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Effectiveness of Juvenile Incarceration

In: Other Topics

Submitted By Lacrisha20
Words 1357
Pages 6
Lacrisha Lewis
Patrick Anyanetu
Eng.120
11/18/10

Research Paper

“A Good Man Is Hard To Find” by Flannery O’Connor who is a Southern American novelist and short story writer, O’ Connor’s career expanded in the 1950sand early 60s, a time when the South was dominated by Protestant Christians.O’Connor was born and raised a Catholic. She was a fundamentalist and aChristian moralist whose powerful apocalyptic fiction is focused in the South.Flannery O’Connor was born March 25, 1925 in Savannah, Georgia. O’ Connorgrew up on a farm with her parents Regina and Edward O’ Connor. At the age offive, she taught a chicken to walk backwards. O’Connor attended Georgia StateCollege for women, now Georgia College, in Milledgeville, majoring in sociology.She had showed a gift for satirical writing, as well as cartooning since she wasa child. By the end of her undergraduate education, O’Connor knew that writingwas her true passion. She spent two years at the prestigious School for Writersat the State University of Iowa on scholarship. She received a master’s degree infine arts in 1947. In 1950, she had a near fatal attack of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic inflammatory connective tissue disorder that causes periods of joint pain and fatigue, and can attack the hearts, lungs, and kidneys. Her father died of the disease when she was fifteen. She would have to walk with crutches for the rest of her life. By her death at the age of 39, Flannery O’Connor won a prominent place in modern American literature. She was an anomaly among post-World War II writers, a Roman Catholic from the Bible Belt South, whose purpose was to reveal the mystery of God’s grace in everyday life. Aware that few readers shared her faith, O’Connor chose to depict salvation through shocking, and often violent action upon characters who were spiritually or physically grotesque. Flannery O’Connor’s...

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