Free Essay

Dr. Martin's Office

In: Business and Management

Submitted By jdaianu0123
Words 1902
Pages 8
Dr. Martin’s Office

Seeking a Referral
The professor was not feeling well. In fact, on that Tuesday afternoon, he had felt tired and generally “down” physically. During the fifteen-minute drive home from work, he developed slight nausea and gastric discomfort. When he reached home he headed for the bathroom. For the next several hours, he experienced severe diarrhea and recurring waves of nausea and vomiting. After a few hours, the nausea had subsided somewhat, but the gastric distress persisted through most of what proved to be a long night.

On the following morning, the professor called the office of his primary care physician,
Dr. Martin. Dr. Martin’s nurse, Betty, came on the line. The professor detailed his physical problems of the previous night. “Betty, the nausea is pretty much gone, but the gastric discomfort is quite severe. I really feel that I need to see a doctor.” Betty replied,
“Dr. Martin is booked solid all day, so it would be hard to see him.”

“Betty,” the professor said, “I really feel that I need to see a doctor. Suppose I go to the HealthCheck Clinic. It’s close by, and I’ve always gotten good service there. Could the doctor refer me so that the University’s insurance would cover the visit?”

Betty’s voice took on a doubtful and clinical tone. “The doctor would not refer you to the clinic. However, I can ask him to prescribe something for the diarrhea. We’ll call your pharmacy and place the prescription.”

Slightly perturbed, the professor said, “But I don’t understand. My wife and I have always gotten good service at HealthCheck. Why can’t he refer me there?”

Betty’s clinical tone sharpened. “The doctor would not refer you to the clinic. The medicine should help you, though. I will call it in to the pharmacy.” It was obvious that it would do little good to continue the conversation, and as he was getting a little upset by the tone that Betty used, the professor said, “Thank you,” and hung up.
“Thanks for nothing,” he thought to himself.

Collecting Some Information
As the professor thought about the conversation, he got angrier. He did not like being told that he could not choose his own health provider, given that his primary care provider was not available. Besides, HealthCheck was much less expensive than the hospital emergency room. He decided to call the Employee Benefits Office at the University to get their views on the episode. His call was taken by Wendy, the Assistant Director of Staff Benefits.

The professor related the background of the situation to Wendy and described the results of the call to Dr. Martin’s office. Wendy expressed surprise that a doctor who was an approved primary provider with the University’s health plan would refuse to approve someone going to HealthCheck if the doctor could not see the patient. “If you can hold on a minute, I’ll ask Candy about it,” she said.

Candy was the Director of the Employee Benefits Office. After a minute Wendy came back on the phone. “Candy said she was surprised and distressed that Dr. Martin would not refer you to HealthCheck, especially since you requested this. The idea behind the recent changes in the University’s health care plan was to cut costs, and this action was certainly cheaper than the hospital’s emergency room. After all, the University’s plan is self-insured. The faculty and staff ultimately pay all the bills. Professor, Candy said that we could call the doctor’s office if you wanted us to.”

The professor replied, “No, that’s not necessary at this point. I can call them myself if I need to. I’ll go ahead and get the medicine that Martin prescribed and take it from there. If I need your help, I’ll call.” Wendy agreed, wished the professor well, and hung up.

The professor drove to the pharmacy that he used and picked up his medicine. The charge was just over U.S. $10. Returning home, he took a pill and went to bed. He did not go to work that day.

Trying Again
On Thursday, the professor felt somewhat better, and the diarrhea was more under control. However, the stomach discomfort continued to be a pronounced problem. He went to work that morning. By early afternoon, however, he gave up trying to work and went home. He then called Dr. Martin’s office. When Betty came on the phone, the professor explained his ongoing problem, which seemed to be getting worse. “Could the doctor see me this afternoon, Betty?” the professor asked.

“Dr. Martin is not in the office this afternoon,” Betty said. The professor expressed his disappointment. Then he repeated his earlier request to be examined by one of the other doctors in the office. Betty replied, “The doctor would not refer you to another doctor for this problem.” The professor replied, “But you told me yesterday that he was booked solid, and I couldn’t see him. Furthermore, he would not refer me to HealthCheck.”Betty responded, “We would have had to have you come in yesterday and wait until we could work you in to see him.”

The professor continued, “So you’re telling me that he is not in the office and can’t see me, yet he wouldn’t refer me to another doctor or to HealthCheck. Betty, I really feel that I need to see a doctor. What would he want me to do?”

“I believe he would want you to go to the emergency room,” Betty stated. The professor said in a stunned voice, “The emergency room? Why not HealthCheck? He’s on the staff of the hospital which owns HealthCheck.” “I don’t think he would want you to go there,” she replied.

The professor was angry, and stated that he found this suggestion to be decidedly unhelpful. “Thanks for your time,” he stated and hung up the telephone in disgust once again. Taking Action
“To heck with this,” the professor growled to himself. He stalked out of the house, got in his car, and drove the two miles to the HealthCheck clinic. Entering the facility, he explained to the receptionist the reason for his visit. She asked him to sit down in the lobby. Almost as quickly as he sat down, a nurse called him to enter the treatment area and led him to an examination room. “What seems to be the problem,” she asked as she took his blood pressure. The professor reviewed his experience of the last two days. “Dr. Martin is my primary care physician. When he couldn’t see me, he did not want to refer me to HealthCheck. I don’t understand that,” he said.

The attendant looked quite surprised. “I don’t understand that, either,” she agreed.
“You just lie down. Someone will be right in to look at you.”

Within two minutes, a nurse practitioner named Hilda entered the room. She briefly explained her role in the medical hierarchy. He had seen her before, and had no problem with having her conduct the exam. After looking at the professor’s chart, she used a stethoscope to listen to his stomach. “Oh my,” she exclaimed. “Your stomach is just gurgling.” She checked a few other visible symptoms before speaking again. Then she said, “I’m going to have the nurse take a blood sample to check for bacteria or viruses.” The professor asked, “Will you have to send the sample out?” “No,” Hilda replied. “We have the equipment right here.”

The nurse returned to the examination to draw blood. Then the professor was left alone for about 25 minutes. Hilda then returned with the nurse. “It’s a virus,” she proclaimed, shaking her head. “There’s nothing to do but wait it out, although it is likely close to running its course. I want to check for internal bleeding to be sure that’s not a problem, though.”

After checking him, Hilda told the professor that there was no sign of internal bleeding.
“I’m going to prescribe some medicine for you. I want you to go home and stay there for seventy-two hours. Do not go to work tomorrow; you’re contagious.”

The professor gratefully thanked Hilda and the nurse. He drove home and called his wife to ask her to stop by the pharmacy and pick up his medicine on her way home from work. She came home in about an hour, and the professor immediately took the recommended dosage. Within an hour there was noticeable improvement in his condition, and within two hours he felt almost normal. He slept well that night.

A Final Discussion with Betty
By late Friday morning, the professor felt fine. His stomach problems seemed to be a thing of the past. However, he was still wondering why Dr. Martin would not send him to HealthCheck. He called Dr. Martin’s office and asked to speak to Betty. When she came on the line, he told her that on the previous day he had decided to go to
HealthCheck rather than to the emergency room.

“The nurse practitioner on duty examined me and took a blood sample. She determined that the problem was viral in nature and prescribed medicine. The medicine did the trick, and my stomach feels much better this morning.” Betty said she was glad that he was feeling better.

The professor continued. “I’m still curious about one thing, however. Given the satisfactory treatment I received last night and the fact that the doctor is on staff at the hospital which owns HealthCheck, why was he so unwilling to refer me to that clinic?”
Betty replied, “The doctor just didn’t feel that you would get the best care there.” The professor asked, “Then I suppose he won’t refer me there so my insurance will pick up the bill?” Betty sounded skeptical. “I will ask him about it again, but I doubt he will approve it.”

Thanking her for her time, the professor hung up. Next he called Wendy in the Staff
Benefits Office at the University. He brought her up-to-date on his experience of the last couple of days. He then asked her for her thoughts on the situation.

“I’m really surprised that he wanted you to go to the emergency room,” she said.
“That is the kind of thing we hoped to avoid when we adopted the primary care plan. I would think Dr. Martin would know this since he is an approved provider. I’m sorry you had so much trouble, and I will tell Candy what happened.”

The professor thanked Wendy and hung up the phone. He reflected on the events that had transpired over the last few days with mixed emotions. It seemed that he had been caught between the University’s health care plan and Dr. Martin’s office and staff.
He wondered about the consistency between the goals of each of the parties in monitoring and protecting his health. He also wondered how much of the cost of his treatment would come out of his own pocket.

Discussion Questions
1. Who is the customer in this case?
2. Describe the supply chain of this health care delivery system. Also, identify the roles of the primary players.
3. Knowing who the customer is, and considering present customer service levels, what are the implications for supply chain redesign and for optimization of good customer service while keeping costs in check?
4. Discuss the ethical issues involved in the doctor’s refusal of referral to the HealthCheck clinic.

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Dr. Martin's Office

...------------------------------------------------- Dr. Martin's Office Intro It began with the professor feeling distressed from an “illness” and decided to call his primary care physician, Dr. Martin. He spoke with Betty, a nurse who told him the doctor was booked all day. For this reason, he sought a referral to the HealthCheck clinic which was covered under the university insurance. Despite the professor’s sickness, he was not referred to the clinic. Afterwards, the professor called the Employee Benefits Office and his case was relayed to Candy, the director, who shared the professor’s frustration. He took the medicine prescribed by Betty, with minimal results, so again he called Dr. Martin’s office and found he was out of office. Unsatisfied, the professor went to HealthCheck, where he was seen attended, diagnosed, prescribed medicine, and immediately felt better. For a last time he called Betty and told her of HealthCheck’s great service. Betty told him the doctor would not refer the professor there feeling the clinic did not have the best care. The professor then passed the information to the employee Benefits Office, with staff who shared the professor’s skepticism. Discussion Questions 1. Who is the customer in this case? In the given case there are internal and external customers. We have three service providers who are interdependent components of the health care system, first the health care office which behave as an insurance for their staff/professor,......

Words: 920 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Suppman

...Dr. Martin’s Office 1 Seeking a Referral The Professor was not feeling well. In fact, on that Tuesday afternoon, he felt tired and generally “down” physically. During the 15-minute drive home from work, he developed slight nausea and gastric discomfort. When he reached home he headed for the bathroom. For the next several hours, he experienced severe diarrhea and recurring waves of nausea and vomiting. After a few hours, the nausea had subsided somewhat, but the gastric distress persisted through most of what proved to be a long night. On the following morning, the Professor called the office of his primary care physician, Dr. Martin. Dr. Martin’s nurse, Betty, came on the line. The Professor detailed his physical problems of the previous night. “Betty, the nausea is pretty much gone, but the gastric discomfort is quite severe. I really feel that I need to see a doctor.” Betty replied, “Dr. Martin is booked solid all day, so it would be hard to see him.” “Betty,” the Professor said, “I really feel that I need to see a doctor. Suppose I go to the HealthCheck Clinic. It’s close by, and I’ve always gotten good service there. Could the doctor refer me so that the University’s insurance would cover the visit?” Betty’s voice took on a doubtful and clinical tone. “The doctor would not refer you to the clinic. However, I can ask him to prescribe something for the diarrhea. We’ll call your pharmacy and place the prescription.” Slightly perturbed, the Professor said,...

Words: 1939 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Logistics

...from an “illness” and decided to call his primary care physician, Dr. Martin. He spoke with Betty, a nurse who told him the doctor was booked all day. For this reason, he sought a referral to the HealthCheck clinic which was covered under the university insurance. Despite the professor’s sickness, he was not referred to the clinic. Afterwards, the professor called the Employee Benefits Office and his case was relayed to Candy, the director, who shared the professor’s frustration. He took the medicine prescribed by Betty, with minimal results, so again he called Dr. Martin’s office and found he was out of office. Unsatisfied, the professor went to HealthCheck, where he was seen attended, diagnosed, prescribed medicine, and immediately felt better. For a last time he called Betty and told her of HealthCheck’s great service. Betty told him the doctor would not refer the professor there feeling the clinic did not have the best care. The professor then passed the information to the employee Benefits Office, with staff who shared the professor’s skepticism. Discussion Questions 1. Who is the customer in this case? In the given case there are internal and external customers. We have three service providers who are interdependent components of the health care system, first the health care office which behave as an insurance for their staff/professor, the health providers, (hospitals, Healthcheck, Dr. Martin’s office) and at last the pharmacy. However, each entity is providing......

Words: 301 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Doctor Martin's Office

...vomiting. Eventually the nausea ceased but his stomach was still upset. The following day he called Dr. Martin, his primary health care physician. Betty, the doctor’s nurse assisted him over the phone and after the professor explained his condition she told him that Dr. Martin cannot see to him because of his packed schedule. The professor asked for a referral to go to the HealthCheck Clinic but the nurse declined claiming that Dr. Martin is not willing to send him there and was instead prescribed with medicine for the diarrhea. The prescription was placed in the pharmacy for the professor to pick up. Unsatisfied, the professor called up Candy, the director of the Employee Benefits Office, but Wendy picked up and relayed everything to Candy who then expressed her surprise and distress over the situation. She too did not understand that the request for a referral was denied as the professor asked for it. The professor picked up the medicine from the pharmacy, drove home, took a pill, and went to bed. The following day the diarrhea was under control but the gastric discomfort was still a problem. He decided to go to work but in the afternoon he gave up and went home. He called Dr. Martin’s office and once again Betty answered the phone. She informed him that the doctor is out all afternoon and still claimed that the doctor refuses to refer him to HealthCheck. Betty believed that Dr. Martin would want the professor to go to the emergency room. Beyond irritated, the professor......

Words: 1928 - Pages: 8

Free Essay

The Catbird Seat

...The Catbird Seat James Thurber Published in The New Yorker, Nov. 14, 1942 Mr. Martin bought the pack of Camels on Monday night in the most crowded cigar store on Broadway. It was theatre time and seven or eight men were buying cigarettes. The clerk didn't even glance at Mr. Martin, who put the pack in his overcoat pocket and went out. If any of the staff at F & S had seen him buy the cigarettes, they would have been astonished, for it was generally known that Mr. Martin did not smoke, and never had. No one saw him. It was just a week to the day since Mr. Martin had decided to rub out Mrs. Ulgine Barrows. The term "rub out" pleased him because it suggested nothing more than the correction of an error--in this case an error of Mr. Fitweiler. Mr. Martin had spent each night of the past week working out his plan and examining it. As he walked home now he went over it again. For the hundredth time he resented the element of imprecision, the margin of guesswork that entered into the business. The project as he had worked it out was casual and bold, the risks were considerable. Something might go wrong anywhere along the line. And therein lay the cunning of his scheme. No one would ever see in it the cautious, painstaking hand of Erwin Martin, head of the filing department at F & S, of whom Mr. Fitweiler had once said, "Man is fallible but Martin isn't." No one would see his hand, that is, unless it were caught in the act. Sitting in his apartment, drinking a......

Words: 3844 - Pages: 16

Premium Essay

Market Model Patterns of Change

...and support of global innovation and technologies, innovative financing, global innovation commons and heritable innovation knowledge in a breakthrough ways. The M-ICP founded by four Mongolian professionals and Ms. Nergui Dorj is a Founding Chief Executive Director. She is an economist, banking and finance specialist and development practitioner - graduate of Moscow Financial Academy, Australian National University and University of Wollongong, Australia. Ms. Nergui Dorj had been an active player in Mongolia’s transition from centrally planned to a market oriented economy and worked in senior positions of the Bank of Mongolia, the central bank, Institute of Finance and Economy, Economic Policy Support Project, DAI/USAID, Prime Minister’s Office of Mongolia, UNDP Mongolia and UNDP Samoa. She also...

Words: 970 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Individual: Influences of Visual Media Paper

...(c) Bedford/St. Martin's bedfordstmartins.com 1-457-62096-0 / 978-1-457-62096-6 SOUNDS AND IMAGES Movies and the Impact of Images 187 Early Technology and the Evolution of Movies 192 The Rise of the Hollywood Studio System 195 The Studio System’s Golden Age 205 The Transformation of the Studio System 209 The Economics of the Movie Business 215 Popular Movies and Democracy In every generation, a film is made that changes the movie industry. In 1941, that film was Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane. Welles produced, directed, wrote, and starred in the movie at age twenty-five, playing a newspaper magnate from a young man to old age. While the movie was not a commercial success initially (powerful newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, whose life was the inspiration for the movie, tried to suppress it), it was critically praised for its acting, story, and directing. Citizen Kane’s dramatic camera angles, striking film noir–style lighting, nonlinear storytelling, montages, and long deep-focus shots were considered technically innovative for the era. Over time, Citizen Kane became revered as a masterpiece, and in 1997 the American Film Institute named it the Greatest American Movie of All Time. “Citizen Kane is more than a great movie; it is a gathering of all the lessons of the emerging era of sound,” film critic Roger Ebert wrote.1 CHAPTER 6 ○ MOVIES 185 (c) Bedford/St. Martin's bedfordstmartins.com 1-457-62096-0 / 978-1-457-62096-6 MOVIES A generation later...

Words: 19373 - Pages: 78

Free Essay

Chaplains & Pluralism

...LIBERTY UNIVERSITY BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY Chaplains, the Constitution, and Pluralism Submitted to Dr. Paul B. Greer, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the completion of the course CHPL 500 – B03 Introduction to Chaplaincy by William K. Resor Jr. February 26, 2014 CHAPLAINS, THE CONSTITUTION, AND PLURALISM Introduction The foundation of chaplaincy can be traced as far back as biblical times. Dr. Steve Keith shares in his video that the Old Testament has examples of priests going into battle, marching alongside the soldiers, sounding the horns, and carrying the Ark of the Covenant. He mentions biblical heroes such as Aaron and Gideon as being forerunners to what we call chaplains today.[1] Bergen adds: "Certainly those interested in origins can find numerous biblical accounts of priests at war... Indeed, Old Testament militarism has been a problem for Christian exegesis from early on. Nevertheless, national chaplaincies invoke various examples of chaplain-like functions."[2] There is little doubt that chaplains, or their counterpart in ancient times, have been acting in one way or another with the military groups of their specific era. This paper will examine the history of chaplaincy from the periods of 27 AD to 1600 AD and find that the common principle among these priests of ancient times and chaplains along the spectrum of time is that they offer a glimpse of spiritual hope in situations that can be......

Words: 2492 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Tran Hong Nhung

...| |[pic] | FS3032 – Capital Markets MODULE HANDBOOK 2014/15 - Semester 1 Module Lecturer: Dr Phan Tran Trung Dzung Faculty of Banking and Finance / FTU fandzung@ftu.edu.vn This module is supported by Weblearn – students are advised to access the site on a regular basis, at least once a week FS3032 Capital Markets |Teaching Location |A1101 | |Teaching Semester |1 | |Module Level |H | |Home Academic Department |LMBS | |Module Leader |Dr Phan Tran Trung Dzung | |Module Web Site |FS3032C | |Teaching Mode |Day | |Module Title |Capital Markets | |Timeslot | | |Credit Rating For Module |15 ...

Words: 4773 - Pages: 20

Premium Essay

All About World War Ii

...All about World War II Brian Johnson 4201689 HIST102 D001 Dr. Reginald Jayne April 15, 2012 World War II was a part of the effect of World War I. According to World War 2 Info, “the origins of the Second World War are generally viewed as being traced back to the First World War.” (World War 2 2012) World War 2 happened between 1930s to the mid 1940s in Europe and Asia. In Europe, the war began on September 1, 1939 when the Nazi Germans led by Hitler invaded Poland. On September 2, 1945; the war ended with the relinquishing of Japan. In the early 1930s in Asia, World War 2 started in China and ended on May 8, 1945 with the surrender of Germany. World War II was the biggest armed disagreement in history involving most of the world and it involved using nuclear weapons to win (World War 2 2012) This war went from Europe to Asia and battles even occur in Africa and the Americas. They were also naval battles upon the waters. Within this war, there were millions of civilians that were killed by the Nazis and others. (World War 2 2012) Approximately fifty million people died as a result of World War II. Events Leading Up to World War II There were many events led to World War II. In Germany, on January 30, 1933; President von Hindenburg selected Adolf Hitler as Chancellor for Germany. (World War 2 History 2012) When the President died, Hitler assumed the office of President temporarily and all of its powers according to the Weimar Constitution. (World War 2 History......

Words: 1085 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Soho

...Peter McGovern British Literature Miriam Kroeker March 19, 2010 Soho Paper Soho has changed much throughout time from the Victorian time to modern days. It has had its problems such a cholera or racial issues, as well as social reform in the founding of its police force and the founding for China Town in 1985 by the Duke of Gloucester. It has also maintained a rich tradition in dining and drinking which has acquired its own rich history along the way. During the reign of Queen Victoria the population of England doubled due to Industrial Revolution witch also put new pressures on her society. This caused the crime rate to increase. Seeing the need to reform the police force of England, the Home Secretary Robert Pell developed what was a crude but partially effective police force. He formed ‘The Metropolitan Police Force’, and two men he put in charge of the force of 1000 men, were Charles Rown and Richard Mayne. All London’s police were the responsibility of one authority, under the direction of the Home Secretary, with headquarters at Scotland Yard. At the time their duty was not only crime prevention but inherited many of the watchmen’s duties, consisting of lighting lamps, calling out time, watching for fires, and providing other public services. “Bobbies or Peelers were not immediately popular. Most citizens viewed constables as an infringement on English social and political life, and people often jeered the police”(McDonnell). In much......

Words: 1301 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Reaganomics and Its Effect on Minority Groups

...over thirty years ago. This particular idea or theory is exceptionally contradictory and has been distorted by not only various media outlets but by subsequent pro-Reaganomics politicians over the years. A closer look at the actions taken place under Reagan’s administration will explicate Reagan’s administration detrimental effect on members of minority groups which, in some cases, still affects these groups today. These policies include but are not limited to the reduction of social programming, the impoverishment of black people, the “War on Drugs”, the administration’s response to crises such as AIDS, and its approach to Civil Rights and LGBT rights (or lack thereof). When former President Ronald Wilson Reagan was first elected into office in 1980, the country’s inflation rate was the highest it had been since 1947. After his election, President Reagan wasted no time in implementing his domestic policies for the economy. His economic policies were based on a school of thought called supply side economics. His economic plan included the following propositions: “reduce the growth of government spending, reduce marginal tax rates on income from labor and capital, and reduce regulation, and control the money supply to reduce inflation”. As a result, the administration afforded the American taxpayers the...

Words: 1535 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Old Germanic Alphabets

...CHAPTER 1 Summary Emma Woodhouse, Henry's younger daughter, lives in the small town of Highbury, sixteen miles away from London. She lives with her old, valetudinarian father at Hartfield. His elder daughter, Isabella, is married to the younger brother of George Knightley, the gentleman landlord and owner of Donwell Abbey Estate, a mile away from Hartfield. Isabella's husband is a lawyer; she lives with him and their five children in London. Emma lost her mother when she was five years old. Since then she has had the companionship of her governess, Miss Anne Taylor. After Isabella's marriage seven years earlier, Miss Taylor has been Emma's only companion and confidante. Emma is now twenty-one years old, beautiful and intelligent, but conceited and willful. Miss Taylor has just recently married Mr. Weston, a middle-aged widower. Even though she is very attached to her father, Emma feels depressed since she now has no companion except her this old, sickly man, who is against the thought of Emma marrying because he does not want to undergo any change. On the day following Miss Taylor's wedding, Mr. Woodhouse expresses his regrets over her marriage. Although he thinks Mr. Weston is a thorough gentleman, he disapproves of Miss Taylor desiring to marry in order to have a home of her own; Hartfield, where she has lived with the Woodhouses, is three times larger than Mr. Weston's Randalls. Emma tries to convince her father that their governess is happily married and tells......

Words: 16075 - Pages: 65

Premium Essay

Classroom Managaement

...Classroom management is one of the most essential skills to becoming an effective classroom teacher. Teachers who possess the ability to manage their classrooms are able to create an environment where learning is the focus (Burden, 2004). There are many theories on how to become positive and encouraging classroom managers. While all of these theories are different and emphasize different aspects of discipline and behavior, all have proven to be valuable methods for improving management in the classroom. One theory of classroom management is Assertive Discipline. This was developed by Lee Canter and Associates (1976). This approach demonstrates how teachers can assertively communicate their expectations to students. It is a comprehensive, systematic method of classroom management. It was developed on the basis of four concepts: “(a) behavior is a choice, (b) every student has a right to learn in an environment that is free from disruption, (c) every teacher has the right to teach without disruption from students, and (d) no child should engage in behavior that is not in the child's best interest.” (Canter & Canter, 1976) These guidelines are expressed and supported by a discipline plan. The discipline plan includes positive and negative consequences for behavior in the classroom. Teachers will assert the rules and enforce them with progressive consequences during the day. One important element is that in most cases, the slate is clean each day. Students begin each day on the...

Words: 1807 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Ermodeling

...Entity-Relationship Diagrams Georgia State University--CIS 850/330 Entity Relationship Modeling Entity-Relationship Diagrams Contents: Data Modeling User Views Entities/ Entity Sets Attributes Entity-Relationship Diagrams (ERDs) Finding Entities and Relationships English Grammar Rules Registration Example Student Registration Course Enrollment Grade Report Relationship Attributes Extended ERD Note: The Entity-Relationship Diagrams presented in this class are based on James Martin’s Information Enginnering approach. Georgia State University--CIS 850/330 Entity Relationship Modeling 1 Design Approach User View Collection of Tables 2. Normalize these relations Steps: 1. Model User View Collection of BCNF Tables 3. Represent all keys Collection of BCNF Tables with Keys Represented New Cumulative Design Old Cumulative Design Georgia State University--CIS 850/330 Entity Relationship Modeling 4. Merge the result of the previous steps into the cumulative design. Model User View Advantages of Data Modeling: + Data Analysis vs. Process Analysis + Graphical Models vs. Prose + “Data is more stable than processes.” Georgia State University--CIS 850/330 Entity Relationship Modeling 2 User Views A user view is the view of the data that is necessary to support the operations of a particular user. Example: Wells Junior College User View #1 -- Registration User View #2 -- Class Enrollment User View #2 -- Grade Reporting Georgia State......

Words: 1334 - Pages: 6