Free Essay

Educator in a Pastoral Role

In: Other Topics

Submitted By Lungstasim
Words 3282
Pages 14
CONTENTS Title Page no. SECTION ONE: BACKGROUND 1 Introduction........................................................................................................2 2.1 Interpretation of Tina’s story.........................................................................3 1.2 Effects.................................................................................................................4 1.2.1 Effects of child abuse..............................................................................4 1.2.2 Effects of sexual abuse and emotional abuse...........................................5 1.3 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs................................................................................6 SECTION TWO: GUIDANCE FOR TINA 2.1 Definition of counselling........................................................................................7 2.2 Differentiation between counselling and support for learning problems.............8
2.3 Phenomenon of child trauma and its effects..........................................................9
2.4 Differentiation between parental involvement and parental counselling...........10
2.5 Learning intervention program..........................................................................
2.6 Guidelines taken into account............................................................................

INTRODUCTION
SECTION ONE: BACKGROUND

One of the most important roles of an educator
In a school is to assist learners pastorally (Best, Lang, Lodge, Wattkins 1995: 63).

Each year in South Africa approximately five million children experience some form of traumatic experience. More than two million of these are victims of physical and/or sexual abuse. Millions more are living in terrorizing atmosphere of domestic violence. Natural disasters, car accidents, life threatening medical conditions, painful procedures, exposure to community violence all can have traumatic impact on the child (Perry 2003:3).
A wise man called Laurell K. Hamilton once said:
“There are wounds that never show on the body that are deeper and more hurtful than anything that bleeds”. But how does a child deals with such hurtful events?
In this assignment, I will firstly: * Interpret Tina’s story and discuss possible effects of a traumatic experience * Discuss effects of child abuse * Discuss effects of sexual abuse and emotional abuse * Discuss Maslow’s hierarchy of needs

Later, I will: * Define the concept counselling * Differentiate between counselling and support for learning problems * Discuss phenomenon of child trauma and the effects on Tina’s life. * Differentiate between parental involvement and parental counselling * Provide a learning intervention program for Tina and * Discuss guidelines taken into account in Tina’s case.

1.1 Effects of traumatic experience

Tina is an eleven year old girl who has been sexually abused by her step-brother, John. As a teacher one of the most important roles of an educator in a school is to assist learners pastorally (Norms and standard for educators, 2000). Tina has disclosed that she has been sexually abused ever since her mother’s marriage to John’s father.

Before this incident Tina was blamed for her father walking out of their lives when she was three years old. Recently her step-brother, John has sexually abused her. Tina is living under daily trauma knowing that she can’t tell her mother about what has happened and how she feels. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word trauma as “emotional shock following a stressful event or a physical injury, which may lead to long-term neurosis”.

Tina’s life has now changed. She is disturbed mentally. It is not easy for her to forget what has happened in her life. Robinson (2013:15) maintains that when bad things happen, it can take a while to get over the pain and feel safe again. Tina now sees her home as a frightening and dangerous place to be. Her sense of safety and security has been disturbed. The relationship between Tina and her mother is not good. In most cases Tina’s mother blames her for every wrong deed that happens around their family.

Before this incident Tina was blamed for her father walking out of their lives when she was three years old. Recently she has blamed her for not making an effort to be a family. It is clear that Tina’s mother put her husband and step-child before Tina of which it is becomes difficult for Tina to communicate her feeling with her mother. Bowly 1998; A Miller 1987 state that children are by nature dependant on others. It is through their relationship with others that they gain a sense of security and belief that the world is a safe place. Tina’s ability to trust and rely on her mother is shattered.

Tina took long to disclose that she has been sexually abused. Most victims do not disclose the abuse until long after it occurred (London, Bruck, Ceci & Shuman, 2005). Most children do not report or disclose the child sexual abuse experiences because they are afraid of not believed (Lundquist, Hasson, Suedin, 2004). Her traumatic experience has had an effect on the physical health and mental. She is suffering from a severe fear anxiety and depression. She is struggling with upsetting emotions, frightening memories or a sense of a constant danger. After traumatic experience Tina will now have problems that she didn’t have before the event.

1.2 .1 Effects of child abuse

Abuse is harmful to children and the effects of abuse affect each child differently. There are different kinds of abuse like sexual, physical and emotional abuse, Hobbs (1993:47). The National Department’s Circular 12 0f 1987 defines this in a more comprehensive way. The Natal Education Department’s Circular 12 of 1987 states that child abuse can be defined as physical or any adult responsible for the care and the wellbeing of a child. Depriving the child of a proper diet, medical attention and education can also constitute child abuse.

According to Lewis (1999: [i]) maintains that many South African learners are affected by trauma because of the high level of violence both within the home and in wider community. What happened to Tina is child abuse. Tina may experience a range of emotional abuse, physical problems and physiological abuse and trauma as a result of being abused by her step-brother, John. All forms of abuse are likely to result in emotional problems for Tina, in particular, a lack of self-esteem and distrusts of adults.

Effect of child abuse is extremely serious especially to Tina because she is a young girl who only has eleven years old. According to Hobbs et al (1993:47) there is physical effect of child abuse, emotional effect of child abuse and sexual effects of child abuse. These effects they are likely to be experienced by Tina. Tina might be experiencing guilty and self-blame, nightmare, insomnia, fear of thing associated with the abuse. Tina might experience difficulties in forming satisfactory relationships with other adults.

Tina has been a victim of child abuse. Engelbrecht & Mosiane (1997:10) states that many South African children are abused and assaulted daily; some are even killed some people do not respect the fundamental rights of others, especially those of woman and children who are usually vulnerable. Tina is likely to abuse her own children when she grows up, continuing the horrible cycle of abuse.

The overall impact of abuse also depends on the child’s natural reactions to stress and ways of coping with stressful situation. Tina tried to cope for so long with this trauma but later disclose it. Maybe it had done more damage to Tina than she appears. Discussing and guiding Tina through a recovery process is crucial in this case.

1.2.2 Effects of sexual abuse and emotional abuse

Child sexual abuse is a complex phenomenon to understand. It is multi-faceted in that definition includes a broad range of behaviours, which can be perpetrated across a broad range of intra-familiar and extra-familiar relationships and there is considerable variability in the duration and frequency of the abuse (Paine & Hansen, 2002).

Robertson (1989:3) defines child sexual abuse as “any sexual activity with a child who cannot give informed consent to the activity”. This definition defines what happened to Tina. Tina felt powerless to prevent it, it happened unexpectedly and repeatedly worse it happened early in her childhood. What happened to Tina was not a one-time event of which that brings emotional abuse and physical abuse. However untreated child sexual abuse not only scars children and destroys families it also leaves offenders free to abuse and cripple future generations.

There is a close relationship between physical and emotional abuse. Robinson (2013:15) states that when bad things happen, it can take a while to get over pain and feel safe again. Tina is again likely to suffer emotional abuse. Lourie and Stefano (in Hobbs et al 1993:108) define emotional abuse as “an injury to the intellectual or psychological capacity of a child, as evidenced by an observable and substantial impairment in his or her ability to function within his or her normal range of performance and behaviour with due regard to his or her culture.

Tina has been sexually abused and she’s again emotional abused because she can’t talk her fear with her mother or step-father. Between Tina’s mother and her step-father there was poor parent-child relationship. Tina’s mother is terrorising her. Hobbs et al (1993:114) defines terrorising as where “the adult verbally assault the child, creates a climate of fear, bullies and frightens the child, and make the child believe that the world is capricious and hostile.

Tina’s mother has created a climate of fear in Tina’s life, specifically at home. She has accused her for breaking up the family. Tina’s sense of safety and security has been disrupted. This is too much for one person, especially a young girl like Tina. Tina will now have lower educational status, and have more mental health problems. This will lead to grief, depression, extreme dependency, inability to judge trustworthiness in others, mistrust, anger and hostility. This will be evident in her emotional, physical and behavioural ways.

1.3 Effects of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs

The most fundamental and basic five layers of the pyramid are self-actualization, esteem, friendship and love, security and physical needs. If these needs are not met with the exception of the most fundamental (physiological) need Tina will feel anxious and tense. Maslow’s theory suggests that the most basic level of needs must be met before the individual will strongly desire the secondary or higher level needs.

Firstly, physiological needs are the physical requirements for Tina’s survival. If these requirements are not met, her human body will not function properly and will ultimately fail. Physiological needs are thought to be the most important, they should be met. Secondly, safety needs. There was absence of physical safety in Tina’s life, of which will make her (re) experience trauma or stress disorder. Tina has a greater need to feel safe. She has a right to a safe childhood and a life free from violence. Tina’s needs include: personal security, financial security, health and well-being and safety against accidents/ illnesses and their adverse impacts.

Thirdly, love and belonging needs. This need is strong especially in Tina’s life as she is still an eleven year young girl. Due to neglect this will impact Tina’s ability to form and maintain emotionally significant relationship such as: friendship, intimacy and family. According to Maslow, humans need to feel a sense of belonging and acceptance among their social groups, regardless if these groups are large or small. Tina needs to love and be loved. If there will be an absence of love and belonging she will be susceptible to loneliness.

Fourthly, esteem need. Tina has a right to feel respected by her mother, her step-father and her step-brother, John. The right to be respected includes the need to have self-esteem and self-respect. Tina has lack of self esteem because she is mistreated and abused by her family. Esteem presents the typical human desire to be accepted and valued by others. Tina needs respect since she had lack of self-esteem. Her depression will hinder her from obtaining a higher level of self-esteem or self-respect. Deprivation of this need may lead to an inferiority complex, weakness and helplessness.

Lastly, self-actualization need. Maslow describes this level as the desire to accomplish everything that one can, to become the most that one can be. Tina needs to become what she is capable of becoming that would be her greatest achievement. Tina has a right to achieve what she believes she can achieve but she cannot do that because to achieve this need is to reach her potential. Of which it is a bit difficult for now she is traumatised mentally because of her sexual abuse. Many people do not reach this stage of self-actualization. This need is fully satisfied rarely.

SECTION TWO: GUIDANCE FOR TINA 2.1 Definition of counselling Many people will, at some point in their lives, find themselves in the role of a counsellor without having a true understanding of the concept of counselling or what the role of the counsellor entails. The Concise Oxford dictionary gives at least two definitions of counselling: “give advice to (a person) on social or personal problems, especially professionally” and “the process of assisting and guiding clients, especially by a trained person on a professional basis, to resolve especially personal, social or psychological problems and difficulties”. According to Gills (1997:2) counselling can be defined as facilitative process during which the counsellor within the framework of a special relationship, uses specific skills to help young people to help themselves more frequently. The Oxford English Dictionary defines counselling as “The provision of professional assistance and guidance in resolving personal or psychological problems”. 2.2 Differentiation between counselling and support for learning problems

Learners whose skills are below expectation for their age and ability may be identified by parents or caregivers, centres and schools as having learning difficulties. Learning difficulties can encompass a range of different problems. It can be the shortcomings in the development and use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, comprehension and mathematical abilities.

The Oxford English Dictionary states that learning difficulties is a general term which refers to children or students who experience difficulties with their learning. According to Best, Lang, Lodge, Wattkins (1995: 63) maintains that one of the most important roles of an educator in a school is to assist learners pastorally. So, if a learner experience learning problem teachers may have no option but to help the learners themselves. Someone who has a learning problem may find it hard to learn things in the normal way, as the brain is not able to receive and process information in the same way as others. They may have trouble certain tasks or displaying certain skills.

A learning problem cannot be cured but there is support available to help those with learning difficulties succeed in life. So the support for learning problems is when a teacher helps learners with their learning difficulties whereas counselling is the provision of professional assistance and guidance in resolving personal or psychological problems. Sometimes counselling is defined as to “give advice to (a person) on social or personal problems, especially professionally”, the Concise Oxford dictionary.

The teacher supports learners with their learning difficulties the counselling is a facilitative process during which the counsellor within the framework of a special relationship, uses specific skills to help young people to help themselves more frequently.

2.3 Phenomenon of child trauma and its effects

It is frustrating to know that learners’ mind can be affected by a traumatic incident such as sexual abuse at home. Homes should be a place of safety but with Tina is different. She was abused at home; this brings a lot of emotional reaction. Bisson and Shepherd (1995:718) note the following four-stage emotional reaction specific to victim of violence: * Stage 1: Initial shock and denial * Stage 2: Fear and anxiety * Stage 3: Apathy and anger, often accompanied by feelings of depression * Stage 4: Resolution

Her traumatic experience of being sexually abused has had an effect on the physical health and mental. Lewis (1995:15) holds that the trauma response has three phases, namely: * The impact phase * The recoil phase * Reintegration
According to Matsakis (1996:34); Lewis (1999:15) states that during the impact phase, which can last from a few seconds to a few days immediately after the trauma, Tina may appear emotionally disoriented, confused, irrational and disorganised. According to Lewis (199: 16), after the impact phase, the reality of the trauma begins to sink in and the trauma victim usually begins to experience feelings such as sadness, guilt and anger. Tina is also experiencing the same thing because since she was sexually abused she will go through these three phases. In the final phase (reintegration) Tina will begin to live with the trauma as a memory that is not overwhelming, and begins to re-engage with other people (Lewis 1996:16). In this phase Tina’s trust in others starts to be rebuilt and she begins to relate emotionally to others in the same way as before the trauma.

As one of the most important roles as an educator to assist learners pastorally they should help learners with their frightening situations. Lewis (1999:42) states that adult caregivers (including teachers) have a significant influence on the child’s ability to recover from trauma. Educators can help the learner to cope with frightening situations, but if the teacher is not available that can increase the learner’s distress. 2.4 Differentiation between parental involvement and parental counselling

Most children have two main educators in their lives – their parents and their teachers. Parents are the prime educators until the child attends an early years setting or starts school and they remain a major influence on their children’s learning throughout school and beyond. The school and parents both have crucial roles to play. South Africa 1996 states that many South Africans rightfully feel that parents and communities should be more involved and play a bigger role in the development of their schools.

Parental involvement can be described as having an awareness of and involvement in a child’s schoolwork and a commitment to consistent communication with educators about a child’s progress at school (Epstein 2005:77-96). It involves an understanding of the interactions between parenting skills and a child’s success in school. Parental involvement is important to the educational success of a young child and generally declines when a child enters the higher grades.

According to Epstein (2005: 77-96) the benefits of parental involvement include: * Parental involvement leads to improved educational performance of children * Parental involvement foster better behaviour in classrooms * Parents who participate in decision making experience greater feelings of ownership and are more committed to supporting the schools mission * Parental involvement improves school attendance * Parental involvement creates better understanding of roles and responsibilities between parents, educators and children * Parental involvement improves the child’s emotional well-being

In contrast to parental involvement, parental counseling can be described as individual counseling designed to support and educate parents through their child’s recovery process (Shoeman 2009:105). Parental counseling is a service offered to parents who are looking for some guidance on issues pertaining to their child or adolescent.

Unlike parental involvement, parental counseling does not decline when the child reaches higher school grades but is rather a continuous and life-long process.

According to Epstein (2005:77-96) the benefits of parental counseling differ from the benefits of parental involvement (discussed above), in that parental counseling helps parents: * Understand why their child may be experiencing learning problems * Develop strategies or interventions that will empower them as parents

EDPHOD8 Unisa study guide (2014), states that parental involvement needs to go beyond the election of the schools governing body and participation in parent-teacher meetings. Parents can make many constructive contributions to schools, including the following: * Involvement in life-skills education programmes and assisting teachers in addressing the diverse need of learners * Involvement in the teaching of particular skills, topics or areas of information * Fundraising * Involvement in sport, cultural and other extramural activities * The maintenance of equipment and facilities

2.5 Learning intervention program
2.6 Guidelines taken into account

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

The Educator in a Pastoral Role

...The educator in a pastoral role Registration period: Semester 2, 2015 Student surname │ number: Mennell │ 50918818 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE ASSIGNMENT RUBRIC 1 1 SECTION 1: BACKGROUND 2 2 SECTION 2: GUIDANCE FOR MARY 5 2.1 Concepts 5 2.2 Phenomenon of child trauma, and the effects of trauma on Mary’s life 6 2.2.1 Phenomenon of child trauma 6 2.2.2 Effects of trauma on Mary’s life 7 2.3 Parental involvement and parental counselling 8 2.4 An individual and learning intervention program for Mary 9 2.4.1 Important guidelines to take into account 9 2.4.2 Reference to the problems in terms of Mary’s subjects 9 2.4.3 Reporting the abuse, involving support services, and involving Mary’s mother 9 SOURCES CONSULTED 11 ASSIGNMENT RUBRIC According to Best, Lang, Lodge and Watkins (1995:63), one of the most important roles of an educator in a school is to assist learners pastorally. (See your study guide, p. 2) Read the following scenario: “I felt like nothing made sense… .” I am Mary. When I was 11 years old, my mum’s new boyfriend moved in with us. I thought it would be good for mum cos she had a drinking problem and was depressed, and I thought it would make her feel better having him there. At first he was ok and bought me presents, but then mostly he ignored me. Then after a few months he started doing things that made me nervous, like when I was ...

Words: 4970 - Pages: 20

Premium Essay

The Educator in Pastoral Role

...Educator in a Pastoral RoleBy zaheer0027 | April 2013 Page 1 of 14 SECTION 1 1.1 Tina is an adolescent. At 11 years old she has not yet developed, nor is she expected to have developed, a strong mental (or physical for that matter) capacity to process all negative and/or traumatic experiences that life has already thrown at her. She is at a very impressionable age.There are various points to keep in mind with respect to her unique situation viz. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. She is very young and vulnerable being 11 years old Her father was not present in her life having walked out when she was 3 years old It is very possible her mother had a slew of relationships with other men whilst she was growing up Tina’s mother is not a rational individual. It is clear her mother’s frustration has boiled over and blaming Tina for her failed marriage Mother remarried bringing a new set of dynamics to her life. The mother is working hard at keeping her new marriage afloat and is clearly not supportive of Tina The step brother is quite old compared to Tina and Tina would look at him as a protective figure in her life No mention is made of the attitude of the step father towards tina so i am inclined to assume he has not abused either emotionally or physically and is of sound mindFrom this summary it is evident Tina, at 11 years old, has endured severe and potentially lifelong trauma. Tina has grown up without a solid father figure in her life. A man/father-figure is seen as the solid rock or......

Words: 603 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Professional Learning in Education

... Students are to select one theme from the list of eleven outlined in the unit Reader. Students are asked to: Explore a theme (in the light of the unit) a) Briefly describe the main aspects of the theme; b) Justify why you chose this theme; c) Provide a brief one paragraph outline for each of 6 readings or articles that are relevant to this theme (articles in the reader can be used); d) In the light of the theme develop either a booklet, or a policy relevant to your role as a leader Students are to select one theme from the list of eleven outlined in the unit Reader. Students are asked to: Explore a theme (in the light of the unit) e) Briefly describe the main aspects of the theme; f) Justify why you chose this theme; g) Provide a brief one paragraph outline for each of 6 readings or articles that are relevant to this theme (articles in the reader can be used); h) In the light of the theme develop either a booklet, or a policy relevant to your role as a leader The nurturing and development of teachers in Catholic Schools is a constant consideration for all educational leaders. A successful Catholic education facility needs to demonstrate consistent commitment to the ongoing development of the whole child. This development needs to reflect the Gospel teachings, while offering current theories and practices embedded in student learning opportunities. Professional development and mentoring of staff is a vital component in......

Words: 2676 - Pages: 11

Premium Essay

Edphod8

...EDPHOD8/1/2012Ð2014 98753223 3B2 Karin-mod Style CONTENTS Learning unit PREFACE SECTION 1 A theoretical framework 1 The pastoral role of the educator in South African public schools: a theoretical framework SECTION 2 Practical examples 2 Understanding cultural diversity in my public school classroom 3 The ABC of building schools for an integrated South African society Ð diverse people unite 4 Education for human rights and inclusivity 5 Child abuse: an educator's guide for the Senior Phase and FET 6 HIV/AIDS education at school 7 Educators' pastoral role in their schools and communities: an opportunity to care SECTION 3 Crisis and trauma in adolescence 8 Crisis: the theory 9 The crisis intervener and the person in crisis: prevention, prejudice and the intervener 10 Crisis intervention: general models 11 The skills for ensuring a positive relationship and interview between the crisis intervener and the adolescent in crisis SECTION 4 The religious world of the learner 12 Understanding religious diversity in my school 186 122 136 144 168 16 24 41 57 81 92 Page (iv) 2 EDPHOD8/1/2012±2014 (iii) PREFACE The study material for this module comprises four sections. Section 1: The theoretical framework for the pastoral role of the educator (see learning unit 1) Section 2: Practical examples to illustrate the applied competence of the community, citizenship and pastoral role (see learning units 2 to 7) Section 3: Knowledge, skills, values and attitudes pertaining to the......

Words: 100366 - Pages: 402

Premium Essay

Edphod8

...Question 1: 1.1 Effects of the trauma resulting from the mother marrying John’s father. 02 1.2 Child abuse 1.3.1 Effects of child abuse 03 1.3.2 Effects of emotional abuse 03 1.3 Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs 04 Question 2: 2.1 Guidance for Tina 05 2.2 Child trauma 05 2.3 Parental counselling 06 2.4 Learning intervention for Tina 07 Question 1 1.1 Effects of the trauma resulting from the mother marrying John’s father. * Already Tina was traumatised by her own father leaving them when she was only three years old, at that age not understanding what had happened and still her mother blamed her, resulting in Tina being confused, upset and mostly all alone with no one to comfort her in her father’s absence. Dealing with accusation and bitterness throughout her childhood and adolescence. * Tina does not have anyone whom she can trust as her mother treats her differently since her own father abandoned them. She was afraid to tell her mother about John’s advances as her mother will blame her yet again for the family breaking up or growing apart. She experiences emotional turmoil, confusion, helplessness, sadness with no one to confide in or anyone to believe her. * Home was supposed to be a sanctuary a place where Tina was supposed to feel safe and secure not threatened and victimised. * She has no sanctuary except for school and not having had help to get over her father’s abandonment that her mother blamed and......

Words: 374 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Paper

...1.1 The possible effects of a traumatic experience. The Psychology dictionary describes trauma as any unpleasant psychological or physical experience, which may have a detrimental influence usually of a long lasting nature on the development of the personality of a person. Examples are an accident or the death of a loved one .Trauma overwhelms the general feeling of control, connection and reason and replaces it with intense fear, helplessness, and loss of control and threat of annihilation (Van der Walt, 2007:7). With reference to the above definitions, with regard to trauma and traumatic experiences it is rather clear that Tina has been affected by these experiences. Her step brother has been sexually abusing her for a period of six months, thus she has been exposed physically and psychologically to trauma. It is clear that, her behaviour to avoid her stepbrother, displays fear and helplessness within her own home. If Tina is not assisted and supported by responsible and adults and caregivers the situation will affect her dramatically in time. She might later in life not trust anyone or see reason to trust people due to fear or loss of control. Her sense of support from family ,friends or teachers , will determine the sense of identity and belonging. Tina has the added pressure and stress coming from her mother who blames her for her father leaving them at 3 years old(which a is a traumatic experience on its own) and then to experience guilt for such a situation can......

Words: 599 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Concept of Critical Care

...CONCEPT OF CRITICAL CARE Critical care nursing is that specialty within nursing that deals specifically with human responses to life-threatening problems. * As defined by the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses: Specialized nursing care of critically ill patients who have manifest or potential disturbances of vital organ functions. Critical care nursing means assisting, supporting and restoring the patient towards health, or to ease the patient’s pain and to prepare them for a dignified death. Aim To establish a therapeutic relationship with patients and their relatives and to empower the individuals’ physical, psychological, sociological, cultural and spiritual capabilities by preventive, curative and rehabilitative interventions. Illnesses and injuries commonly seen in patients on critical care units (CCUs) Gunshot wounds Traumatic injuries Cardiovascular disorders Surgeries Respiratory disorders Shock THE EVOLUTION OF CRITICAL CARE * Forty years of development in critical care and critical care nursing has given rise to a recognized specialty in nursing practice . * Critical care units have evolved over the last four decades in response to medical advances . HISTORICAL PRESPECTIVES * Florence nightingale recognized the need to consider the severity of illness in bed allocation of patients and placed the seriously ill patients near the nurses’ station. * Modern medicines boomed to its higher ladder after world war 2 * Dr.......

Words: 1275 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Edhodj

...that a person’s development moves through stages in their life and each phase will be affected by the stages of development they go through. Each phase is seen as a challenge that should be attended to as they can be directly linked to one another and cause problems in the future Ted is in adolescence stage that Erickson named the Identity vs. Role confusion Stage. He says that peer groups and role models for leadership are significant influences. Ted who had witnessed his step father abuse her mom in front of them endured some emotional pain that could lead to negative results especially in adulthood Ted is a troubled child who needs guidance on how to treat a woman and how a child should be treated by parents, He is desperate and lonely because he is always isolating himself from other children because he feels useless and unlovable The other important factor is that the stepdad still has not changed much even after Ted’s mother has gotten a protection order, which clearly indicates that Ted , his brother and mother still experience this pain inflicted by his step-dad. Ted finally decided to approach me as his educator because he could not take this pain anymore and the reason he approached me was also to seek advice and maybe get some help. I then suggest the following  The situation was be attended to as soon as possible to ensure the safety of the child and must be done through the right channel and rules...

Words: 1878 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Computerized Guidance Recording System

...SCHOOL MANAGEMENT MANUAL For Rectors of State Secondary Schools POLICIES, PROCEDURES & GUIDELINES ON SCHOOL MANAGEMENT ISSUES School Management Division MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, CULTURE AND HUMAN RESOURCES © August 2009 TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE FOREWORD Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 ii iii 1 11 19 27 41 47 55 67 75 85 THE ORGANISATION STRUCTURE MANAGING THE SYSTEM COMMUNICATION DISCIPLINE STUDENTS: ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES TOWARDS QUALITY TEACHING AND LEARNING MANAGING HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGING ASSETS, STORES AND FINANCE SAFETY AND SECURITY AT SCHOOL MISCELLANEOUS ISSUES MANAGING THE SYSTEM 3 i PREFACE Rectors, as Heads of School, are expected to exemplify good leadership and management techniques, very often, in conditions of uncertainty. The social system of the school comprising staff, students as well as the Community of parents at large, looks up to the Rector for leadership and an inclusive atmosphere. While the School Development Plan is available in all institutions as an indication of the direction to follow, the Rector needs support and resources to make critical decisions on a day-to-day basis. These decisions may well relate to pedagogical matters as much as to disciplinary cases. Nevertheless, it is also vital to understand that a Head of School cannot do it alone. He/ She will have to resort to some delegation of responsibility and especially know when and how to do......

Words: 38226 - Pages: 153

Premium Essay

Review Your Role, Responsibilities and Boundaries as a Teacher in Terms of the Teaching and Training Cycle. & Summarise the Key Aspects of Current Legislative Requirements and Codes of Practice Relevant to Your Subject

...Review your role, responsibilities and boundaries as a teacher in terms of the teaching and training cycle. & Summarise the key aspects of current legislative requirements and codes of practice relevant to your subject and type of organization within which you work. “The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires.” William A. Ward (www.adprima.com), 2011 Teaching is both an art and science. Science because it is a systematic knowledge gained through observation and experimentation (exploration) and art because it is the craft which uses specific principles and methods (creative).A proficient teacher has to make sure that both aspects are applied while blending in to the environment. Teaching as a profession has changed over a period of time and so has the role of a teacher. The conventional role of a teacher was to just impart information to students and students were expected to learn and understand it. Now, with extensive research done on how student learn, a new insight has developed and hence the role of teacher has changed. Innumerable learning theories, e.g. Sensory, Kolb’s experiential theory, Skinner’s behaviorist’s theory and the learning domains (Cognitive, Psychomotor, Affective) Gravells (2008),(Behavioral, Cognitive and Humanistic) Roger (1996) have been identified and related to diverse strategies to cope with individual learning styles. On the other hand, Reece and Walker......

Words: 2032 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

The Navajo of the American Southwest

...The Navajo of the American Southwest Timothy Barker The Navajo of the American Southwest “The one called farm is your mother. Those that are called your livestock are your mother. Those called sheep are your mother. Sheep are life.” Begishe and Werner (as cited in Whitherspoon, 1970) The Navajo of the American Southwest are the largest recognized tribe in the United States. The Diné (meaning “the People”), as they prefer to be called, were originally nomadic hunter and gathers. They migrated from the pacific northwest of North America about 700 years ago. After encountering the Spanish in the 16th century, who introduced the Navajo to sheep, they soon became pastoral and started growing small crops. In the following, their social organization, kinship system, beliefs, and healing practices will be briefly examined to gain a better insight into their unique culture. To the Navajo all society and culture in inexorable tied to its world of mythology. In the mind of the Navajo there are of the Fourth World of creation. In the Fourth World, First Man and First Woman took a turquoise figure of a baby girl and laid it between two perfect buckskin blankets. While they sand the sacred songs, Wind entered between the buckskins. Afterwards First Man removed the top buckskin revealing a baby girl who was to be called Changing Woman. She was called this because she reached puberty in 12 days. From the union of Changing Woman and the Sun are all the Earth Surface People, the......

Words: 2227 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

Factors That Affect the Academic Performance of the Students Staying at Pic Dormitory

...process. So to have better classroom performance and lower drop out incidence, many colleges require students to stay in school dormitories especially those students who live far from school like Cavite, Tarlac, Laguna, Batangas etc. It is widely believed that living in campus dormitory can acquire some benefits in their academic performance. Large universities provide a number of academic services in dormitories such as tutoring and student organizations that encourage an environment conducive to learning. Residence halls have served as an essential aspect of collegiate life since the early colonial colleges.  Closely associated with the learning environment, early dorms housed faculty in the facilities to serve in the roles of counselors, supervisors, and educators. Historically, research on individual differences that bear on school success has focused on general intelligence. A century of empirical evidence has now unequivocally established that intelligence, defined as the “ability to understand complex ideas, to adapt effectively to the environment, to learn from experience, to engage in various forms of reasoning, to overcome obstacles by taking thought” (Neisser et al., 1996 , p. 77) has a monotonic, positive relationship with school success (Gottfredson, 2004; Kuncel, Ones, & Sackett, 2010 ; Lubinski, 2009 ). Studying in a Christian School is not that easy as well as living in their school dormitory. Many rule to be followed and kept. Students with diverse......

Words: 3017 - Pages: 13

Free Essay

Biographical Essay

...Biographical Essay John Wesley Bishop Richard Allen by David Walter History of Christianity Course TH 605. NA Dr. Louis DeCaro November 7, 2012 Church history is intertwined with many historical dates, events, and personalities. Two extraordinary influential personalities that shaped the landscape of early church history are John Wesley, founder of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Bishop Richard Allen, founder of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. The organizational skills and leadership of John Wesley and Richard Allen is the foundation for the permanence of the Methodist denomination. John Wesley was an Anglican minister and Christian theologian. Wesley is recognized as the founding father of the Methodist faith. His conversion to Methodism occurred while attending an outdoor evangelism service conducted by George Whitfield. Wesley, an 18th Century preacher, held to Arminianism which was the prevailing faith of the Church of England. Wesley persuaded others to experience a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. The traditions of Wesley, known as Wesleyanism, gave beginnings to many powerful church movements: Methodist, Holiness, Pentecostalism, Charismatic, and Neo-charismatic. Wesley stressing evangelism purified Arminianism and the doctrine of justified by faith was reformed. John Wesley was born June 28, 1703 in Epworth, Linconshire, England. He was the fifteenth child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley. As the custom of that day, his...

Words: 3968 - Pages: 16

Premium Essay

Edphod8

...EDPHOD8 Moksha Bridglall: 43903738 Assignment 01 Contents Topic: Page: Question 1: 1.1 Effects of the trauma resulting from the mother marrying John’s father. 02 1.2 Child abuse 1.3.1 Effects of child abuse 03 1.3.2 Effects of emotional abuse 03 1.3 Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs 04 Question 2: 2.1 Guidance for Tina 05 2.2 Child trauma 05 2.3 Parental counselling 06 2.4 Learning intervention for Tina 07 Question 1 1.1 Effects of the trauma resulting from the mother marrying John’s father. * Already Tina was traumatised by her own father leaving them when she was only three years old, at that age not understanding what had happened and still her mother blamed her, resulting in Tina being confused, upset and mostly all alone with no one to comfort her in her father’s absence. Dealing with accusation and bitterness throughout her childhood and adolescence. * Tina does not have anyone whom she can trust as her mother treats her differently since her own father abandoned them. She was afraid to tell her mother about John’s advances as her mother will blame her yet again for the family breaking up or growing apart. She experiences emotional turmoil, confusion, helplessness, sadness with no one to confide in or anyone to believe her. * Home was supposed to be a sanctuary a place where Tina was supposed to feel safe and secure not threatened and......

Words: 2186 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Ece 101

...Week 1 Assignment Hi Professor Beckett, This is the link to my website. Hope I did this right =) http://648913701206793004.weebly.com/ Trends/Issues-Head Start and Early Head Start were programs that were organized for low-income/poverty families. These programs are usually free to those families that qualify. Many times families run into hardships or even for our young teen moms want to finish school they now have an opportunity to receive free childcare while they get on their feet. These programs also offer other programs that help families in need such as free diapers, milk, clothing, and housing/shelter assistance. Project Head Start and Early Head Start has had a great impact on me because I have had the opportunity to work for both programs for 5 years. Many times the children I worked with came in hungry, tired, and sometimes dirty. Many of them came from dangerous living areas where they was a lot of drugs, shootings, and violence. So for me as a teacher a lot of times it forced me to put all my problems aside because I realized that each one of those children that were in my care needed my smile, hugs, love, and support | Theory/Learning Approach-The Montessori model would be the choice I would possibly use in the future when I open my own childcare center. The three things I would like to see in my Montessori classrooms is materials being displayed on shelves at the children’s level, my classroom being multi-aged, and the children’s choice on how they......

Words: 2224 - Pages: 9