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Douglass Rhetorical Analysis

In: English and Literature

Submitted By bvalenzuela
Words 1309
Pages 6
oBianca Valenzuela
Mrs. Cooper
A.P. Language
6 October 2015
Frederick Douglass Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, a memoir written by Fredrick Douglass is a book written to expose the immorality of slavery. He effectively uses persuasion and rhetorical devices to expose the immorality of slavery. Douglass makes the argument that even though a slave doesn’t have rights, they do have to potential to one day be free and successful. Irony, ethos, and pathos are rhetorical devices that Douglass effectively uses to support his argument and make a solid foundation. Ethos, Pathos, and Irony are all key devices that Douglass uses that compel his audience and teaches them the unfairness and immorality of slavery. Douglass uses irony in the way that we know what to expect when a slave is owned. Within the text he is clear to remind his audience that he is an “American Slave”. When he does this he is reminding us that slavery doesn’t just begin somewhere else. Slavery starts here in America and it happened here and sometimes people forget this. By using “American Slave” he is emphasizing the fact that he was also American like all the other slave owners, which makes it very ironic that they owe a fellow American because of his skin color. Also, in the book we are told that Captain Anthony could very well be the father of Frederick Douglass. If Captain Anthony was the father then this would make Andrew, Richard, and Lucritia is siblings. Andrew Richard, and Lucritia all get the chance to own Douglass after the Captain dies. This could also be seen as ironic because people who could be half siblings with Douglass now have the power to own him because of his skin color. And they aren’t aware of the fact that he may indeed be a half sibling. Douglass uses this to support his argument because he is showing that no matter what his skin color is he will never...

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