East Asia Culture

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In his chapter, "Consumption in Everyday Life," John Storey discusses various aspects of subcultures. Please identify at least two examples of subcultures that we have studied in this course and provide specific quotations from Storey's chapter (including the page number where you found the quotation) that demonstrate how your examples fit his description of subcultures.

Extra Credit (+1 pt): Can you think of a subculture we've studied in this course that DOES NOT match Storey's description? How is it different from the kind of subcultures Storey discusses?

In Storey’s article “Consumption in everyday life”, he discusses the youth subculture, and he mentions that “youth subcultures are an attempt to solve problems experienced by the parent culture” (Storey, 133), and youth subculture “refuse to conform to the supposed passive commercial tastes of the majority of youth” (Storey, 138). In Epstein’s article, he presents the phenomenon the Korean teenagers begin to pay attention to the “punk” culture, including the bars (which called “drug”), the punk music and so on. In his article, many Korean teenagers are interviewed and present that the reason that they are interested in this “punk” culture is because they want to identify themselves different from their parents’ culture section. They think their parents’ culture is too far away from their current life, and they cannot find the majority of common points through their parents’ culture. Then, they begin to search a new culture that they could identify themselves. However, this new culture is not really new, it shares some same area with their parents’ culture, and their culture can only be called as subculture. For example, the Korean teenagers who saw they belong to “punk” were not really “punk” that as we known exists in the European countries. Those Korean teenagers present that they just want to relax…...

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