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Eastern and Western Philosphers

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By Carol23
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Eastern and Western Philosophers

PHI/105
7-18-10
James Boen

Philosophy is normal in two categories Eastern and Western Philosophy. There is a difference between them Eastern Philosophy is mostly Asian philosophies like Buddhism and Hinduism of Indian Philosophies. Eastern Philosophy is the study of a journey in distance. Eastern philosophy travels back to a period in time that leaves a message for today (Moore & Bruder, 2008, pg 525) Western Philosophy is different from Eastern Philosophy it is more thinking and studying of guidance of a full and contented life. (Moore & Bruder, 2008, pg 525) I think an Eastern Philosopher who had very good ideas or theories was Siddhartha Gautama who was later known as Buddha. Buddha is a well known philosopher about suffering. I also think everyone in the world can relate to Buddha theory on suffering, we all go through it at times in life some more than others. Siddhartha did leave a good life behind to understand why suffering may exist and what the cure for suffering maybe out there. It took some time for Siddhartha to figure out why suffering exists in the world. He came up with an answer to suffering in the” Four Noble Truths: (1) There is suffering; (2) suffering has specific and
Identifiable causes; (3) suffering can be ended; (4) the way to end suffering is
Through enlightened living as expressed in the Eightfold Path.” (Moore & Bruder, 2008, pg 530) Buddha found suffering to be a reality for humankind and uncertainly in the world. Also that people problems come from a change of uncertainty, anxiety, and fear causes. According to Buddha the cause of human suffering are ignorance, enlightment and self craving. This happens out of unclearly, in the world. Buddha also believed meditation, self-abnegation, and self craving can overcome ignorance. By doing this you may be able to overcome suffering…...

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