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Dried Leaves as Charcoal

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Master List of Investigatory Project 01 Investigatory projects I. Pyrolisis of plastic wastes materials for the production of plywood substitute II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Marang (Artocarpus ordorotissimus) peelings as hardiflex – like Ethyl alcohol from ripe banana peelings Rat killer extract from tuble roots Fuel briquettes from dried banana leaves and waste papers Coconut sheath substitute of abaca fiber Commercial glue from Talisay resin Butter derive from marang (Artocarpus odoratissima) seed Marang seeds as alternative source for commercial flour

02 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. Compendium of investigatory studies Basic geological concepts Maps and compass Rocks and fire Fungus Puccinia graminis as mycoherbicide

03 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Sea cucumber (Cucumaria miniamata) as a potential source of leather Fiberglass from Apitong sap (Dipterocarpus grandiflorus) Rat killer extract from tuble roots Tetrodotoxin from bile of puffer (Sphoeroides maculates) as a potential source of stem borer pesticide V. VI. VII. VIII. Glue out of cigarette filer and acetone Roof sealant out of Styrofoam and gasoline Radical pesticide from garongin Chaetomorpha aerea a potential source of biogas

04 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Sawdust as an alternative source for corkboard Woodcraft from banana peduncle Lumber from carabao manure Herbal leaves produced herbal ointment The wonder of Cobong plant Cyperus Esculenta Cassaw-dustenta as decorative Newsaw – Casco as Décor The potential of black plastic bag as heat enhancer for guso solar dryer

05 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Dalupang (Urena lobata) as potential source of commercial fibers Styrofoam and powdered oyster shells as tiles Strong fiber to replace abaca Banana peduncles (Musa paradisiacal) as a potential source of packaging papers V. Methane outputs of vegetable refuse: Banana peelings (Musa sapientum), corn peelings (Zea mays), and Chinese pechay (B. rapapekinensis): A comparative study VI. VII. VIII. IX. Custom – built solar oven The effect of eutrophication on the growth of tilapia Sunflower (Helianthus annus) extract as a liquid indicator The absorbent property of water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) in effective removal of lead and mercury from waste water X. XI. Hanga nut extract as kerosene substitute a viable source of fuel Production of germicidal soap from malunggay (Moringa oliefera) roots extract and its comparison with leading brand of soap XII. Preliminary investigation on the utilization of coconut “sepal” as medium for column chromatography XIII. XIV. Discarded plastics: A low cost tile Pectin model from peels and pulps

06 Investigatory projects I. Preparation of ointment from hanga nut (Pittosporum resiniferum) extract as muscle pain reliever II. Annona squamosa seed extract: A potential dog soap ingredient for the eradication of ticks and fleas

07 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Coconut fiber reinforced compressed earth blocks Banana peduncle (Musa paradisiacal) as potential source of board Flour from corn kernels (Zea maize) Antibacterial properties of Caulerpa racemosa (Forsskal) J Agardh from Taluksangay, ZC V. VI. VII. Dicoalsolwas hollow blocks Water heater stove Costless energy from wastes

08 Investigatory projects I. The insecticidal potential of Nicotiana tabacum leaves & Chrysanthemus indicum flowers extracts against cockroaches II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Tobalic: A household insecticide American toad (Bufo americanus) skin as leather substitute Lanzones seeds (lansium domesticum correa) as rodenticide Strong fiber to replace abaca Discarded Manganese Dioxide as shoe polish Fuel Briquettes from Biodegradable Waste Tiles Made of Plastic Waste Mosquito coil made from santol stalks (Sandoricom indicum) & lanzones peelings (Lansium domesticum) X. XI. XII. Relationship between mangrove plants and tilapia (Tilapia sp.) Water color from extract of leaves and flowers Lethal effects of rice straw ash on golden snails

09 Investigatory projects I. II. III. Ampullaria culprinas as a component in making bricks Pulverized coral fragment as decorative household receptacles Utilization of Lanzium domesticum peelings and dissolved Styrofoam as a particle board substitute IV. V. VI. Cassaw-dustenta as decorative Cyperus esculenta Bracket fungus (Meripilus giganteus) as charcoal for fuel and coloring implement VII. VIII. Turmeric (Curcuma domestics) rhizome extract as liquid indicator Canistel (Pouteria campechiana) as fabric dye

10 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. The Department of Science and Technology On Line Retrieval System Promotion on nursery enterprise for asexually propagated mango Compendium of investigatory studies The feasibility of Heliconia (Saging-saging) as source of fiber Extracting fiber from espada leaves The feasibility of hedychium coronarium as a paper market ink Glue from cigarette filters Utilization of cemetery soils as an alternative for commercial fertilizer. Anu – nut ahell as luanet like Tiles from discarded plastic wares and cellophanes Sawdust made into hollow blocks and flower pots Ash made into flower pots and pen holder The feasibility of banana bracket extract as an acid – base indicator The feasibility study of coconut husk ash and sand as components in bricks making XV. XVI. PTKT liquid for common garden pests Waste paper materials and animals manure as excellent soil conditioner and fertilizer XVII. Bricks from rice hull ash and dried grass XVIII. Panel board from coconut husk bonder with synthetic material

XIX.

Recycled products from discarded cellophanes, Styrofoam and empty plastic dextrose bottles

XX. XXI.

Solar energy delivery system for indoor use Bisol as a source of ethyl alcohol

XXII. Pain relievr out of spices, oil and kerosene XXIII. Products produced from durian seeds (Durio zibethinus) XXIV. Pomelo derivatives XXV. Akapulco ointment XXVI. Water resistance of coconut husk pot bonded with cassava starch XXVII. Cardava banana rhizomes for food income and economy XXVIII. A survey on the causes of carcass condemnation in hogs slaughtered

at the City Abottoir, San Roque, Zamboanga City XXIX. Artificial reef from calcium hydroxide waste (CA(OH)2 XXX. Musa paradisiacal peelings desserts XXXI. Powder dye from coconut lumber sawdust XXXII. Proper liquid wastes management through filtration process XXXIII. XXXIV. Punal de godo: A home grown source of HEMP Styro paste

XXXV. Thermal insulation XXXVI. XXXVII. Water magnifier Cibugarvi: A household insecticide

XXXVIII. Anamirta cocculus (Lagtang) for insecticide and pesticide XXXIX. XL. XLI. The userfulness of discarded glass

Flour from corn kernels (Zea maize) Eggshell as facial powder

11 Investigatory projects I. II. III. Coir effect on earth block from mine waste Color powder extracted from papaya leaves The gonad index and fecundity of some species of rabbitfish (Family siganidae) IV. V. VI. The utilization of coconut “sepal” as medium for column chromatography Discharged plastics: A low cost tile Smart SIM alternative for microbial culture

VII. VIII. IX. X.

Pectin model from peels and pulps Puffer vine skin as a potential substitute of leather Used camera film as wood varnish Jackfruit waste as potential source of packaging paper and particle board

12 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. Sea cucumber (Cucumaparia minamata) as a potential source of leather Ipil – ipil butter from ipil – ipil Linger lily (iba) extract alternative sources for commercial stain remover Biological chalk from grind seashell Coconut filling burger (entry for division fair) Madre de cacao (Chryricidia speium) extract as golden snail molluscide Ilang – ilang flower an alternative source of soap Lanzones seeds (lansium domesticum Correa) as rodenticide

13 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. Feasibility of discarded clamshell as aggregate in bricks making Saw dust made into hollow blocks and flower pots Ash made into flower pots Acoustic board from cassava pith Eggshell as soil neutralizer Fibers from gabi (dioscorea alata) stalks Mathematical card game Shoes polisher out of charcoal and wax Gracinia mangostana rind charcoal Proper liquid wastes management through filtration process Fungus puccinia graminis as mycoherbicide Utilization of cemetery soil as an alternative for commercial fertilizer

14 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. The utilization of coconut sepal as medium for column chromatography Smart SIM alternative for microbial culture Jackfruit wastes as potential source of packaging paper and particle board Production of powdered skim milk from cauliflower

V. VI. VII.

Pectin model from peels and pulps Used camera films as wood varnish Puffer vine skin as a potential substitute of leather

15 Investigatory projects I. Organic fertilizer from the decomposition of banana peeling by cellulose producing bacteria in soil II. III. IV. V. VI. The miracle of charcoal as a pocket saver Testing of MSF feeds as food for crab culture Lagundi (Vitex negundo) leaves extract as mosquitoes killer Multiple products from guyabano pulp Utilization of discarded thermoplastic as asphalt additive in road construction VII. VIII. Acoustic board from cassava pith The feasibility of banana leaves as a substitute for the production of pin boards IX. X. Pahuli tea: a muscle and body pain reliever The potential of coconut coir as component mixture for sturdy hollow blocks XI. XII. XIII. Betel nut tannin as an adhesive Commercial fibers from mansanita bark Costless energy from waste

16 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. The feasibility of hedychium coronarium as a paper marker ink Extracting fibers from espada leaves Glue from cigarette filters Utilization of cemetery soil as an alternative for commercial fertilizers Ash made into flower pots and pen holders Balobo source of energy Gracinia mangostana rind charcoal Anu-nut shell as luanet like (peanut shell) Solar energy delivery system for indoor use Pain reliever out of spices, oil and kerosene

XI. XII. XIII. XIV.

The feasibility of crotnon tiglium Linn seeds (tuba-tuba seeds) as pesticide Products produced from durian seeds Akapulco ointment Water resistance of coconut husk pot bonded with cassava starch

17 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. The effectiveness of charpay as recycled fuel Versatility of uray plants Portland cement concrete Dicoalsolwas hollow blocks Application of ocean thermal energy conversion in the Philippines Bricks from rice hull ash and dried grass Hedychium coronarium (camias) flower extract a feasible market ink Botones toothache drops Promotion on science technology awareness through information and advocacy X. XI. XII. Momordica charanta extract as orchid vase – life extender Styroco board Community diagnosis

18 Investigatory projects I. Absorption property of corn silk in suspended solid from simulated wastewater II. III. Handmade paper from corn (Zea mays) husks Indian pennywort (Centella Asiantica) as a potential source of ointment for hematoma IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Lumber from carabao manure The potential of black plastic bag as heat enhancer for guso solar dryer Herbal leaves produced herbal ointment Woodcraft from banana peduncle Lead removal through bioabsorption by means of Eucheuma cottonii Eggshells as an effective component in making tiles

19 Investigatory projects I. II. Rat killer from tuble roots Multiple uses of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) latex as a potential source of glue III. IV. V. Aflatoxin as a source of pesticide for aphids Ethyl alcohol from cogon roots (Imperata cylindrica) Comparative study of the seaweeds (Eucheuma species)grown along Pagadian costal area VI. A study of antimicrobial and insecticidal properties of the rhizophoraceae

20 Investigatory projects I. II. Production of ink from mahogany pods charcoal Surgical thread from agar – agar (Eucheuma cottonii)

21 Investigatory projects I. The gonad index and fecundity of some species of rabbitfish sold in the Balonating public market II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. Guso solar dryer Coir effect on earth block from mine waste Utilization of turmeric rhizomes as a fabric dye Styrofoam and fragmentary corals as a component for making bricks The effects of acid rain on the growth of pechay An antimicrobial ointment manufactured from kamantigue leaves extractive Color powde extracted from papaya leaves Green algae as a potential source of fuel Palay hull ash as component in making tiles

22 Investigatory projects I. II. The potential products from U.F (Used Films) The utilization of crab shell chitin as an alternative material filtering metallic ions III. Utilizing solar energy as a source of powder for a toy car

23 Investigatory projects I. Production of biodegradable food wrapper from sweet potato (Ipomea batatas) vines and tubers II. III. Extraction of cellulose from NIPA leaves as a substitute for film acetate Lead removal from assimilated soils through phytoextraction via cucumber

24 Investigation projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. Alim pith for pin board and insulator Lethal effects of rice straw ash on golden snails The shining glory effects of nipa kernel (Nypa fruticans) Tobalic: A household insecticide Tiles made of plastic waste American toad (Bufor americanus) skin as leather substitute Discarded manganese dioxide as shoe polish The insecticidal potential of nicotiana tabacum leaves Chrysanthemus indicum flowers extracts against cockroaches IX. X. Relationship between mangrove plants and tilapia (tilapia sp.) Water color from extract of leaves and flowers

25 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Pyrolysis of plastic wastes for the production of window blades Community diagnosis Botones toothache drops Utilization of sedimentary rocks (Shale) as chalk Waste management Technology needs assessment in Zamboanga City The preparation of insecticide using lantana extract Mayana leaves and coconut female flowers as a source of dye Coconut oil

26 Investigatory projects I. II. Fiberglass from apitong sap (Diterocarpus grandiflorus) Comparative study of the seaweeds (Eucheuma species) grown along Pagadian Coastal areas III. IV. V. VI. VII. Ethyl alcohol from cogon grass (Imperata cylindrical) Aflatoxin as a source of pesticide for aphids Rat killer from tuble roots Glue out of cigarette filter and acetone Cloth dye out of bougainvillea flower

27 Investigatory projects I. II. The magnificent effect of mahogany seeds extract against termites Types of water affect the percentage of the decomposition of dried monocot and dicot leaves III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. Testing of MSF feeds as food supplement for crab fattening Multiple products from guyabano pulp Betel nut tannin as an adhesive Green algae as water salinity control Pahauli tea: A muscle and body pain reliever The potential of coconut coir as component mixture for sturdy hollow blocks IX. Organic fertilizer from the decomposition of banana peelings by cellulose producing bacteria in soil X. XI. XII. Tapping the potentials of pengka-pengka fruits Commercial fibers from mansanitas bark Costless energy from wastes

28 Investigatory projects I. II. III. Pulverized coral fragments as curative household receptacles Ampollaria culprinas as a component in making bricks Utilization of lanzium domesticum peelings and dissolved Styrofoam as a particle board substitute IV. V. Handmade paper from corn (Zea mays) husks Acacia (Acacia sp.) leaves as effective filters for vehicle exhausts

VI. VII.

Acacia (acacia sp.) leaves as effective filters for vehicle exhausts Eggshell as an effective component in making tiles

29 Investigatory projects I. II. Turmeric (Curcuma domestica) rhizome extract as liquid indicators Bracket fungus (Meripilus giganteus) as charcoal for fuel and coloring implement III. Cahistel (Pouteria campechiana) as fabric dry

30 Investigatory projects I. II. III. The utilization of Musa paradisiaca sap as a culture media ingredient Utilization of Musa paradisiaca stalk fibers for cement bonded board Extraction and utilization of crude dyes from kamanchile (Pithecellobium dulce) bark as colorant for handmade paper IV. A survey on the causes of carcass condemnation on hogs slaughtered at the City Abattoir San Roque, ZC V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. Mayana leaves and coconut female flowers as sources of dye Pyrolisis of plastic wastes for the production of window blades The usefulness of discarded glass Kuhol meat as feeds for Talakito grow-out in floating cages Rice grain craft ash made into bricks Ano-hupa (Anonang hulls of palay

31 Investigatory projects I. Tetrodotoxin from bile of puffer (Sphoeroides maculatusf) as a potential source of stem borer pesticide II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Glue out of cigarette filter and acetone Cloth dye out of bougainvillea flower Roof sealant out of Styrofoam and gasoline Chaetomorpha aerea a potential source of biogas Radical pesticide from garongin Lanzones seeds (Lansium domesticum correa) as rodenticide

32 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Surface sensitive analysis of thin oxide films on semiconductors Runge – kutta method and uniformly regular matrices Biosafety guidelines implementing executive order No. 430 The use of mindanao’s land resources and environment Country report: Philippines status of RVNRL projects Manpower development for Mindanao industries The feasibility of using ipil-ipil seed as an alternative to guar gum Strategies to delay senescence in perishable crops A study of the electro transfer reaction of bis – (n,N’ Dibenzyl-Thiourea) dichlorobalt (II) and bis – (N,N’ dibenzyl thiourea) dibromocobalt (II) in non aquaeous solutions with hexacyanoferrate (III) X. XI. Radiation vulcanization of the Philippine natural rubber latex Company profile

33 Investigatory projects I. Utilization of Musa paradisiacal (Plantain banana) stalk fiber for cement blonde board II. III. IV. Eggshell as facial powder Generalized synthetic division Administrative report (On-going project) period covered 2nd and 3rd quarter (January-June 1999) V. Momordica charantia extract as orchid vase – life extender

34 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. Woodcraft from banana peduncle Lumber from carabao manure The potential of black plastic bag as heat enhancer for guso solar dryer Sawdust as an alternative source for corkboard Utilization of lanzuim domesticum peeling and dissolved Styrofoam as a particle board substitute VI. Pulverized coral fragments as decorative household receptacles

35 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Kuhol meat as feeds for talakitok grown out in floating cages The effect on the shape of the containers on the ripening of banana fruits Polystyrene coated as a substitute for packaging materials Specialized leaves of bougainvillea as paper and liquid indicator The feasibility of coco nucifera oil as an additive in candle making Extraction of oil soluble colorant from achuete seed using different media Durability tests of the particle board made from rice hull and foam polystyrene gasoline mixture VIII. IX. X. Rice grain chaft ash made into bricks Ano – hupa (Anonang hulls of palay Lima – lima tubers as fuel

36 Investigatory projects I. Types of water affect the percentage of decomposition of dried monocot and dicot leaves II. III. IV. V. The miracle of charcoal as a pocket saver Lagundi (Vitex negundo, L.) leaves extract as mosquito killer Testing of MSF feeds as food supplement for crab fattening Utilization of discarded thermoplastic as asphalt additive in road construction VI. VII. VIII. Acoustic board from cassava pith Avocado leaves as rodenticide The feasibility of banana leaves as a substitute for the production of pin boards IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. Testing of MSF feeds as food supplement for crab culture Tapping the potentials of pengka-pengka fruits Green algae as water salinity control Pahauli tea: A muscle and body pain reliever The potential of coconut coir as component mixture for sturdy hollow blocks XIV. XV. Tawa-tawa for sore eyes hypertension and fever Coal solid wastes bricks as an investigatory project

37 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. Analysis of lye content from fronds ash of (Palmae) palm trees Proper liquid wastes management through filtration process Coconut fiber reinforced compressed earth blocks Pomelo derivatives Ash made into flower pots and pen holder Durability tests of particle board made from rice hull and foam polystyrene gasoline mixture VII. VIII. IX. Ano – hupa (Anonang, hull of palay) Rice grain chaff ash made into bricks Coal solid wastes bricks as an Investigatory project

38 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. Baluster –decorative arts manufacture locally generates family income Baluster – decorative art manufacture locally generates family income Baluster – decorative arts manufacture locally generates family income Built in battery charger Cardava banana rhizome for food income and economy Recycled products from discarded cellophanes, Styrofoam and empty plastic dextrose bottle VII. Versatility of uray plants (Amaranthus spinosus)

39 Investigatory projects I. Tetrodotoxin from bile of puffer (Sphoeroides maculates) as a potential source of stem borer pesticide II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Roof sealant out of Styrofoam and gasoline Cheatomorpha aerea a potential source of biogas Radical pesticide from garongin Glue out of cigarette filter and acetone Cloth dye out of bougainvillea flower Rat killer from tuble roots

40 Investigatory projects I. Tetrodotoxin from bile of puffer (Sphoeroides maculates) as a potential source of stem borer pesticide II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Radical pesticide from garongin Chaetomorpha aerea a potential source of biogas Roof sea: Amt out of Styrofoam and gasoline Fiberglass from apitong sap (Dipterocarpus grandiflorus) Ink from mangostene peeling Lanzones seeds (Lansium domesticum correa) as rodenticide

41 Investigatory projects I. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in tamban herring fish oil extract and its effect on the physiological ability of albino mice II. Lead removal from assimilated soils through phytoextraction via cucumber

42 Investigatory projects I. Production of biodegradable food wrapper from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) vines and tubers II. Production of biodegradable food wrapper from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) vines and tubers III. IV. V. VI. Lead removal from assimilated soils through phytoextraction via cucumber Lead removal from assimilated soils through phytoextraction via cucumber Extraction of cellulose from nipa leaves as a substitute for film acetate Extraction of cellulose from nipa leaves as a substitute for film acetate

43 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Pyrolisis of plastic waste for the production of window blades Lagundi (Vitex negundo L.) leaves extract as mosquito killer Technology need assessment in Zamboanga City (Concept paper) Towards a long range plan for energy development in the province of Palawan V. VI. VII. Promotion of nursery enterprise for asexually propagated mangoes Styro paste Pain reliever out of spices oil and kerosene

VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII.

Status of coral reef in some of the coastal waters of Misamis Occidental Overview of the seaweed industry A community diagnosis of barangay B Lost cost high power wind mills and turbines Durian as distinctive Asian fruit Wood ash made into flower pots and pen holders

44 Investigatory projects I. II. Comparative analysis prefabricated concrete slabs from hollow blocks Design and development of an improvised poultry incubator

45 Investigatory projects I. II. Amppullaria cultrinas as a component in making bricks Adsorption property of corn silk in suspended solids from simulated wastewater III. IV. V. VI. VII. Sea cucumber (Cucucmaria miniamata) as a potential source of leather Coconut filling burger (entry for division fair) Madre de cacao (Chryricida sepium) extract as golden snail molluscide Handmade paper from corn (Zea mays) husks Eggshells as an effective component in making tiles

46 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. Dalupang as potential source of commercial fiber Styrofoam and powder oyster shells as tiles Strong fiber to replace abaca Banana peduncles as a potential source of packaging paper Methane outputs of vegetables refuse; banana peelings, corn peelings, and Chinese pechay VI. VII. VIII. IX. Custom built solar oven The effects of eutrophication on the growth of tilapia Sunflower: extract as a liquid indicator The absorbent property of water hyacinths in effective removal of lead and mercury from wastewater X. Hanga nut extract as kerosene substitute: A viable source

XI. XII. XIII. XIV.

Production of germicidal soap from malunggay roots The utilization of coconut sepal as medium for column chromatography Discarded plastics: A low cost tiles Pectin model from peels and pulps

47 Investigatory projects I. Utilization of alocala macrorrhiza (Elephant ears) extract as anti-bacterial agent against Staphylococcus aureaus II. Rice – helminthosporium solani liquid mixture as agent in poultry farm odor control and elimination III. Production of biodegradable food wrapper from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) vines and tubles IV. The potential products from UF (Used Film)

48 Investigatory projects I. II. III. Red gumamela flowers (Hibiscus) as potential source of cooking oil A study of anti-microbial and insecticidal properties of the rhizophoraceae Preparation of sawdust green algae mixture as a substitute for commercial sold fertilizer IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. Picture frame from banana peeling Ginger lily (Iba) extract alternative sources for commercial stain remover Adhesive glue from camansi trunk Ilang – ilang flower as alternative source of soap Vinegar from pineapple peelings Coconut filling burger (entry for division fair) Madre de cacao (Chryricicia sepium) extract as golden snail molluscide

49 Investigatory projects I. The utilization of banana (Musa paradisiacal) sap as compared to water in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) cultivation II. III. IV. V. Compendium of investigatory studies Feasibility of Helicoña (Saging saging) a source of fiber Extracting fiber from espada leaves The feasibility of hydichium coronarium as a paper mark ink

VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII.

Glue from cigarette filters Utilization of cemetery soil as an alternative for commercial fertilizer Anu nut as luanet like Tiles from discarded plastic wares and cellophanes Sawdust made into flower pots and pen holder Ash made into flower pots and pen holder The feasibility of banana bract extract as an acid base indicator The feasibility study on coconut husk as an sand and components in bricks making

XIV. XV.

PTKT liquid for common garden pest Waste paper materials and animal manure as excellent soil conditioner and fertilizer

XVI.

Bricks from rice hull ash and dried grass

XVII. Panel board from coconut husk bonded with synthetic materials XVIII. Recycle products discarded cellophanes, Styrofoam and empty plastic dextrose bottles XIX. XX. XXI. Solar energy delivery system for indoor use Bisol as a source of ethyl alcohol Pain reliever out of spices, oil and kerosene

XXII. Products produced from durian seeds XXIII. Pomelo derivatives XXIV. Akapilco ointment XXV. Water resistance of coconut husk pot bonded with cassava starch XXVI. Cardava banana rhizome for food income and economy XXVII. A survey on the causes of carcass condemnation on hogs slaughtered at the City Abattoir, San Roque ZC XXVIII. Artificial reef from calcium hydroxide waste

XXIX. Musa paradisiacal peelings desserts XXX. Powder dye from coconut lumber sawdust XXXI. Proper liquid waste management through filtration process XXXII. Punal de godo: A home grow source of HEMP XXXIII. XXXIV. Styro paste Thermal insulation

XXXV. Water magnifier

XXXVI. XXXVII.

Cibugarvi: A household Anamirta cocculus (Lagtang) for insecticide and pesticide

XXXVIII. Cancer pagurus as lead and copper adsorbers

50 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. Pyrolisis of plastic waste material for the plywood substitute Regenerating Bambusa blumena through branch cuttings Commercial glue from Talisay resin Rat killer extract from tuble roots Butter derive from marang (Artocarpus odoratissima) seed Aloe vera and calamansi’s skin a potential of hair styling gel alternative to commercial one VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. Ethyl alcohol from ripe banana peelings Fuel briquettes from dried banana leaves and waste papers Coconut sheath substitute of abaca fiber Marang seeds as alternative source for commercial flour Coconut embryo (Cocos nucifera) as potential feed supplement for tilapia (tilapia sp.)

51 Investigatory projects I. A study of the anti-microbial and insecticidal properties of the rhizophoraceae II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. Ink from mangostene peeling Picture frame from banana peeling Ipil – ipil butter from ipil ipil Ginger lily (Iba) extract alternative sources for commercial stain remover Adhesive glue from camansi trunk Ilang ilang flower an laternative source of soap Vinegar from pineapple peelings Biological chalk from grind seashells Coconut filling burger (entry for division fair) Madre de cacao (Chryricidia sepium) extract as golden snail molluscide Preparation of sawdust green algae mixture as a substitute for commercial sold fertilizer

52 Investigatory projects I. II. III. Sawdust as an alternative source for corkboard NEWSAW-CASCO as décor Absorption property of corn silk in suspended solids from simulated wastewater IV. V. Canistel (Pouteria campechiana) as fabric dye Bracket fungus (Meripilus giganteus) as charcoal for fuel and coloring implement VI. VII. Lanzones seeds (Lansium domesticum Correa) as rodenticide Turmeric (Cucuma domestica) rhizome extract as liquid indicator

53 Investigatory projects I. II. Lima – lima tubers as fuel Durability tests of particle board made from rice hull foam poly styrene gasoline mixture III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. The growth and development of pechay in soiless culture medium The preparation of insecticide using lantana extract Tapping the potentials of penka-penka fruits Coal solid wastes bricks as an investigatory project Lima – lima tubers as fuel Commercial fibers from mansanita bark Costless energy from wastes

54 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. Kuhol meat as feeds for talakito gow out in floating cages The magnetic efficient of mahogany seeds extract against termites Fibers of the millennium from kanganan tree Fibers from gabi (dioscorea alata) stalk Mayana leaves and coconut female flowers as sources of dye Polystyrene coated paper as substitute for packaging materials Electromagnetic field: Cyanobacteria alage cell multiplier Instant soup from malunggay leaves Utilization of discarded thermoplastics as a tile substitute Utilization of cemetery soil as an alternative for commercial fertilizer

55 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. BAKHAWAKAN Acquisition of rice mechanical dryer Suarbemco mini coco oil mill Coastal village model project on seaweed production and processing Pineapple technology development project Tobaliss liquid golden kuhol killer The impact of DOST summer science institute for grade V elementary science NB teachers on pupils achievement in science in the division on Zamboanga Del Sur VIII. Commercial fibers from mansanita bark

56 Investigatory projects I. Rice helminthosporium solani liquid mixture as agent in poultry farm odor control and elimination II. Clay with sand: A potential source of adobe (Sun dried bricks)

57 Investigatory projects I. The feasibility study of coconut husk ash and sand as component in bricks making II. The feasibility study of coconut husk ash and sand as component in bricks making III. The feasibility study of coconut husk ash and sand as component in bricks making IV. V. VI. Extracting fibers from espada leaves an investigatory projects Mayana leaves and coconut female flowers as sources of dye The feasibility of using banana peelings for papermaking

58 Investigatory projects I. The gonad index and fecundity of some species of rabbitfish sold in the balonating public market II. III. IV. Guso solar dryer Coir effect on earth block from mine waste Utilization of turmeric rhizomes as a fabric dye

V. VI. VII.

Styrofoam and fragmentary corals as a component for making bricks The effect of acid rain on the growth of pechay An antimicrobial ointment manufactured from kamangtigue leaves extractive

VIII. IX. X.

Color powder extracted from papaya leave Green algae as a potential source of fuel Palay hulls ash as component in making tiles

59 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Feasibility of discarded claim shells as aggregate in bricks making Extracting fibers from espada leaves Smart SIM alternative for microbial culture The study on the effect of ash as golden apple snail or kuhol killer to rice plant V. VI. The feasibility of croton tiglium Linn seeds The pollution extend of aguada river with biochem active pollutants and dissolved substances

60 Investigatory projects I. Persea Americana (Avocado) seed extract an anti bacterial agent against E. coli and B. subtilis II. Vinyl tiles from non biodegradable offal

61 Investigatory projects I. II. III. IV. Production of ink from mahogany pods charcoal Vinyl tiles from no biodegradable offal Surgical thread from agar-agar (Eucheuma cottonii) Utilizing solar energy as a source of power for a toy car

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