 Describe and Compare Correlational Studies and Experiments.

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[Countless correlation studies and] Countless experimental studies reveal that people learn and remember material best when they put it in their own words, rehearse it, and then rehearse and review again.

Describe and compare correlational studies and experiments.

Types of scientific methods used to describe predictions are correlation studies and experiments. A correlation study is used to look for relationships between variables. Types of correlation studies include observation ,surveys, and archival research. For example, in a predictive correlation study, you are looking for the degree of relationship between variables. If you think there is a correlation between class attendance and grades, you can look at the attendance records verses grades. If you notice that as attendance increases grades increase, that would be a positive correlation. If attendance goes up but grades go down, that would be a negative correlation. If there is no relationship between attendance and grades, there would be no correlation. Correctional studies are useful to make predictions as to cause and effect, but does not give any tangible reason for that relationship.
An experimental study looks at the effect of one or more variables on another variable. In other words, an experiment can look at the effect of one or more factors, known as independent variables, on another, the dependent variable. The goal of an experiment is to test a hypothesis, a prediction. In order to do this you alter the independent variable or variables and measure the effect of that manipulation on the dependent variable. There are many different types of experimental designs. Some types of experiments are controlled experiments, natural experiments, laboratory experiments, and field experiments. An example of a experiment would be if you predicted that subjects exposed to a noisy environment would cause an…...

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...[Countless correlation studies and] Countless experimental studies reveal that people learn and remember material best when they put it in their own words, rehearse it, and then rehearse and review again. Describe and compare correlational studies and experiments. Types of scientific methods used to describe predictions are correlation studies and experiments. A correlation study is used to look for relationships between variables. Types of correlation studies include observation ,surveys, and archival research. For example, in a predictive correlation study, you are looking for the degree of relationship between variables. If you think there is a correlation between class attendance and grades, you can look at the attendance records verses grades. If you notice that as attendance increases grades increase, that would be a positive correlation. If attendance goes up but grades go down, that would be a negative correlation. If there is no relationship between attendance and grades, there would be no correlation. Correctional studies are useful to make predictions as to cause and effect, but does not give any tangible reason for that relationship. An experimental study looks at the effect of one or more variables on another variable. In other words, an experiment can look at the effect of one or more factors, known as independent variables, on another, the dependent variable. The goal of an experiment is to test a hypothesis, a prediction. In order to do this you...

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