “Other Pacific Islander” or report entries such as those detailed below. Native Hawaiian—Includes people who indicate their race as “Native Hawaiian” or report entries such as Part Hawaiian or Hawaiian. Guamanian or Chamorro—Includes people who indicate their race as ”Guamanian or Chamorro” or report entries such as Chamorro or Guam. Samoan—Includes people who indicate their race as “Samoan” or report entries such as American Samoan or Western Samoan. Other Pacific Islander—Includes people who provide a response of another Pacific Islander group, such as Carolinian, Chuukese (Trukese), Fijian, Kosraean, Northern Mariana Islander, Palauan, Papua New Guinean, Pohnpeian, Solomon Islander, Tahitian, Tokelauan, Tongan, or Yapese. Some Other Race—Includes all other responses not included in the “White,” “Black or African American,” “American Indian or Alaska Native,” “Asian,” and “Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander” racial categories described above. Respondents reporting entries such as multiracial, mixed, interracial, or a Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish group (for example, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or Spanish) in response to the race question are included in this category. Alone or in Combination—In other presentations on race, data are shown for the total number of people who reported 1 of the 6 categories alone or in combination with one or more other racial categories. For example, the category “Asian alone or in combination with one or more other races” includes people who reported Asian alone and those who reported Asian in combination with one or more of the other racial groups (i.e., White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and Some Other Race). This number, therefore, represents the maximum number of people who reported being Asian in the question on race. When this data presentation is used, the individual racial categories will add to more than the total population because people may be included in more than one category. Two or More Races—People may choose to provide two or more races either by checking two or more race response check boxes, providing multiple responses, or some combination of check boxes and other responses. The racial response categories shown on the questionnaire are collapsed into the five minimum racial groups identified by OMB and the Census Bureau’s “Some Other Race” category. For data product purposes, “Two or More Races” refers to combinations of two or more of the following racial categories: 1. White 2. Black or African American 3. American Indian or Alaska Native 6-4 Subject Definitions
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

4. Asian 5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 6. Some Other Race Rental Vacancy Rate—The rental vacancy rate is the proportion of the rental inventory that is vacant “for rent.” It is computed by dividing the total number of vacant units “for rent” by the sum of the renteroccupied units, vacant units that are “for rent,” and vacant units that have been rented but not yet occupied, and then multiplying by 100. This measure is rounded to the nearest tenth. Renter-Occupied Housing Unit—All occupied housing units that are not owner-occupied, whether they are rented or occupied without payment of rent, are classified as renter-occupied. Housing units in “continuing care” or life care facilities are included in the “rented” category. Sex—For the purpose of census data collection and tabulation, sex refers to a person’s biological sex. Spouse—The “spouse” category includes a person identified as the husband or wife of the householder and who is of the opposite sex. It does not include same-sex spouses even if a marriage was performed in a state issuing marriage certificates for same-sex couples. Tenure—All occupied housing units are classified as either owner-occupied or renter-occupied. A housing unit is owner-occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the unit even if it is mortgaged or not fully paid for. All occupied housing units that are not owner-occupied, whether they are rented or occupied without payment of rent, are classified as renter-occupied. Unmarried Partner—An unmarried partner is a person aged 15 years and over who is not related to the householder, who shares living quarters, and who has a close personal relationship with the householder. Responses of “same-sex spouse” are edited into this category. Vacant Housing Unit—A housing unit is vacant if no one is living in it at the time of enumeration, unless its occupants are only temporarily absent. Units temporarily occupied at the time of enumeration entirely by people who have a usual residence elsewhere are also classified as vacant. (For more information, see “Housing Unit.”) For Rent—These are vacant units offered “for rent,” and vacant units offered either “for rent or
� for sale.” Rented, Not Occupied—These are vacant units rented but not yet occupied, including units where money has been paid or agreed upon but the renter has not yet moved in. For Sale Only—These are vacant units being offered “for sale only,” including units in cooperatives and condominium projects, if the individual units are offered “for sale only.” If units are offered either “for rent or for sale,” they are included in the “for rent” classification. Sold, Not Occupied—These are vacant units sold but not yet occupied, including units that have been sold recently but the new owner has not yet moved in. For Seasonal, Recreational, or Occasional Use—These are vacant units used or intended for use only in certain seasons or for weekends or other occasional use throughout the year. Seasonal units include those used for summer or winter sports or recreation, such as beach cottages and hunting cabins. Seasonal units also may include quarters for such workers as herders and loggers. Interval ownership units, sometimes called shared-ownership or time-sharing condominiums, also are included here. Other Vacant—If a vacant unit does not fall into any of the categories specified above, it is classified as “Other vacant.” For example, this category includes units held for occupancy by a caretaker or janitor, for migrant workers, and for personal reasons of the owner.

Subject Definitions
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

6-5

DERIVED MEASURES
Average. See “Mean.” Interpolation. Interpolation frequently is used in calculating medians or quartiles based on interval data. Linear interpolation is used to estimate values of a function between two known values. This is the form of interpolation used to calculate median age. Mean. This measure represents an arithmetic average of a set of values. It is derived by dividing the sum (or aggregate) of a group of numerical items by the total number of items in that group. For example, average family size is obtained by dividing the total number of people in families by the total number of families. (Additional information on means is included in the separate explanations of many population and housing subjects.) Median. This measure represents the middle value (if n is odd) or the average of the two middle values (if n is even) in an ordered list of n data values. The median divides the total frequency distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median and one-half above the median. (See also “Interpolation.”) Percentage. This measure is calculated by taking the total number of items in a group possessing a characteristic of interest and dividing by the total number of items in that group and then multiplying by 100. Rate. This is a measure of occurrences in a given period of time divided by the possible number of occurrences during that period. Rates are sometimes presented as percentages.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
The Demographic Profile data are available through American FactFinder, which can be accessed from the Census Bureau’s Internet site at . The Demographic Profile Summary File data are available in .CSV format for File Transfer Protocol (FTP) download only.

6-6

Subject Definitions
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Chapter 7. User Updates
.

User updates supply data users with additional or corrected information that becomes available after the technical documentation or files are prepared. They are issued in a numbered series and are available in portable document format (PDF) on our Web site at . Please file the user updates cover sheet behind this notice. If there are technical documentation replacement pages, they should be filed in their proper location and the original pages should be destroyed.

User Updates
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

7-1

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Data Note 1
.

Geocoding errors can occur when a living quarter such as a house, apartment, or military vessel, is placed in an incorrect location. We discovered a systematic error in the manner in which a few military vessels were geocoded, including an error involving Coronado city and San Diego city, California. As a result, the Census Bureau provided in March 2011 revised population counts for two 2010 Census tabulation blocks. The corrected and original population counts are: Population in corrected block 1029, census tract 113, San Diego city, CA 0 Population in corrected block 1000, census tract 113, Coronado city, CA 5,785 Population in original block 1029, census tract 113, San Diego city, CA 5,785 Population in original block 1000, census tract 113, Coronado city, CA 0

For additional information, see . This note is applicable to 2010 Census data products containing data at the place, census tract, or block levels, including: • • • • • • • Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File Advance Group Quarters Summary File Demographic Profile Summary File 1 Summary File 2 Congressional District Summary File (113th Congress) and subsequent releases State Legislative District Summary File and subsequent releases

June 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Data Note 2
.

Geocoding errors can occur when a living quarter such as a house, apartment, or military vessel, is placed in an incorrect location. We discovered a systematic error in the manner in which a few military vessels were geocoded, including an error involving Groton city and Conning Towers Nautilus Park census designated place (CDP), both of which are located in Groton town, New London County, Connecticut. As a result, the Census Bureau provided in March 2011 revised population counts for two 2010 Census tabulation blocks. The corrected and original population counts are: Population in corrected block 1020, census tract 9800, Conning Towers Nautilus Park CDP CT , 994 Population in original block 1020, census tract 9800, Conning Towers Nautilus Park CDP, CT 0

Population in corrected block 1001, census tract 7026, Groton city, CT 32

Population in original block 1001, census tract 7026, Groton city, CT 1,026

For additional information, see . This note is applicable to 2010 Census data products containing data at the place, census tract, or block levels, including: • • • • • • • Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File Advance Group Quarters Summary File Demographic Profile Summary File 1 Summary File 2 Congressional District Summary File (113th Congress) and subsequent releases State Legislative District Summary File and subsequent releases

June 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Data Note 3
.

Geocoding errors can occur when a living quarter such as a house, apartment, or military vessel, is placed in an incorrect location. We discovered a systematic error in the manner in which a few military vessels were geocoded, including an error involving Pascagoula city, Mississippi. As a result, the Census Bureau provided in March 2011 revised population counts for two 2010 Census tabulation blocks. The corrected and original population counts are: Population in corrected block 1305, census tract 429, Pascagoula city, MS 0 Population in corrected block 1278, census tract 429, Pascagoula city, MS 32 Population in original block 1305, census tract 429, Pascagoula city, MS 32 Population in original block 1278, census tract 429, Pascagoula city, MS 0

For additional information, see . This note is applicable to 2010 Census data products containing data at the census tract or block levels, including: • • • • • • • Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File Advance Group Quarters Summary File Demographic Profile Summary File 1 Summary File 2 Congressional District Summary File (113th Congress) and subsequent releases State Legislative District Summary File and subsequent releases

June 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Data Note 4
.

Geocoding errors can occur when a living quarter such as a house, apartment, or military vessel, is placed in an incorrect location. We discovered a systematic error in the manner in which a few military vessels were geocoded, including an error involving Portsmouth city and Hampton town, in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. As a result, the Census Bureau provided in March 2011 revised population counts for two 2010 Census tabulation blocks. The corrected and original population counts are: Population in corrected block 1013, census tract 650.07, Hampton town, NH 22 Population in corrected block 1001, census tract 691, Portsmouth city, NH 514 Population in original block 1013, census tract 650.07, Hampton town, NH 476 Population in original block 1001, census tract 691, Portsmouth city, NH 60

For additional information, see . This note is applicable to 2010 Census data products containing data at the place, minor civil division, census tract, or block levels, including: • • • • • • • Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File Advance Group Quarters Summary File Demographic Profile Summary File 1 Summary File 2 Congressional District Summary File (113th Congress) and subsequent releases State Legislative District Summary File and subsequent releases

June 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Data Note 5
.

Geocoding errors can occur when a living quarter such as a house, apartment, or military vessel, is placed in an incorrect location. We discovered a systematic error in the manner in which a few military vessels were geocoded, including an error involving Everett city, Washington. As a result, the Census Bureau provided in March 2011 revised population counts for two 2010 Census tabulation blocks. The corrected and original population counts are: Population in corrected block 4014, census tract 401, Everett city, WA 0 Population in corrected block 3026, census tract 404, Everett city, WA 683 Population in original block 4014, census tract 401, Everett city, WA 683 Population in original block 3026, census tract 404, Everett city, WA 0

For additional information, see . This note is applicable to 2010 Census data products containing data at the census tract or block levels, including: • • • • • • • Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File Advance Group Quarters Summary File Demographic Profile Summary File 1 Summary File 2 Congressional District Summary File (113th Congress) and subsequent releases State Legislative District Summary File and subsequent releases

June 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Data Note 6
.

Geocoding errors can occur when a living quarter such as a house, apartment, or military vessel, is placed in an incorrect location. As a result of a geocoding error, the Census Bureau provided in March 2011 revised population counts for two 2010 Census tabulation blocks in Norfolk, Virginia. The geocoding error placed ships ported at the Norfolk Naval Station incorrectly in block 1000, census tract 38, Norfolk city. These ships correctly belong in block 1044, census tract 9.02, Norfolk city. The corrected and original population counts are: Population in corrected block 1000, census tract 38 73 Population in corrected block 1044, census tract 9.02 19,279 Population in original block 1000, census tract 38 19,352 Population in original block 1044, census tract 9.02 0

For additional information, see . This note is applicable to 2010 Census data products containing data at the census tract or block levels, including: • • • • • • Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File Advance Group Quarters Summary File Summary File 1 Summary File 2 Congressional District Summary File (113th Congress) and subsequent releases State Legislative District Summary File and subsequent releases

June 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Technical Documentation Note 1
.

Chapter 2. How to Use This Product The Geographic Header Record was replaced in Chapter 2, “How to Use This Product,” because the state portion was inadvertently omitted.

May 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File Technical Documentation Note 2
.

The Demographic Profile Summary File has been re-released with more geography following the release of the Summary File 1 product. Consequently, the Summary Level Sequence Chart and Geographic Header Record have been updated.

August 2011

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census

Appendix A.
� Geographic Terms and Concepts

Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANRC) (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native Village (ANV) (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . Alaska Native Village Statistical Area (ANVSA) (see American Indian, Alaska Native,
� and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Off-Reservation Trust Land (see American Indian, Alaska Native,
� and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Reservation (see American Indian, Alaska Native,
� and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian Tribal Subdivision (see American Indian, Alaska Native,
� and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Codes (see Codes for Geographic Entities) . . . . . . . . . American Samoa (see Island Areas of the United States) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Area Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barrio (see Puerto Rico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barrio-Pueblo (see Puerto Rico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Borough (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity; see County Subdivision; see Place) . . . . . . . Boundary Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Area (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Block (see Block) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Bureau Codes (see Codes for Geographic Entities). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census County Division (CCD) (see County Subdivision) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Designated Place (CDP) (see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Division (see also Census Region) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Region (see also Census Division) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Subarea (see County Subdivision) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Census Tract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Central Place (see Urban and Rural) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . City (see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . City and Borough (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity; see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Codes for Geographic Entities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined New England City and Town Area (see Core Based Statistical Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined Statistical Area (CSA) (see Core Based Statistical Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (see Island Areas of the United States) . . . . . . . . . Comparability (see Boundary Changes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comunidad (see Puerto Rico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Congressional District (CD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consolidated City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Core Based Statistical Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County or Statistically Equivalent Entity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Subdivision. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

A-5
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Density (see Population and Housing Unit Density) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Division (see Census Division) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extended Place (see Urban and Rural) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Class Codes (see Geographic Area Attributes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIPS Codes (see Codes for Geographic Entities) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Functional Status (see Geographic Area Attributes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Area Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Hierarchy (see Introduction—Geographic Presentation of Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Names Information System Identifier (GNIS ID) (see Codes for
� Geographic Entities) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geographic Presentation (see Introduction—Geographic Presentation of Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guam (see Island Areas of the United States) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaiian Home Land (HHL) (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . Hierarchical Presentation (see Introduction—Geographic Presentation of Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Incorporated Place (see Place; see County Subdivision) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Independent City (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity; see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Independent Place (see County Subdivision; see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Point (see Geographic Area Attributes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction—Geographic Presentation of Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inventory Presentation (see Introduction—Geographic Presentation of Data) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Island (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Island Areas of the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joint-Use Areas (see American Indian Area, Alaska Native Area, and Hawaiian Home Land) . . . . . . . Land Area (see Area Measurement) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal/Statistical Area Description (see Geographic Area Attributes). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAF/TIGER (Master Address File/Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing) Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Division (see Core Based Statistical Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan Statistical Area (see Core Based Statistical Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Micropolitan Statistical Area (see Core Based Statistical Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minor Civil Division (MCD) (see County Subdivision) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Municipality (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity; see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Municipio (see Puerto Rico; see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Names of Geographic Entities (see Geographic Area Attributes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Standard Feature Identifier (see Codes for Geographic Entities; see Geographic
� Names Information System [GNIS ID]) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area (NECTA) (see Core Based Statistical Area). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England City and Town Area Division (see Core Based Statistical Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northern Mariana Islands (see Island Areas of the United States). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off-Reservation Trust Land (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Area (OTSA) (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Area (OTSA) Joint-Use Area (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outlying Areas (see Island Areas of the United States). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parish (see County or Statistically Equivalent Entity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2

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Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Place. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Place Within Consolidated City (see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population and Housing Unit Density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Principal City (see Core Based Statistical Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Use Microdata Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Puerto Rico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Region (see Census Region) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rural (see Urban and Rural) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School District (Elementary, Secondary, and Unified) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State or Statistically Equivalent Entity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Designated American Indian Statistical Area (SDAISA) (see American Indian,
� Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Designated Tribal Statistical Area (SDTSA) (see American Indian, Alaska Native,
� and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State Legislative District (Upper and Lower Chambers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subbarrio (see Puerto Rico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subminor Civil Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Town (see County Subdivision; see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Township (see County Subdivision) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tract (see Census Tract) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Block Group (see Block Group). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Census Tract (see Census Tract). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tribal Designated Statistical Area (TDSA) (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trust Land (see American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U.S. Minor Outlying Islands (see Island Areas of the United States) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U.S. States Virgin Islands (see Island Areas of the United States) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unorganized Territory (see County Subdivision) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban (see Urban and Rural) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban and Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Cluster (UC) (see Urban and Rural) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban Growth Area (UGA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urbanized Area (UA) (see Urban and Rural) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Village (see Place) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voting District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water Area (see Area Measurement) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZIP Code (see ZIP Code Tabulation Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zona Urbana (see Puerto Rico) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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INTRODUCTION
This document provides definitions of geographic terms and concepts as well as a description of the different methods used to present information for geographic entities in U.S. Census Bureau data products. This document contains definitions for all geographic area terms and concepts recognized by the Census Bureau and that may appear in any Census Bureau product presenting demographic and housing data (geographic terms and concepts unique to the economic census and other specialized surveys and censuses are not included in this document). The inclusion of a particular term or concept in this Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

A-3

document does not imply that data for that geographic entity or attribute appear in each data product. For instance, data for tribal census tracts and tribal block groups will appear only in products providing data according to the American Indian Nation-based geographic hierarchy (see Figure A-2). As another example, because urban areas are defined on the basis of decennial census population counts, data for urban areas do not appear in initial decennial census data products. In addition, the description of both the hierarchical and inventory approaches to presenting data for geographic entities does not imply that both formats are used in each data product.

GEOGRAPHIC PRESENTATION OF DATA
In Census Bureau data products, geographic entities usually are presented in a hierarchical arrangement or as an inventory listing. Hierarchical Presentation A hierarchical geographic presentation shows the geographic entities in a superior/subordinate structure. This structure is derived from the legal, administrative, or areal relationships of the entities. The hierarchical structure is depicted in report tables by means of indentation. For computer-readable media, the hierarchy is shown in the descriptive name applied to a summary level, with the hierarchy in order separated by hyphens. An example of hierarchical presentation is the census geographic hierarchy consisting of census block, within block group, within census tract, within place, within county subdivision, within county, within state. Graphically, this is shown as: State County County subdivision Place (or part) Census tract (or part) Block group (or part) Block Figure A-1, which is a diagram of the geographic hierarchy, presents this information as a series of nesting relationships. For example, a line joining the lower-level entity place and the higher-level entity state means that a place cannot cross a state boundary; a line linking census tract and county means that a census tract cannot cross a county line; and so forth. There is no implied hierarchy between different line tracks; for example, census tract nests within county, but it may cross a county subdivision boundary even though county subdivision also nests within county. Inventory Presentation An inventory presentation of geographic entities is one in which all entities of the same type are shown in alphabetical, code, or geographic sequence, without reference to their hierarchical relationships. Generally, an inventory presentation shows totals for entities that may be split in a hierarchical presentation, such as place, census tract, or block group. An example of a series of inventory presentations is state, followed by all the counties in that state, followed by all the places in that state. Graphically, this is shown as: State County A County B County C Place X Place Y Place Z

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Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Nation-Based Hierarchies Exceptions to the standard hierarchical presentation occur for entities that do not necessarily nest within states, most notably American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas and core based statistical areas. American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area (AIANNHA) Hierarchy Because federally recognized American Indian areas can cross state lines, a separate American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian area (AIANNHA) hierarchy exists for these areas. For instance, the following American Indian entities can cross state lines: federally recognized American Indian reservations and/or off-reservation trust lands, tribal subdivisions, tribal designated statistical areas, tribal census tracts, and tribal block groups. National summary data for American Indian reservations or statistical areas may be presented as an alphabetical listing of names followed by the state portions of each area. Also, a tribal census tract or tribal block group may be located in more than one state or county. Data for tribal census tracts and tribal block groups are presented only in Census Bureau products utilizing the AIANNHA hierarchy and are not present in products utilizing the standard census geographic hierarchy. The diagram in Figure A-2 shows geographic relationships among geographic entities in the AIANNHA hierarchy. It does not show the geographic levels county, county subdivision, and place, among others, because AIANNHAs do not necessarily nest within them.

DEFINITIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC ENTITIES, TERMS, AND CONCEPTS
The definitions below are for geographic entities and concepts that the Census Bureau includes in its standard data products. Not all entities, terms, and concepts are shown in any one data product.

AMERICAN INDIAN, ALASKA NATIVE, AND NATIVE HAWAIIAN AREA
There are both legal and statistical American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas (AIANNHAs) for which the Census Bureau provides data. The legal entities consist of federally recognized American Indian reservations and off-reservation trust land areas, the tribal subdivisions that can divide these entities, state-recognized American Indian reservations, Alaska Native regional corporations, and Hawaiian home lands. The statistical entities are Alaska Native village statistical areas, Oklahoma tribal statistical areas, tribal designated statistical areas, and state designated tribal statistical areas. Statistical tribal subdivisions can exist within Oklahoma tribal statistical areas. In all cases, these areas are mutually exclusive in that no AIANNHA can overlap another tribal entity, except for tribal subdivisions, which by definition subdivide some American Indian entities, and Alaska Native village statistical areas, which exist within Alaska Native regional corporations. In cases where more than one tribe claims jurisdiction over an area, the Census Bureau creates a joint-use area as a separate entity to define this area of dual claims. The following provides more detail about each of the various AIANNHAs. Legal Entities Alaska Native regional corporations (ANRCs) were created pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) (Pub. L. 92–203, 85 Stat. 688 [1971]; 43 U.S.C. 1602 et seq. [2000]), enacted in 1971 as a ‘‘Regional Corporation’’ and organized under the laws of the state of Alaska to conduct both the for-profit and non-profit affairs of Alaska Natives within a defined region of Alaska. For the Census Bureau, ANRCs are considered legal geographic entities. Twelve ANRCs cover the entire state of Alaska except for the area within the Annette Island Reserve (a federally recognized American Indian reservation under the governmental authority of the Metlakatla Indian Community). A thirteenth ANRC represents Alaska Natives who do not live in Alaska and do not identify with any of the twelve corporations. The Census Bureau does not provide data for this thirteenth ANRC because it has no defined geographic extent and thus, it does not appear in the TIGER/Line® shapefiles. The Census Bureau offers representatives of the 12 nonprofit ANRCs in Alaska the opportunity to review and update the ANRC boundaries before each decennial census.

Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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Each ANRC is assigned a five-digit numeric Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code and an eightdigit National Standard (ANSI) code. American Indian reservations—Federal (federal AIRs) are areas that have been set aside by the United States for the use of tribes, the exterior boundaries of which are more particularly defined in the final tribal treaties, agreements, executive orders, federal statutes, secretarial orders, or judicial determinations. The Bureau of Indian Affairs maintains a list of all federally recognized tribal governments and makes final determination of the inventory of federal AIRs. The Census Bureau recognizes federal reservations (and associated off-reservation trust lands) as territory over which American Indian tribes have primary governmental authority. American Indian reservations can be legally described as colonies, communities, Indian colonies, Indian communities, Indian rancherias, Indian reservations, Indian villages, pueblos, rancherias, ranches, reservations, reserves, settlements, or villages. The Census Bureau contacts representatives of American Indian tribal governments to identify the boundaries for federal reservations through its annual Boundary and Annexation Survey. Federal reservations may cross state and all other area boundaries. Each federal AIR is assigned a four-digit census code ranging from 0001 through 4799 in alphabetical order of AIR names nationwide. This nation-based census code is the primary unique identifier for the AIR. Each federal AIR also is assigned a five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. Because FIPS codes are assigned in alphabetical sequence within each state, the FIPS code will be different in each state for reservations that include territory in more than one state. American Indian reservations—State (state AIRs) are reservations established by some state governments for tribes recognized by the state. A governor-appointed state liaison provides the names and boundaries for state-recognized American Indian reservations to the Census Bureau. State reservations must be defined within a single state but may cross county and other types of boundaries. Each state AIR is assigned a four-digit census code ranging from 9000 through 9499. Each state AIR also is assigned a fivedigit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. To further identify and differentiate state-recognized American Indian areas from those that are federally recognized, the text “(state)” is appended to the AIR name. American Indian tribal subdivisions, described as additions, administrative areas, areas, chapters, county districts, communities, districts, or segments, are legal administrative subdivisions of federally recognized American Indian reservations and off-reservation trust lands or are statistical subdivisions of Oklahoma tribal statistical areas (OTSAs). These entities are internal units of self-government or administration that serve social, cultural, and/or economic purposes for the American Indians on the reservations, offreservation trust lands, or OTSAs. The Census Bureau obtains the boundary and name information for tribal subdivisions from tribal governments. Each American Indian tribal subdivision is assigned a threedigit census code that is alphabetically in order and unique within each American Indian area, a five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code assigned alphabetically within state, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. Because FIPS codes are assigned in alphabetical sequence within each state, the FIPS code will be different in each state for tribal subdivisions that include territory in more than one state. All the summary levels that include tribal subdivisions in the presentation hierarchy will only have records for the 24 American Indian areas and two OTSAs that actually have tribal subdivisions. The list of areas and four-digit census codes is:

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Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Code 0335 0605 0855 0990 1110 1150 1160 1250 1310 1505 1830 1860 2175 2430 2490 2810 3100 3235 3340 3680 3935 3970 4200 4290 5550 5590

American Indian area Bois Forte Reservation, MN Cheyenne River Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, SD Crow Creek Reservation, SD Eastern Cherokee Reservation, NC Flathead Reservation, MT Fort Belknap Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, MT Fort Berthold Reservation, ND Fort Peck Indian Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, MT Gila River Indian Reservation, AZ Hopi Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, AZ Lac Vieux Desert Reservation, MI Lake Traverse Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, ND-SD Menominee Reservation, WI Navajo Nation Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, AZ-NM-UT Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, MT Pine Ridge Reservation, SD-NE Red Lake Reservation, MN Rosebud Indian Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, SD Salt River Reservation, AZ Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, MN Spirit Lake Reservation, ND Standing Rock Reservation, SD-ND Tohono O’odham Nation Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, AZ Tulalip Reservation and Off-Reservation Trust Land, WA Cherokee OTSA, OK Choctaw OTSA, OK

Hawaiian home lands (HHLs) are areas held in trust for Native Hawaiians by the state of Hawaii, pursuant to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920, as amended. The Census Bureau obtains the names and boundaries for HHLs from state officials. The names of the home lands are based on the traditional ahupua‘a names of the Crown and government lands of the Kingdom of Hawaii from which the lands were designated or from the local name for an area. Being lands held in trust, HHLs are treated as equivalent to off-reservation trust land areas with the American Indian Trust Land/Hawaiian Home Land Indicator coded as “T.” Each HHL is assigned a national four-digit census code ranging from 5000 through 5499 based on the alphabetical sequence of each HHL name, a five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code in alphabetical order within the state of Hawaii, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. Joint-use areas, as applied to any American Indian area by the Census Bureau, means an area that is administered jointly and/or claimed by two or more American Indian tribes. The Census Bureau designates legal joint-use areas as unique geographic entities equivalent to a reservation for the purpose of presenting statistical data. Each is assigned a national four-digit census code ranging from 4800 through 4999 based on the alphabetical sequence of each joint-use area name, a five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code in alphabetical order within state, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. No joint-use areas exist in multiple states. Off-reservation trust lands are areas for which the United States holds title in trust for the benefit of a tribe (tribal trust land) or for an individual American Indian (individual trust land). Trust lands can be alienated or encumbered only by the owner with the approval of the Secretary of the Interior or his/her authorized representative. Trust lands may be located on or off a reservation; however, the Census Bureau tabulates data only for off-reservation trust lands with the off-reservation trust lands always associated with a specific federally recognized reservation and/or tribal government. As for federally recognized reservations, the Census Bureau obtains the boundaries of off-reservation trust lands from American Indian Geographic Terms and Concepts
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tribal governments through its annual Boundary and Annexation Survey. The Census Bureau recognizes and tabulates data for reservations and off-reservation trust lands because American Indian tribes have primary governmental authority over these lands. The Census Bureau does not identify fee land (or land in fee simple status) or restricted fee lands as specific geographic areas. Off-reservation trust lands are assigned a four-digit census code, a five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code that is the same as that for the reservation with which they are associated. Trust lands associated with tribes that do not have a reservation are assigned unique codes. The census code is assigned by tribal name within the range 0001 through 4799, interspersed alphabetically among the reservation names. Because FIPS codes are assigned in alphabetical sequence within each state, the FIPS code will be different in each state for off-reservation trust lands that include territory in more than one state. In decennial census data tabulations, the American Indian Trust Land/Hawaiian Home Land Indicator uniquely identifies off-reservation trust lands, as well as reservation or statistical area only portions, Hawaiian home lands, and records that consist of the combination of reservation and off-reservation trust land territory. Statistical Entities Alaska Native village statistical areas (ANVSAs) represent the more densely settled portion of Alaska Native villages (ANVs). The ANVs constitute associations, bands, clans, communities, groups, tribes, or villages recognized pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971 (Public Law 92-203). Because ANVs do not have boundaries that are easy to locate, the Census Bureau does not delimit ANVs. Instead, the Census Bureau presents statistical data for ANVSAs that represent the settled portion of ANVs. In addition, each ANVSA should include only an area where Alaska Natives, especially members of the defining ANV, represent a substantial proportion of the population during at least one season of the year. ANVSAs are delineated or reviewed by officials of the ANV or, if no ANV official chose to participate in the delineation process, officials of the Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANRC) in which the ANV is located. An ANVSA may not overlap the boundary of another ANVSA or an American Indian reservation. Each ANVSA is alphabetically assigned a national four-digit census code ranging from 6000 through 7999, an alphabetically assigned state-based five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. Oklahoma tribal statistical areas (OTSAs) are statistical entities identified and delineated by the Census Bureau in consultation with federally recognized American Indian tribes that had a former reservation in Oklahoma. The boundary of an OTSA will be that of the former reservation in Oklahoma, except where modified by agreements with neighboring tribes for statistical data presentation purposes. Each OTSA is alphabetically assigned a national four-digit census code ranging from 5500 through 5899, an alphabetically assigned state-based five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. Tribal subdivisions are allowed within OTSAs and exist for the 2010 Census in the Cherokee and Choctaw OTSAs. Oklahoma tribal statistical area (OTSA) Joint-Use Areas, as applied to OTSAs by the Census Bureau, means an area that is administered jointly and/or claimed by two or more American Indian tribes that have a delineated OTSA. The Census Bureau designates statistical joint-use areas as unique geographic entities for the purpose of presenting statistical data. Only Oklahoma tribal statistical areas have statistical jointuse areas. Each Oklahoma tribal joint-use area is alphabetically assigned a national four-digit census code ranging from 5900 through 5999, an alphabetically assigned state-based five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. State designated tribal statistical areas (SDTSAs—referred to as State Designated American Indian Statistical Areas for Census 2000) are statistical entities for state-recognized American Indian tribes that do not have a state-recognized land base (reservation). SDTSAs are identified and delineated for the Census Bureau by a state liaison identified by the governor’s office in each state. SDTSAs generally encompass a compact and contiguous area that contains a concentration of people who identify with a A-8 Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

state-recognized American Indian tribe and in which there is structured or organized tribal activity. An SDTSA may not be located in more than one state and it may not include area within any other American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian area. Each SDTSA is alphabetically assigned a four-digit census code ranging from 9500 through 9998, an alphabetically assigned state-based five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. Tribal designated statistical areas (TDSAs) are statistical entities identified and delineated for the Census Bureau by federally recognized American Indian tribes that do not currently have a federally recognized land base (reservation or off-reservation trust land). A TDSA generally encompasses a compact and contiguous area that contains a concentration of individuals who identify with a federally recognized American Indian tribe and in which there is structured or organized tribal activity. A TDSA may be located in more than one state (although none do for 2010), but it may not include area within any other American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian area. Each TDSA is alphabetically assigned a four-digit census code ranging from 8000 through 8999, an alphabetically assigned state-based five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code, and an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Area (AIANNHA) Codes—AIANNHAs are represented in Census Bureau products using a national four-character numeric census code field and a single alphabetic character American Indian trust land/Hawaiian home land indicator field. The census codes are assigned in alphabetical order in assigned ranges by AIANNHA type nationwide, except that joint-use areas appear at the end of the code range. Off-reservation trust lands are assigned the same code as the reservation with which they are associated. Trust lands associated with tribes that do not have a reservation are assigned codes based on tribal name. Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) codes for all AIANNHAs range from 00001 through 89999, without differentiation among the many types of areas. The type of AIANNHA can be identified either by the census code or by the FIPS class code. The range of census codes allocated to each AIANNHA and the valid FIPS class code(s) associated with each are as follows: AIANNHA type Federal American Indian reservation (AIR)/off-reservation trust land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joint-use federal AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaiian home land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma tribal statistical area (OTSA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joint-use OTSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska Native village statistical area (ANVSA) . . . . . . . . . . Tribal designated statistical area (TDSA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State designated tribal statistical area (SDTSA) . . . . . . . . . AIANNHA type Hawaiian home land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian reservation including associated off-reservation trust land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Indian reservation or statistical entity only . . . . . . . . . . Off-reservation trust land only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
* Refer to the Data Dictionary for specific value descriptions.

Census code range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0001 4800 5000 5500 5900 6000 8000 9000 9500 to to to to to to to to to 4799 4999 5499 5899 5999 7999 8999 9499 9998

Valid FIPS class code(s)* D1, D2, D3, D5, D8 D0 F1 D6 D0 E1 D6 D4 D9

American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian area indicator T M R T

AREA MEASUREMENT
Area measurement data provide the size, in square units (metric and nonmetric) of geographic entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates and disseminates data. Area is calculated from the specific boundary Geographic Terms and Concepts
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recorded for each entity in the Census Bureau’s geographic database (see “MAF/TIGER Database”). The Census Bureau provides area measurement data for both land area and water area. The water area figures include inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and territorial sea water. Inland water consists of any lake, reservoir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the Census Bureau’s geographic database. It also includes any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is recorded in that database as a twodimensional feature (rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans and related large embayments (such as Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its territories are classified as coastal and territorial waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of water are treated as inland water from the point beyond which they are narrower than 1 nautical mile across. Identification of land and inland, coastal, territorial, and Great Lakes waters is for data presentation purposes only and does not necessarily reflect their legal definitions. Land and water area measurements may disagree with the information displayed on Census Bureau maps and in the MAF/TIGER database because, for area measurement purposes, hydrologic features identified as intermittent water, glacier, or swamp are reported as land area. The water area measurement reported for some geographic entities includes water that is not included in any lower-level geographic entity. Therefore, because water is contained only in a higher-level geographic entity, summing the water measurements for all the component lower-level geographic entities will not yield the water area of that higher-level entity. This occurs, for example, where water is associated with a county but is not within the legal boundary of any county subdivision. The accuracy of any area measurement data is limited by the accuracy inherent in 1) the location and shape of the various boundary information in the MAF/TIGER database, 2) the identification, and classification of water bodies coupled with the location and shapes of the shorelines of water bodies in that database, and 3) rounding affecting the last digit in all operations that compute and/or sum the area measurements.

BLOCK
Blocks (Census Blocks) are statistical areas bounded by visible features, such as streets, roads, streams, and railroad tracks, and by nonvisible boundaries, such as selected property lines and city, township, school district, and county limits and short line-of-sight extensions of streets and roads. Generally, census blocks are small in area; for example, a block in a city bounded on all sides by streets. Census blocks in suburban and rural areas may be large, irregular, and bounded by a variety of features, such as roads, streams, and transmission lines. In remote areas, census blocks may encompass hundreds of square miles. Census blocks cover the entire territory of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas. Census blocks nest within all other tabulated census geographic entities and are the basis for all tabulated data. Census Block Numbers—Census blocks are numbered uniquely with a four-digit census block number from 0000 to 9999 within census tract, which nest within state and county. The first digit of the census block number identifies the block group. Block numbers beginning with a zero (in Block Group 0) are only associated with water-only areas.

BLOCK GROUP
Block Groups (BGs) are statistical divisions of census tracts, are generally defined to contain between 600 and 3,000 people, and are used to present data and control block numbering. A block group consists of clusters of blocks within the same census tract that have the same first digit of their four-digit census block number. For example, blocks 3001, 3002, 3003, . . ., 3999 in census tract 1210.02 belong to BG 3 in that census tract. Most BGs were delineated by local participants in the Census Bureau’s Participant Statistical Areas Program. The Census Bureau delineated BGs only where a local or tribal government declined to participate, and a regional organization or State Data Center was not available to participate. A BG usually covers a contiguous area. Each census tract contains at least one BG, and BGs are uniquely numbered within the census tract. Within the standard census geographic hierarchy, BGs never cross state, county, or census tract boundaries but may cross the boundaries of any other geographic entity. Tribal A-10 Geographic Terms and Concepts
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census tracts and tribal BGs are separate and unique geographic areas defined within federally recognized American Indian reservations and can cross state and county boundaries (see “Tribal Census Tract” and “Tribal Block Group”). The tribal census tracts and tribal block groups may be completely different from the census tracts and block groups defined by state and county. Block Group Codes—BGs have a valid code range of 0 through 9. BGs beginning with a zero only contain water area and are generally in coastal and Great Lakes water and territorial seas, but also in larger inland water bodies. For the 2010 Census, a block group 0 for the water portion can be delineated in any census tract and not just those census tracts also defined to only include water area. This is a change from Census 2000, when block groups coded 0 only existed in census tracts with a code of 0. To differentiate between county-based block groups and tribal block groups, the codes for tribal block groups use an alphabetic character (see “Tribal Block Group”).

BOUNDARY CHANGES
Many of the legal and statistical entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates decennial census data have had boundary changes between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census; that is, between January 1, 2000, and January 1, 2010. Boundary changes to legal entities result from: 1. � Annexations to or detachments from legally established governmental units. 2. � Mergers or consolidations of two or more governmental units. 3. � Establishment of new governmental units. 4. � Disincorporations or disorganizations of existing governmental units. 5. � Changes in treaties or executive orders and governmental action placing additional lands in trust. 6. � Decisions by federal, state, and local courts. 7. � Redistricting for congressional districts and state legislative districts. 8. � Ancillary changes to legal or statistical areas as a result of annexations and detachments; for example, reduction of territory for a census designated place as the result of an annexation by an adjacent incorporated place. 9. � Changes to correct errors or more accurately place boundaries relative to visible features. 10. Changes to statistical areas as the result of concept or criteria changes. All legal boundaries used for the 2010 Census are those reported to the Census Bureau to be in effect as of January 1, 2010. The statistical area boundaries also reflect a January 1, 2010, date for delineation. The legal boundaries are collected through various surveys and programs: the Boundary and Annexation Survey, Redistricting Data Program, and the School District Review Program. There is a Geographic Change User Note Indicator in data files that identifies entities for which there have been changes to boundaries or data attributes (for example, legal/statistical area description or code) between the two censuses. Statistical entity boundaries generally are reviewed by local, state, or tribal governments and can have changes to adjust boundaries to visible features to better define the geographic area each encompasses or to account for shifts and changes in the population distribution within an area. Where statistical areas have a relationship to legal area boundaries, complementary updates occur; for example, removing territory from a census designated place if annexed to an incorporated place or contracting a tribal designated statistical area if the area is added to an American Indian reservation. The historical counts shown for states, counties, county subdivisions, places, American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas, and other areas are not updated for boundary changes and thus, reflect the population and housing units in each entity as delineated at the time of each decennial census.

Geographic Terms and Concepts
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CENSUS DIVISION
Census Divisions are groupings of states and the District of Columbia that are subdivisions of the four census regions (see “Census Region”). There are nine census divisions, and each is identified by a singledigit census code. Puerto Rico and the Island Areas are not part of any census region or census division. For a list of all census regions, census divisions, and their constituent states, see Figure A-3.

CENSUS REGION
Census Regions are groupings of states and the District of Columbia that subdivide the United States for the presentation of census data. There are four census regions—Northeast, Midwest, South, and West. Each of the four census regions is divided into two or more census divisions (see “Census Division”). Each census region is identified by a single-digit census code. Puerto Rico and the Island Areas are not part of any census region or census division. For a list of all census regions, census divisions, and their constituent states, see Figure A-3.

CENSUS TRACT
Census Tracts are small, relatively permanent statistical subdivisions of a county or equivalent entity that are updated by local participants prior to each decennial census as part of the Census Bureau’s Participant Statistical Areas Program. The Census Bureau delineates census tracts in situations where no local participant existed or where state, local, or tribal governments declined to participate. The primary purpose of census tracts is to provide a stable set of geographic units for the presentation of statistical data. Census tracts generally have a population size between 1,200 and 8,000 people, with an optimum size of 4,000 people. A census tract usually covers a contiguous area; however, the spatial size of census tracts varies widely depending on the density of settlement. Census tract boundaries are delineated with the intention of being maintained over a long time so that statistical comparisons can be made from census to census. Census tracts occasionally are split due to population growth or merged as a result of substantial population decline. Census tract boundaries generally follow visible and identifiable features. They may follow nonvisible legal boundaries, such as minor civil division (MCD) or incorporated place boundaries in some states and situations, to allow for census-tract-to-governmental-unit relationships where the governmental boundaries tend to remain unchanged between censuses. State and county boundaries always are census tract boundaries in the standard census geographic hierarchy. Tribal census tracts are a unique geographic entity defined within federally recognized American Indian reservations and off-reservation trust lands and can cross state and county boundaries. Tribal census tracts may be completely different from the census tracts and block groups defined by state and county (see “Tribal Census Tract”). Census Tract Codes and Numbers—Census tracts are identified by an up to four-digit integer number and may have an optional two-digit suffix; for example 1457.02 or 23. The census tract codes consist of six digits with an implied decimal between the fourth and fifth digit corresponding to the basic census tract number but with leading zeroes and trailing zeroes for census tracts without a suffix. The tract number examples above would have codes of 145702 and 002300, respectively. Some ranges of census tract numbers in the 2010 Census are used to identify distinctive types of census tracts. The code range in the 9400s is used for those census tracts with a majority of population, housing, or land area associated with an American Indian area and matches the numbering used in Census 2000. The code range in the 9800s is new for 2010 and is used to specifically identify special land-use census tracts; that is, census tracts defined to encompass a large area with little or no residential population with special characteristics, such as large parks or employment areas. The range of census tracts in the 9900s represents census tracts delineated specifically to cover large bodies of water. This is different from Census 2000 when water-only census tracts were assigned codes of all zeroes (000000); 000000 is no longer used as a census tract code for the 2010 Census. A-12 Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

The Census Bureau uses suffixes to help identify census tract changes for comparison purposes. Census tract suffixes may range from .01 to .98. As part of local review of existing census tracts before each census, some census tracts may have grown enough in population size to qualify as more than one census tract. When a census tract is split, the split parts usually retain the basic number but receive different suffixes. For example, if census tract 14 is split, the new tract numbers would be 14.01 and 14.02. In a few counties, local participants request major changes to, and renumbering of, the census tracts; however, this is generally discouraged. Changes to individual census tract boundaries usually do not result in census tract numbering changes. Tribal Census Tracts in American Indian Areas—The Census Bureau introduced the concept of tribal census tracts for the first time for Census 2000. Tribal census tracts for that census consisted of the standard county-based census tracts tabulated within American Indian areas, thus allowing for the tracts to ignore state and county boundaries for tabulation. The Census Bureau assigned the 9400 range of numbers to identify specific tribal census tracts; however, not all tribal census tracts used this numbering scheme. For the 2010 Census, tribal census tracts no longer are tied to or numbered in the same way as the county-based census tracts (see “Tribal Census Tract”).

CODES FOR GEOGRAPHIC ENTITIES
The Census Bureau and other federal agencies assign codes to geographic entities to facilitate the organization, presentation, and exchange of statistical data and other information. Geographic entity codes allow for the unambiguous identification of individual entities, generally within a specific, higher-level geographic entity (for example, county codes are assigned uniquely within each state). For geographic entities that have names (such as states, counties, places, county subdivisions, urban areas, and metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas), codes generally are assigned alphabetically based on name. Census Bureau data products contain several types of geographic entity codes: Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and Census Bureau codes. Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS)—These are codes formerly known as Federal Information Processing Standards codes, until the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) announced its decision in 2005 to remove geographic entity codes from its oversight. The Census Bureau continues to maintain and issue codes for geographic entities covered under FIPS oversight, albeit with a revised meaning for the FIPS acronym. Geographic entities covered under FIPS include states, counties, congressional districts, core based statistical areas, places, county subdivisions, subminor civil divisions, consolidated cities, and all types of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas. FIPS codes are assigned alphabetically according to the name of the geographic entity and may change to maintain alphabetic sort when new entities are created or names change. FIPS codes for specific geographic entity types are usually unique within the next highest level of geographic entity with which a nesting relationship exists. For example, FIPS state, congressional district, and core based statistical area codes are unique within nation; FIPS county, place, county subdivision, and subminor civil division codes are unique within state. The codes for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas also are unique within state; those areas in multiple states will have different codes for each state. American National Standards Institute (ANSI)—With the removal of geographic entities from Federal Information Processing Standards oversight, the Census Bureau and other federal agencies have sought American National Standards Institute (ANSI) oversight authority for geographic entity codes. These codes are referred to as “National Standard” codes in some Census Bureau products. Geographic entities covered under ANSI include states, counties, congressional districts, core based statistical areas and related statistical areas, places, county subdivisions, consolidated cities, subminor civil divisions, and all types of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas—Alaska Native regional corporations, Alaska Native village statistical areas, American Indian reservation and off-reservation trust lands, American Indian tribal subdivisions, Hawaiian home lands, Oklahoma tribal statistical areas, state designated tribal statistical areas, and tribal designated statistical areas. Geographic Terms and Concepts
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Relationship between FIPS and ANSI codes—Geographic entities for which NIST formerly provided Federal Information Processing Standards oversight will continue to be referred to as FIPS (Federal Information Processing Series) codes in some Census Bureau data products, despite the Census Bureau having sought ANSI oversight authority. These geographic entities include states, counties, congressional districts, and core based statistical areas and related statistical areas. The Census Bureau continues to maintain and issue codes for these entities following the same structure and without change to existing codes, except when necessary to maintain alphabetic sorting based on names of entities. The Census Bureau also continues to maintain and issue five-digit FIPS codes (formerly FIPS 55) for places, county subdivisions, consolidated cities, subminor civil divisions, Alaska Native Regional Corporations, and all types of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas but is not seeking ANSI oversight authority for these entity codes. The U.S. Geological Survey has ANSI oversight authority for its Geographic Names Information System identifier (GNIS ID), which has been adopted as a National Standard (NS) code for states, counties, places, county subdivisions, subminor civil divisions, consolidated cities, Alaska Native Regional Corporations, and all types of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas. The Census Bureau will include the GNIS ID for these entities in its data products, portrayed as an eight-digit character numeric code and identified as “ANSI.” NS codes (GNIS IDs) will not sort geographic entities in alphabetical order based on name or title, as is the case with FIPS codes. Census Bureau codes—The Census Bureau assigns and issues codes for a number of geographic entities for which FIPS or ANSI codes are not available, and sometimes in addition to FIPS and ANSI codes. Geographic entities for which census codes are assigned and issued in Census Bureau data products include regions, divisions, census tracts, block groups, census blocks, urban areas, and all types of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas. Some codes—voting district, state legislative district, and school district—use standards established by the states—or for school districts, the U.S. Department of Education.

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT
Congressional Districts are the 435 areas from which people are elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. After the apportionment of congressional seats among the states based on decennial census population counts, each state with multiple seats is responsible for establishing congressional districts for the purpose of electing representatives. Each congressional district is to be as equal in population to all other congressional districts in a state as practicable. For the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and each Island Area, a separate code is used to identify the entire areas of these state-equivalent entities as having a single nonvoting delegate. Congressional District Codes—Congressional districts are identified by a two-character numeric Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code numbered uniquely within state. The District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas have code 98 assigned identifying their nonvoting delegate status with respect to representation in Congress: 01 to 53—Congressional district codes 00—At large (single district for state) 98—Nonvoting delegate

CONSOLIDATED CITY
Consolidated City—A consolidated government is a unit of local government for which the functions of an incorporated place and its county or minor civil division (MCD) have merged. This action results in both the primary incorporated place and the county or MCD continuing to exist as legal entities, even though the county or MCD performs few or no governmental functions and has few or no elected officials. Where this occurs—and where one or more other incorporated places in the county or MCD continue to function as separate governments, even though they have been included in the consolidated government— the primary incorporated place is referred to as a consolidated city. The Census Bureau classifies the

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Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

separately incorporated places within the consolidated city as place entities and creates a separate place (balance) record for the portion of the consolidated city not within any other place. Consolidated City (Balance) Portions refer to the areas of a consolidated city not included in another separately incorporated place. For example, Butte-Silver Bow, MT, is a consolidated city (former Butte city and Silver Bow County) that includes the separately incorporated municipality of Walkerville city. The area of the consolidated city that is not in Walkerville city is assigned to Butte-Silver Bow (balance). The name always includes the “(balance)” identifier (see “Place”).

CORE BASED STATISTICAL AREAS AND RELATED STATISTICAL AREAS
Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs) consist of the county or counties or equivalent entities associated with at least one core (urbanized area or urban cluster) of at least 10,000 population, plus adjacent counties having a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured through commuting ties with the counties associated with the core. The general concept of a CBSA is that of a core area containing a substantial population nucleus, together with adjacent communities having a high degree of economic and social integration with that core. The term “core based statistical area” became effective in 2003 and refers collectively to metropolitan statistical areas and micropolitan statistical areas. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines CBSAs to provide a nationally consistent set of geographic entities for the United States and Puerto Rico for use in tabulating and presenting statistical data. Current CBSAs are based on application of the 2000 standards (published in the Federal Register of December 27, 2000) with Census 2000 data. The first set of areas defined based on the 2000 standards were announced on June 6, 2003; subsequent updates have been made to the universe of CBSAs and related statistical areas. No CBSAs are defined in the Island Areas. Statistical areas related to CBSAs include metropolitan divisions, combined statistical areas (CSAs), New England city and town areas (NECTAs), NECTA divisions, and combined NECTAs. Combined New England City and Town Areas (Combined NECTAs) consist of two or more adjacent New England city and town areas (NECTAs) that have substantial employment interchange. The NECTAs that combine to create a combined NECTA retain separate identities within the larger combined NECTA. Because combined NECTAs represent groupings of NECTAs, they should not be ranked or compared with individual NECTAs. Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs) consist of two or more adjacent CBSAs that have substantial employment interchange. The CBSAs that combine to create a CSA retain separate identities within the larger CSA. Because CSAs represent groupings of metropolitan and/or micropolitan statistical areas, they should not be ranked or compared with individual metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas. Metropolitan Divisions are smaller groupings of counties or equivalent entities defined within a metropolitan statistical area containing a single core with a population of at least 2.5 million. Not all metropolitan statistical areas with urbanized areas of this size will contain metropolitan divisions. A metropolitan division consists of one or more main/secondary counties that represent an employment center or centers, plus adjacent counties associated with the main/secondary county or counties through commuting ties. Because metropolitan divisions represent subdivisions of larger metropolitan statistical areas, it is not appropriate to rank or compare metropolitan divisions with metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas. It would be appropriate to rank and compare metropolitan divisions. Metropolitan Statistical Areas are CBSAs associated with at least one urbanized area that has a population of at least 50,000. The metropolitan statistical area comprises the central county or counties or equivalent entities containing the core, plus adjacent outlying counties having a high degree of social and economic integration with the central county or counties as measured through commuting. Micropolitan Statistical Areas are CBSAs associated with at least one urban cluster that has a population of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000. The micropolitan statistical area comprises the central county or counties or equivalent entities containing the core, plus adjacent outlying counties having a Geographic Terms and Concepts
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high degree of social and economic integration with the central county or counties as measured through commuting. New England City and Town Areas (NECTAs) are an alternative set of geographic entities, similar in concept to the county-based CBSAs defined nationwide, that OMB defines in New England based on county subdivisions—usually cities and towns. NECTAs are defined using the same criteria as county-based CBSAs, and, similar to CBSAs, NECTAs are categorized as metropolitan or micropolitan. New England City and Town Area (NECTA) Divisions are smaller groupings of cities and towns defined within a NECTA containing a single core with a population of at least 2.5 million. A NECTA division consists of a main city or town that represents an employment center, plus adjacent cities and towns associated with the main city or town through commuting ties. Each NECTA division must contain a total population of 100,000 or more. Because NECTA divisions represent subdivisions of larger NECTAs, it is not appropriate to rank or compare NECTA divisions with NECTAs. It would be appropriate to rank and compare NECTA divisions. Principal Cities of a CBSA (or NECTA) include the largest incorporated place with a population of at least 10,000 in the CBSA, or if no incorporated place of at least 10,000 population is present in the CBSA, the largest incorporated place or census designated place (CDP) in the CBSA. Principal cities also include any additional incorporated place or CDP with a population of at least 250,000 or in which 100,000 or more persons work; any additional incorporated place or CDP with a population of at least 50,000 and in which the number of jobs meets or exceeds the number of employed residents; and any additional incorporated place or CDP with a population of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 and at least one-third the population size of the largest place and in which the number of jobs meets or exceeds the number of employed residents. Note that there are some places designated as principal cities of NECTAs that are not principal cities of a CBSA. Core Based Statistical Area Codes—Metropolitan statistical areas, micropolitan statistical areas, NECTAs, metropolitan divisions, and NECTA divisions are identified using a five-digit numeric code that is assigned alphabetically based on title and is unique within the nation. The combined statistical area and combined NECTAs are identified using a three-digit numeric code, also assigned alphabetically based on title and unique within the nation. Codes, length, and ranges are: CBSA entity Metropolitan statistical area . . . . . . . . . . Micropolitan statistical area . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England city and town area (NECTA) NECTA division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined statistical area . . . . . . . . . . . . Combined NECTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Length Five Five Five Five Five Three Three digits digits digits digits digits digits digits Range* 10000–49999 10000–49999 10004–49994 70000–79999 70004–79994 100–599 700–799

* Metropolitan divisions and NECTA divisions are distinguished from metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas and NECTAs by codes that end in “4.” Metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas and NECTAs cannot end in “4.”

COUNTY OR STATISTICALLY EQUIVALENT ENTITY
The primary legal divisions of most states are termed counties. In Louisiana, these divisions are known as parishes. In Alaska, which has no counties, the equivalent entities are the organized boroughs, city and boroughs, municipalities, and census areas; the latter of which are delineated cooperatively for statistical purposes by the state of Alaska and the Census Bureau. In four states (Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and Virginia), there are one or more incorporated places that are independent of any county organization and thus constitute primary divisions of their states. These incorporated places are known as independent cities and are treated as equivalent entities for purposes of data presentation. The District of Columbia and Guam have no primary divisions, and each area is considered an equivalent entity for purposes of A-16 Geographic Terms and Concepts
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data presentation. All of the counties in Connecticut and Rhode Island and nine counties in Massachusetts were dissolved as functioning governmental entities; however, the Census Bureau continues to present data for these historical entities in order to provide comparable geographic units at the county level of the geographic hierarchy for these states and represents them as nonfunctioning legal entities in data products. The Census Bureau treats the following entities as equivalents of counties for purposes of data presentation: municipios in Puerto Rico, districts and islands in American Samoa, municipalities in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and islands in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each county or statistically equivalent entity is assigned a three-character numeric Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code based on alphabetical sequence that is unique within state and an eight-digit National Standard feature identifier.

COUNTY SUBDIVISION
County Subdivisions are the primary divisions of counties and equivalent entities. They include census county divisions, census subareas, minor civil divisions, and unorganized territories and can be classified as either legal or statistical. Each county subdivision is assigned a five-character numeric Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code based on alphabetical sequence within state and an eight-digit National Standard feature identifier. Legal Entities Minor civil divisions (MCDs) are the primary governmental or administrative divisions of a county in many states (parishes in Louisiana) and the county equivalents in Puerto Rico and the Island Areas. MCDs in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas represent many different kinds of legal entities with a wide variety of governmental and/or administrative functions. MCDs include areas variously designated as barrios, barrios-pueblo, boroughs, charter townships, commissioner districts, election districts, election precincts, gores, grants, locations, magisterial districts, parish governing authority districts, plantations, purchases, reservations, supervisor’s districts, towns, and townships. The Census Bureau recognizes MCDs in 29 states, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas. The District of Columbia has no primary divisions and is considered equivalent to an MCD for statistical purposes. (It is also considered a state equivalent and a county equivalent.) The 29* states in which MCDs are recognized are: Arkansas Connecticut Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Nebraska New Hampshire New Jersey New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Dakota Tennessee Vermont Virginia West Virginia Wisconsin

* Tennessee, a state with statistical census county divisions (CCDs) in 2000, reverted to MCDs in 2008.

In some states, all or some incorporated places are not part of any MCD; these places are termed independent places. Independent places also serve as primary legal subdivisions and have a Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) county subdivision code and National Standard (ANSI) code that is the same as the FIPS and ANSI place code. In nine states—Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Wisconsin—all incorporated places are independent places. In other states, incorporated places are part of, or dependent within, the MCDs in which they are located, or the pattern is mixed—some incorporated places are independent of MCDs and others are included within one or more MCDs. The MCDs in 12 states (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin) also serve as general-purpose Geographic Terms and Concepts
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local governments that can perform the same governmental functions as incorporated places. The Census Bureau presents data for these MCDs in all data products for which place data are provided. In New York and Maine, American Indian reservations (AIRs) generally exist outside the jurisdiction of any town (MCD) and thus also serve as the equivalent of MCDs for purposes of data presentation. In states with MCDs, the Census Bureau assigns a default FIPS county subdivision code of 00000 and ANSI code of eight zeroes in some coastal, territorial sea, and Great Lakes water where county subdivisions do not legally extend into the Great Lakes or out to the 3-mile limit. Statistical Entities Census county divisions (CCDs) are areas delineated by the Census Bureau in cooperation with state, tribal, and local officials for statistical purposes. CCDs have no legal function and are not governmental units. CCD boundaries usually follow visible features and usually coincide with census tract boundaries. The name of each CCD is based on a place, county, or well-known local name that identifies its location. CCDs exist where: 1. There are no legally established MCDs. 2. The legally established MCDs do not have governmental or administrative purposes. 3. The boundaries of the MCDs change frequently. 4. The MCDs are not generally known to the public. CCDs exist within the following 20* states: Alabama Arizona California Colorado Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Kentucky Montana Nevada New Mexico Oklahoma Oregon South Carolina Texas Utah Washington Wyoming

* Tennessee, a CCD state in 2000, reverted to a MCD state in 2008.

Census subareas are statistical subdivisions of boroughs, city and boroughs, municipalities, and census areas, all of which are statistical equivalent entities for counties in Alaska. The state of Alaska and the Census Bureau cooperatively delineate the census subareas to serve as the statistical equivalents of MCDs. Unorganized territories (UTs) are defined by the Census Bureau in nine MCD states where portions of counties or equivalent entities are not included in any legally established MCD or incorporated place. The Census Bureau recognizes such separate pieces of territory as one or more separate county subdivisions for census purposes. It assigns each unorganized territory a descriptive name, followed by the designation “UT” and a county subdivision FIPS and ANSI code. The following states have unorganized territories: Arkansas Indiana Iowa Maine Minnesota New York North Carolina North Dakota South Dakota

GEOGRAPHIC AREA ATTRIBUTES
The Census Bureau collects and maintains information describing selected attributes and characteristics of geographic areas. These attributes are Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) class code, functional status, legal/statistical area description, internal point, and name of geographic entities. FIPS class codes describe the general characteristics of a geographic area related to its legal or statistical status, governmental status, and in some cases relationship to other geographic entities. Class codes A-18 Geographic Terms and Concepts
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exist for counties; county subdivisions; subminor civil divisions; places; consolidated cities; Alaska Native Regional Corporations; American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian areas; and American Indian tribal subdivisions. Functional status describes whether a geographic entity is a functioning governmental unit, has an inactive government, is an administrative area without a functioning government, or is a statistical area identified and defined solely for tabulation and presentation of statistical data. Functional status codes are: A � Active government providing primary general-purpose functions. B � Active government that is partially consolidated with another government but with separate officials providing primary general-purpose functions. C � Active government consolidated with another government with a single set of officials. E � Active government providing special-purpose functions. F � Fictitious entity created to fill the Census Bureau’s geographic hierarchy. G � Active government that is subordinate to another unit of government and thus, not considered a functioning government. I � Inactive governmental unit that has the power to provide primary special-purpose functions.

N � Nonfunctioning legal entity. S Statistical entity. Internal point—The Census Bureau calculates an internal point (latitude and longitude coordinates) for each geographic entity. For many geographic entities, the internal point is at or near the geographic center of the entity. For some irregularly shaped entities (such as those shaped like a crescent), the calculated geographic center may be located outside the boundaries of the entity. In such instances, the internal point is identified as a point inside the entity boundaries nearest to the calculated geographic center and, if possible, within a land polygon. Legal/statistical area description (LSAD)—The LSAD describes the particular typology for each geographic entity; that is, whether the entity is a borough, city, county, town, or township, among others. For legal entities, the LSAD reflects the term that appears in legal documentation pertaining to the entity, such as a treaty, charter, legislation, resolution, or ordinance. For statistical entities, the LSAD is the term assigned by the Census Bureau or other agency defining the entity. The LSAD code is a two-character field that corresponds to a description of the legal or statistical type of entity and identifies whether the LSAD term should be capitalized and should precede or follow the name of the geographic entity. Note that the same LSAD code is assigned to entities at different levels of the geographic hierarchy when they share the same LSAD. For example, the Census Bureau assigns the same LSAD code (“21”) to boroughs in New York and Connecticut, although they are county subdivisions in the former and incorporated places in the latter. Name—Each geographic entity included in Census Bureau products has a name. For most geographic entities, the name is derived from the official legally recognized name, is assigned by local officials participating in Census Bureau statistical area programs, or is based on component entities and determined according to specified criteria. For legal entities, the name appearing in Census Bureau products may be the more commonly used name rather than the name as it appears in legal documents. For example, “Virginia” instead of “the Commonwealth of Virginia”; “Baltimore” instead of “City of Baltimore.” In some instances, the name for an entity in Census Bureau products will reflect the official name as well as a more commonly used name listed parenthetically; i.e., San Buenaventura (Ventura), CA, or Bath (Berkeley Springs), WV. For some types of geographic entities, the name reflected in Census Bureau products may be the geographic entity code assigned by local officials. For example, a census tract’s name is the actual number assigned by local officials, such as 1.01, whereas the census tract code would reflect a full four-digit base code and two-digit suffix (for example, for the preceding tract named 1.01, 000101). Geographic Terms and Concepts
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GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM
The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is the federal standard for geographic nomenclature. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed the GNIS for the U.S. Board on Geographic Names as the official repository of domestic geographic names data; the official vehicle for geographic names use by all departments of the federal government; and the source for applying geographic names to federal electronic and printed products. The GNIS contains information about physical and cultural geographic features of all types in the United States and its territories, current and historical, but not including roads and highways. The database holds the federally recognized name of each feature and defines the feature location by state, county, USGS topographic map, and geographic coordinates. Other attributes include names or spellings other than the official name, feature designations, feature classification, historical and descriptive information, and, for some categories, the geometric boundaries.

GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM IDENTIFIER
The Geographic Names Information System Identifier (GNIS ID) is a variable length, permanent, numeric identifier of up to ten digits in length that identifies each entity uniquely within the nation. The GNIS is the new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) national standard code for several entity types. Because each entity’s GNIS ID is permanent, it will not change if the entity changes its name or if creation of a new entity changes the alphabetic sort. (Federal Information Processing Series codes are assigned based on the alphabetic sorting of entity names within a state and occasionally require changing codes to maintain the alphabetic sort.) The GNIS IDs are assigned sequentially and stored in a right-justified, variable-length, numeric field without leading zeroes. The GNIS now contains more than 2.6 million sequential records, thus no GNIS ID currently exceeds seven digits. The Census Bureau portrays the GNIS ID in its data products as a fixed-width eight-character field with leading zeroes.

ISLAND AREAS OF THE UNITED STATES
The Island Areas of the United States are American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (Northern Mariana Islands), and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Census Bureau treats the Island Areas as entities that are statistically equivalent to states for data presentation purposes; data for the Island Areas, however, are presented separately from data for the United States and Puerto Rico. Geographic definitions specific to the Island Areas are shown in the appropriate publications and documentation that accompany the data products for the Island Areas. Sometimes the Island Areas are referred to as “Island Territories” or “Insular Areas.” For the 1990 and previous censuses, the U.S. Census Bureau referred to the entities as “Outlying Areas.” Separate from the Island Areas is the term “U.S. Minor Outlying Islands.” The U.S. Minor Outlying Islands refers to certain small islands under U.S. jurisdiction in the Caribbean and Pacific: Baker Island, Howland Island, Jarvis Island, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, Midway Islands, Navassa Island, Palmyra Atoll, and Wake Island. These areas usually are not part of standard data products.

MAF/TIGER DATABASE
MAF/TIGER is an acronym for the Master Address File/Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing system or database. It is a digital (computer-readable) geographic database that automates the mapping and related geographic activities required to support the Census Bureau’s census and survey programs. The Census Bureau developed the TIGER® system to automate the geographic support processes needed to meet the major geographic needs of the 1990 census: producing cartographic products to support data collection and map presentations, providing geographic structure for tabulation and dissemination of the collected statistical data, assigning residential and employer addresses to the correct geographic location and relating those locations to the geographic entities used for data tabulation, and so forth. During the 1990s, the Census Bureau developed an independent Master Address File (MAF) to support field operations and allocation of housing units for tabulations. After Census 2000, both the A-20 Geographic Terms and Concepts
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address-based MAF and geographic TIGER® databases merged to form MAF/TIGER. The content of the MAF/TIGER database is undergoing continuous updates and is made available to the public through a variety of TIGER/Line® shapefiles.

PLACE
Incorporated Places are those reported to the Census Bureau as legally in existence as of January 1, 2010, as reported in the latest Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS), under the laws of their respective states. An incorporated place is established to provide governmental functions for a concentration of people as opposed to a minor civil division, which generally is created to provide services or administer an area without regard, necessarily, to population. Places always are within a single state or equivalent entity, but may extend across county and county subdivision boundaries. An incorporated place usually is a city, town, village, or borough, but can have other legal descriptions. For Census Bureau data tabulation and presentation purposes, incorporated places exclude: • • • Boroughs in Alaska (treated as statistical equivalents of counties). Towns in the New England states, New York, and Wisconsin (treated as MCDs). Boroughs in New York (treated as MCDs).

Census Designated Places (CDPs) are the statistical counterparts of incorporated places, and are delineated to provide data for settled concentrations of population that are identifiable by name but are not legally incorporated under the laws of the state in which they are located. The boundaries usually are defined in cooperation with local or tribal officials and generally updated prior to each decennial census. These boundaries, which usually coincide with visible features or the boundary of an adjacent incorporated place or another legal entity boundary, have no legal status, nor do these places have officials elected to serve traditional municipal functions. CDP boundaries may change from one decennial census to the next with changes in the settlement pattern; a CDP with the same name as in an earlier census does not necessarily have the same boundary. CDPs must be contained within a single state and may not extend into an incorporated place. There are no population size requirements for CDPs. Hawaii is the only state that has no incorporated places recognized by the Census Bureau. All places shown in decennial census data products for Hawaii are CDPs. By agreement with the state of Hawaii, the Census Bureau does not show data separately for the city of Honolulu, which is coextensive with Honolulu County. In Puerto Rico, which also does not have incorporated places, the Census Bureau recognizes only CDPs and refers to them as comunidades or zonas urbanas. Guam also has only CDPs. Place Codes are of two types. The five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) place code is assigned based on alphabetical sequence within a state. If place names are duplicated within a state and they represent distinctly different areas, a separate code is assigned to each place name alphabetically by the primary county in which each place is located, or if both places are in the same county, they are assigned alphabetically by their legal descriptions (for example, “city” before “village”). Places also are assigned an eight-digit National Standard (ANSI) code. Dependent and Independent Places refers to the relationship of places to the county subdivisions. Depending on the state, incorporated places are either dependent within, or independent of, county subdivisions, or there is a mixture of dependent and independent places in the state and in a county. Dependent places are part of the county subdivision; the county subdivision code of the place is the same as that of the underlying county subdivision(s) but is different from the place code. Independent places are not part of any minor civil division (MCD) and serve as primary county subdivisions. The independent place FIPS code usually is the same as that used for the MCD for the place. The only exception is if the place is independent of the MCDs in a state (Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Nebraska, North Carolina, and Virginia) in which the FIPS MCD codes are in the 90000 range. Then, the FIPS MCD and FIPS place codes will differ. CDPs always are dependent within county subdivisions and all places are dependent within statistical county subdivisions. Geographic Terms and Concepts
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Consolidated City (Balance) Portions refer to the areas of a consolidated city not included in another separately incorporated place. For example, Butte-Silver Bow, MT, is a consolidated city (former Butte city and Silver Bow County) that includes the separately incorporated municipality of Walkerville city. The area of the consolidated city that is not in Walkerville city is assigned to Butte-Silver Bow (balance). The name of the area of a consolidated city not specifically within a separately incorporated place always includes the “(balance)” identifier. Balance portions of consolidated cities are included with other places in Census Bureau products.

POPULATION AND HOUSING UNIT DENSITY
Population and housing unit density are computed by dividing the total population or number of housing units within a geographic entity by the land area of that entity measured in square miles or in square kilometers. Density is expressed as “population per square mile (kilometer)” or “housing units per square mile (kilometer).”

PUBLIC USE MICRODATA AREAS
Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs) are geographic areas for which the Census Bureau provides selected extracts of raw data from a small sample of census records that are screened to protect confidentiality. These extracts are referred to as public use microdata sample (PUMS) files. For the 2010 Census, each state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and some Island Area participants delineated PUMAs for use in presenting PUMS data based on a 5 percent sample of decennial census or American Community Survey data. These areas are required to contain at least 100,000 people. This is different from Census 2000 when two types of PUMAs were defined: a 5 percent PUMA as for 2010 and an additional super-PUMA designed to provide a 1 percent sample. The PUMAs are identified by a five-digit census code unique within state.

PUERTO RICO
The Census Bureau treats the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico as the statistical equivalent of a state for data presentation purposes. Municipio The primary legal divisions of Puerto Rico are termed “municipios.” For data presentation purposes, the Census Bureau treats a municipio as the equivalent of a county in the United States. Barrio, Barrio-Pueblo, and Subbarrio The Census Bureau recognizes barrios and barrios-pueblo as the primary legal divisions of municipios. These entities are similar to the minor civil divisions (MCDs) used for reporting data in 29 states of the United States. Subbarrios in 23 municipios are the primary legal subdivisions of the barrios-pueblo and some barrios. The Census Bureau presents the same types of statistical data for these subminor civil divisions (sub-MCDs) as it does for the barrios and barrios-pueblo. (There is no geographic entity in the United States equivalent to the subbarrio.) Zona Urbana and Comunidad There are no incorporated places in Puerto Rico; instead, the Census Bureau provides data for two types of census designated places (CDPs): zonas urbanas, representing the governmental center of each municipio, and comunidades, representing other settlements. There are no minimum population size requirements for zonas urbanas and comunidades. Some types of geographic entities do not apply in Puerto Rico. For instance, Puerto Rico is not in any census region or census division (see also “Congressional District”).

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SCHOOL DISTRICTS (ELEMENTARY, SECONDARY, AND UNIFIED)
School Districts are geographic entities within which state, county, local officials, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, or the U.S. Department of Defense provide public educational services for the area’s residents. The Census Bureau obtains the boundaries, names, local education agency codes, and school district levels for school districts from state and local school officials for the primary purpose of providing the U.S. Department of Education with estimates of the number of children “at risk” within each school district, county, and state. This information serves as the basis for the Department of Education to determine the annual allocation of Title I funding to states and school districts. The Census Bureau tabulates data for three types of school districts: elementary, secondary, and unified. Each school district is assigned a five-digit code that is unique within state. School district codes are the local education agency number assigned by the Department of Education and are not necessarily in alphabetical order by school district name. The elementary school districts provide education to the lower grade/age levels and the secondary school districts provide education to the upper grade/age levels. Unified school districts provide education to children of all school ages in their service areas. In general, where there is a unified school district, no elementary or secondary school district exists; and where there is an elementary school district, the secondary school district may or may not exist. The Census Bureau’s representation of school districts in various data products is based both on the grade range that a school district operates and also the grade range for which the school district is financially responsible. For example, a school district is defined as an elementary school district if its operational grade range is less than the full kindergarten through 12 or prekindergarten through 12 grade range (for example, K–6 or pre-K–8). These elementary school districts do not provide direct educational services for grades 7–12, 9–12, or similar ranges. Some elementary school districts are financially responsible for the education of all school-aged children within their service areas and rely on other school districts to provide service for those grade ranges that are not operated by these elementary school districts. In these situations, in order to allocate all school-aged children to these school districts, the secondary school district code field is blank. For elementary school districts where the operational grade range and financially responsible grade range are the same, the secondary school district code field will contain a secondary school district code. There are no situations where an elementary school district does not exist and a secondary school district exists in Census Bureau records.

STATE OR STATISTICALLY EQUIVALENT ENTITY
States and Equivalent Entities are the primary governmental divisions of the United States. In addition to the 50 states, the Census Bureau treats the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands as the statistical equivalents of states for the purpose of data presentation.

STATE LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS (UPPER AND LOWER CHAMBERS)
State Legislative Districts (SLDs) are the areas from which members are elected to state legislatures. The Census Bureau first reported data for SLDs as part of the 2000 Public Law (P .L.) 94-171 Redistricting Data File. Current SLDs (2010 Election Cycle)—States participating in Phase 1 of the 2010 Census Redistricting Data Program voluntarily provided the Census Bureau with the 2006 election cycle boundaries, codes, and, in some cases, names for their SLDs. All 50 states, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, participated in Phase 1, State Legislative District Project (SLDP) of the 2010 Census Redistricting Data Program. States subsequently provided legal changes to those plans through the Redistricting Data Office and/or corrections as part of Phase 2 of the 2010 Census Redistricting Data Program, as needed.

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The SLDs embody the upper (senate—SLDU) and lower (house—SLDL) chambers of the state legislature. Nebraska has a unicameral legislature and the District of Columbia has a single council, both of which the Census Bureau treats as upper-chamber legislative areas for the purpose of data presentation. A unique three-character census code, identified by state participants, is assigned to each SLD within a state. In Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Ohio, and Puerto Rico, state officials did not define the SLDs to cover all of the state or state equivalent area (usually bodies of water). In these areas with no SLDs defined, the code “ZZZ” has been assigned, which is treated within state as a single SLD for purposes of data presentation. Maryland also has areas with no SLDs defined; in Maryland, these areas are coded with an initial “Z” by county or equivalent and treated as a unique SLD by county or equivalent. In Nebraska and the District of Columbia, the Census Bureau assigned the code 999 to represent a single SLDL where legally none exist. SLD Names—The Census Bureau first reported names for SLDs as part of Phase 1 of the 2010 Census Redistricting Data Program. The SLD names with their translated legal/statistical area description are associated only with the current SLDs. Not all states provided names for their SLDs, therefore the code (or number) also serves as the name.

TRIBAL BLOCK GROUP
The 2010 tribal block group concept and criteria are completely different from those used in 2000. For the Census 2000, tribal block groups were the standard state-county-census tract-block group areas retabulated under an American Indian area hierarchy; that is, American Indian area-tribal census tracttribal block group. Tribal block groups only were applicable to legal federally recognized American Indian reservation and off-reservation trust land areas. Tribal block groups were defined to provide statistically significant sample data for small areas within American Indian areas, particularly those American Indian areas that crossed state or county boundaries where these boundaries were not meaningful for statistical purposes. The 2000 tribal block groups used the block group numbers and comprised all blocks beginning with a single number. The 2010 tribal block groups are defined independently of the standard county-based block group delineation. For federally recognized American Indian tribes with reservations or off-reservation trust land and a population less than 1,200, a single tribal block group is defined. Tribal participants in qualifying areas with a population greater than 1,200 could define additional block groups within their reservation and/or off-reservation trust land without regard to the standard block group configuration. Tribal block groups will contain blocks beginning with the same number as the standard county-based block group and could contain seemingly duplicate block numbers. To better identify and differentiate tribal block groups from county-based block groups, tribal block groups use the letter range A through K (except “I,” which could be confused with a number “1”) to identify and code the tribal block group. Tribal block groups nest within tribal census tract.

TRIBAL CENSUS TRACT
The 2010 tribal census tract concept and criteria are completely different from those used in 2000. Tribal census tracts (also known as tribal tracts) in 2000 were the standard state-county-census tract areas retabulated under an American Indian area hierarchy; that is, American Indian area-tribal census tract. Federally recognized tribes with a reservation or off-reservation trust land delineated tribal census tracts working with local census tract participants to produce a single census tract plan. Tribal census tracts were designed to be permanent statistical divisions of American Indian areas for the presentation of comparable data between censuses, particularly for those American Indian areas that crossed state or county boundaries where these boundaries were not meaningful for statistical purposes. For 2010, tribal census tracts are defined independently of the standard county-based tract delineation. For federally recognized American Indian tribes with reservations or off-reservation trust land and a

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population less than 2,400, a single tribal census tract is defined. Qualifying areas with a population greater than 2,400 could define additional tribal census tracts within their area. In 2000, the tract number range of 9400 through 9499 was reserved for tribal census tracts and was required for those tribal census tracts that crossed state or county boundaries. Not all tribal census tracts in 2000, however, used this range. For 2010, tribal census tract codes will be six characters long with a leading “T” alphabetic character followed by five numeric codes having an implied decimal between the fourth and fifth character; for example, T01000, which translates as tribal census tract 10. Tribal block groups will nest within tribal census tract. Since individual blocks are defined within the standard statecounty-census tract hierarchy, a tribal census tract can contain seemingly duplicate block numbers, thus tribal census tracts cannot be used to uniquely identify census blocks.

UNITED STATES
The United States consists of the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

URBAN AND RURAL
For the 2010 Census, the Census Bureau classified as urban all territory, population, and housing units located within urbanized areas (UAs) and urban clusters (UCs), both defined using the same criteria. The Census Bureau delineates UA and UC boundaries that represent densely developed territory, encompassing residential, commercial, and other nonresidential urban land uses. In general, this territory consists of areas of high population density and urban land use resulting in a representation of the “urban footprint.” Rural consists of all territory, population, and housing units located outside UAs and UCs. For the 2010 Census, the urban and rural classification was applied to the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Urbanized Areas (UAs)—An urbanized area consists of densely developed territory that contains 50,000 or more people. The Census Bureau delineates UAs to provide a better separation of urban and rural territory, population, and housing in the vicinity of large places. Urban Clusters (UCs)—An urban cluster consists of densely developed territory that has at least 2,500 people but fewer than 50,000 people. The Census Bureau first introduced the UC concept for Census 2000 to provide a more consistent and accurate measure of urban population, housing, and territory throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas. Urban Area Titles and Codes—The title of each UA and UC may contain up to three incorporated place or census designated place (CDP) names and will include the two-letter U.S. Postal Service abbreviation for each state or statistically equivalent entity into which the UA or UC extends. However, if the UA or UC does not contain an incorporated place or CDP the urban area title will include the single name of a minor , civil division or populated place recognized by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Geographic Names Information System. Each UC and UA is assigned a five-digit numeric census code based on a national alphabetical sequence of all urban area names. A separate flag is included in data tabulation files to differentiate between UAs and UCs. In printed reports, this differentiation is included in the name. Central Place—The 2010 Census urban areas will no longer include one or more designated central places. In preceding censuses, the central place included all incorporated or census designated places included in the urban area title, plus additional incorporated areas that met a population size criterion. The concept of central place for urban areas no longer is being applied. Relationship to Other Geographic Entities—Geographic entities, such as metropolitan areas, counties, minor civil divisions, places, and census tracts, often contain both urban and rural territory, population, and housing units.

Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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URBAN GROWTH AREAS
Urban Growth Areas (UGAs) are legally defined entities in Oregon and Washington that the Census Bureau includes in the MAF/TIGER database in agreement with the states. UGAs, which are defined around incorporated places, are used to regulate urban growth. UGA boundaries, which need not follow visible features, are delineated cooperatively by state and local officials and then confirmed in state law. UGAs are a pilot project first defined only in Oregon for Census 2000. Each UGA is identified by a five-digit numeric census code, usually the same as the five-digit Federal Information Processing Series (FIPS) code associated with the incorporated place for which the UGA is named.

VOTING DISTRICTS
Voting Districts (VTDs) refer to the generic name for geographic entities, such as precincts, wards, and election districts, established by state governments for the purpose of conducting elections. States voluntarily participating in Phase 2 of the 2010 Census Redistricting Data Program provided the Census Bureau with boundaries, codes, and names for their VTDs. Each VTD is identified by a one-to-six-character alphanumeric census code that is unique within county. The code “ZZZZZZ” identifies a portion of counties (usually bodies of water) for which no VTDs were identified. For the 2010 Census, only Rhode Island did not participate in Phase 2 (the Voting District/Block Boundary Suggestion Project) of the 2010 Census Redistricting Data Program. Kentucky chose not to provide VTDs as part of their participation in Phase 2, and the states of Montana and Oregon provided VTDs for some counties. Therefore, for 2010 Census data products, no VTDs exist in select counties in Montana and Oregon or for the states of Rhode Island and Kentucky in their entirety. Participating states often submitted VTDs conforming to the feature network in the MAF/TIGER database rather than the complete legal boundary of the VTD. If requested by the participating state, the Census Bureau identified the VTDs that represent an actual voting district with an “A” in the voting district indicator field. Where a participating state indicated that the VTD has been modified to follow existing features, the VTD is a pseudo-VTD, and the voting district indicator contains “P .”

ZIP CODE TABULATION AREAS
ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs) are approximate area representations of U.S. Postal Service (USPS) five-digit ZIP Code service areas that the Census Bureau creates using whole blocks to present statistical data from censuses and surveys. The Census Bureau defines ZCTAs by allocating each block that contains addresses to a single ZCTA, usually to the ZCTA that reflects the most frequently occurring ZIP Code for the addresses within that tabulation block. Blocks that do not contain addresses but are completely surrounded by a single ZCTA (enclaves) are assigned to the surrounding ZCTA; those surrounded by multiple ZCTAs will be added to a single ZCTA based on limited buffering performed between multiple ZCTAs. The Census Bureau identifies five-digit ZCTAs using a five-character numeric code that represents the most frequently occurring USPS ZIP Code within that ZCTA, and this code may contain leading zeros. There are significant changes to the 2010 ZCTA delineation from that used in 2000. Coverage was extended to include the Island Areas for 2010 so that the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas have ZCTAs. Unlike 2000, when areas that could not be assigned to a ZCTA were given a generic code ending in “XX” (land area) or “HH” (water area), for 2010 there is no universal coverage by ZCTAs, and only legitimate five-digit areas are defined. The 2010 ZCTAs will better represent the actual Zip Code service areas because the Census Bureau initiated a process before creation of 2010 blocks to add block boundaries that split polygons with large numbers of addresses using different Zip Codes. Data users should not use ZCTAs to identify the official USPS ZIP Code for mail delivery. The USPS makes periodic changes to ZIP Codes to support more efficient mail delivery. The ZCTAs process used primarily residential addresses and was biased towards Zip Codes used for city-style mail delivery, thus there may be Zip Codes that are primarily nonresidential or boxes only that may not have a corresponding ZCTA.

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Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Figure A-1.

Standard Hierarchy of Census Geographic Entities

Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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Figure A-2.

Hierarchy of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Areas

Hierarchy of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Areas

American Indian Areas (Federal)/ Off-Reservation Trust Lands

States

Tribal Designated Statistical Areas

Tribal Census Tracts

Oklahoma Tribal Statistical Areas

Alaska Native Regional Corporations / Alaska Native Village Statistical Areas / Hawaiian Home Lands

American Indian Reservations (state) / State Designated Tribal Statistical Areas

Tribal Block Groups

Tribal Subdivisions

CENSUS BLOCKS

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Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

Figure A-3.

Census Regions, Census Divisions, and Their Constituent States
Northeast Region New England Division: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut Middle Atlantic Division: New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Midwest Region East North Central Division: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin West North Central Division: Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas South Region South Atlantic Division: Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida East South Central Division: Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi West South Central Division: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas West Region Mountain Division: Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada Pacific Division: Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, Hawaii

Geographic Terms and Concepts
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Demographic Profile Summary File

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