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Economic Immigration: the Case of Spain

In: Business and Management

Submitted By veni0506
Words 4665
Pages 19
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Университет за Национално и Световно Стопанство

Направление: Икономика с преподаване на Английски език

КУРСОВА РАБОТА

тема : Economic immigration: the case of Spain

Изготвил: Венелина Цветанова Каменова

Фак. Ном.: 10114103

Преподавател: Кръстьо Петков

2010 година

Съдържание

Why did I choose this topic?

I. Introduction

1. The term immigration

1.1 The term immigration and the general theories behind it

1.2. Economic migrant

2. Global immigration

3. Immigration in Europe

1. Immigration within Europe

2. Immigration from outside of Europe

II. The case of Spain

1. Immigration laws and policies in Spain

2. Main countries from where people emigrate to Spain

1. Bulgarians in Spain

3. Main reasons for choosing Spain

III. Conclusion

The data used in this project is from year 2005.

Why did I choose this topic?

Watching half of my classmates applying in foreign universities and many of my friends and family choosing to live abroad in order to have “better life” made me wonder what the reasons behind the migrations are. I was interested in the scientific explanation behind the migration processes. This paper gave me the opportunity to understand the incentives behind people’s decisions and the main reasons, pushing people from our own country.

And even if I didn’t choose the case of Spain for my topic it proved to be a very interesting one. I learned many new things while writing this paper and it was really interesting to read all this information about immigrants and their reasons to go to Spain and not some other country.

I. Introduction

1. The term immigration and the general theories behind it...

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