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Diabetes Chronic Diseases

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Diabetes Chronic Diseases

A chronic disease such as diabetes disease is becoming the top killer of Americans. Diabetes is a main risk reason for heart attack and stroke. In addition, it is the second leading cause of blindness and kidney failure. While diabetes can be treated, it is better to avoid developing it in the first place by taking the preventions necessary. There are several types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes. “Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5% of all cases of diabetes and is characterized by a deficiency of the hormone insulin that regulates blood sugar level.” (Life Resource Center). However, in the far more common Type 2 diabetes, the level of insulin can be low, normal or high. In addition, Gestational Diabetes is built-up during the pregnancy stage; on the other hand, it is frequently fixed after the birth of the child.
A risk factor is something that influences your probability of getting a particular disease. There are several risk factors for the diabetes disease; there are some risk factors you can control and some you cannot control. Some of the risk factors that can be controlled are your current and future conduct. For example, some things you can do to control to avoid getting this disease are eating healthy, having an exercise routine and avoiding the use of drugs such as tobacco, alcohol and cigarettes. However, some you can't control include genetics, and environmental exposures or behaviors that occurred in the past. Risk factors are not absolute: it does not mean that if you have one or more risk factors you will unquestionably get diabetes, and also there is no guarantee that if you behave well and avoid risk factors you will be healthy. However, they definitely influence your chances of getting diabetes.
Even though my risk of developing diabetes is below average, there is constantly routine choices I...

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