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Dunkirk

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Submitted By Ajsanford99
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Another encouraging idea to come out of Dunkirk was that although it was a military defeat, it was a big propaganda victory. This notion is identified in source B12, which is a BBC news reporter commenting (in a BBC television broadcast) on the 60th anniversary of Dunkirk in the year 2000. I can infer from the source that ‘the newspapers began to manufacture the Dunkirk Myth.’ Propaganda was used to full effect after Dunkirk as the British government took to the news and radio broadcasts to tell the public about the good things to come out of Dunkirk. This was vital as it was the first time propaganda had really been used to such effect. The fact the interpretation that Dunkirk was seen as a victory is described in this source as a ‘myth,’ this shows this was a fabrication used by the government in order to boost morale. I can also infer from the source that the government ‘allowed nothing to be published which might damage morale.’ This further supports the impression that the government were keen to keep up peoples spirits. By allowing the myth to flourish, it would also reassure the government’s reputation as it would encourage the idea that Britain has amazing leaders and is in safe hands.
This source therefore supports the interpretation that Dunkirk was a big propaganda victory. This source is useful because the BBC hold a very highly regarded reputation because it is a well trusted news station worldwide. And so, it would be unlikely that the BBC would do anything to tarnish their reputation. This source grasps the purpose of educating people. The source doesn’t have a specific audience, but it’s likely it was aimed at the public which listen to the BBC news and historians researching the effective use of propaganda to come out of Dunkirk.

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