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Effect of Organisational Change

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6.0 Advantages and disadvantages of organisational change
Organisational change is usually good for any organisation because it can bring the fresh idea for the organisation. However, it also can be a challenge in any organisation if the strategy is not implemented properly. It will bring either the positive or negative effect to any organisation if use the change. Next we will discuss some advantages and disadvantages that can affect an organization.
6.1 Advantages of organisational change
6.1.1 Improved organisational performance
The first advantage is improved organisational performance. (D’Netto et al, 2000) It can help the organisation to perform better. It may become higher productivity through use the advance in technology, training and other else. Besides that, the employees have more knowledge and pool of information about how to use machine or efficient use of the resources. For the example, the Toyota Company implement a concept which is JIT (Just in Time) to reduce the cost and promote the benefit of product (Likert, 2004). It is also the oldest and first way by Toyota and still uses it now. After that, Toyota add automation concept into management. They realize that Toyota way is also the most important change in Toyota’s management. So, they implement TPS which is Toyota Production System become philosophy of production management.
6.1.2 Flexibility
The second advantage is flexibility (Mullins, 2010). That is because change can be implemented without heavy affecting the operation of business. This flexibility allows the organisation to respond and take corrective action more quickly if there have any problem. For the example, Coca-Cola Company wishes to change the taste and expectation of the consumers. But during the mid-1980s, they realize that Americans prefer the sweet taste of the rival product and they realize that this organisation...

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