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Describe How the Human Skeleton Supports the Human Body

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Submitted By tingbam
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In your own words, describe how the human skeleton supports the human body.
The human skeleton is the framework of the human body. It supports the softer tissues, provides points of attachment for most skeletal muscles and protects many vital organs. It also maintains the body’s’ shape. The skeleton is made up of bones that can be categorised according to one of five functions that they perform;
• Shape and support; The skeleton provides the shape and support that gives the body its shape. As well as providing gravitational support, it supports the softer tissues and provides points of attachments for most skeletal muscle.
• Movement; Some bones provide leverage for movement. Most of the bones are connected to other bones at flexible joints, which allow the skeletal framework a high degree of flexibility and movement. The bones are attached to tendons of the skeletal muscle and the ligaments of the joints. They then act as levers and pulleys to aid the contraction of the skeletal muscles into movement.
• Protection; The skeleton provides protection for the body’s vital organs, reducing risk of injury to them.
Blood production; Red blood cells and some white blood cells are manufactured by the bone marrow which is found in the cavities of some of the larger bones. Haematopoiesis is the formation of blood cells. This normally takes place in the red marrow of the bones. Each bone consists of a compact outer shell and a spongy centre. The centre contains the bone marrow which produces blood cells.
In infants, red marrow is found inside the bone. As you age, the red marrow is mainly replaced by yellow marrow for fat storage. In adults, red marrow is restricted to the spongy bone in the skull, ribs, sternum, clavicles, vertebrae and pelvis. Red marrow functions in the formation of red blood cells, white blood cells and blood platelets.
• Storage of minerals; Bone...

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