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Electoral Race

In: Social Issues

Submitted By pudge52
Words 1616
Pages 7
Jarrod Brown 11/17/10

Nevada Gubernatorial Race: 2010

Nevada, the home of the infamous adult playground Las Vegas was admitted into the United States of America under Abraham Lincoln in 1864. Admission into the union was rushed to help ensure Lincoln's reelection for his second term. The state held strong ties to big business and helped lead to Lincoln winning the election. The history of Governors in Nevada is split almost even with thier being only a handfull more republicans throughout history than democrats, and a handful of silver party members serving as well. Governors in Nevada are limited to serve two terms of four years each. The race for governor this year was never really a tight one as Brian Sandoval held the lead in polls throughout the race, it was still a competitive fight between Sandoval and Rory Reid. Much controversey did however make the republican nomination interesting. (Huffington Post 2) As time led to the primary elections the bid for the democratic nomination might as well have been uncontested. Rory Reid, Chairman of the Clark County Commission,only had an opponent by definition from Frederick L. Conquest. Reid the son of senate majority leader Harry Reid, easily took the win in the primary election becoming the democratic nominee and awaiting to see who would rise to face him from the complicated republican side. (Center for Politics) The exciting part of the entire election lies within the republican primaries. Incumbant Governor Jim Gibbons who had served eight years in congress, and had also attmepted a run at governor of Nevada in 1994, was rumored to not be running for re-election. Personal and political problems plagued Gibbons reputation. A questionable divorce, rumors of affairs and the terrible state in which Nevada citizens found thier economy in, were all reasons that Gibbons was beleived to not be running. Nonetheless, in March of 2010 Gibbons pushed onward toward being re-elected and made his bid for the republican nomination. His oposition was former federal judge Brian Sandoval. Sandoval held a double digit lead in the polls during most of the months leading up to the election. The polls held true and Gibbons was the first incumbent in Nevada history to not continue on to another term. (Center for Politics) Current Mayor of Las Vegas Oscar Goodman was on the verge of running on an independent platform. With his final term coming to an end in 2011 the 69-year-old mayor considered running for Governor but decided he would rather stay closer to home. After three terms he would have surely added an unpredictable variable to the race, pulling support from unafilliated voters and those who already support him. He spoke with Jesse Ventura, former governor of Minnesota about running as an independant, that being how Ventura ran and won his election.(Ball)Without his bid there were no major third party candidates for governor in 2010 for Nevada.

Rory Reid, the democratic candidate, was born in Alexandria, Virginia in 1963. The former sports writer for the Las Vegas Sun, began his political career in 2002 when he was elected to the Clark County Commission and reelected n 2006. Reid acted as Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman in 2008 for Nevada. The law school graduate. In October of 2009 Reid formally declared that he would be running for governor and had plans for creating new jobs for the state and its crippled economy. Brian Sandoval Born in 1963 in Redding California. At the start of his career in 1994 Sandoval was elected to two terms in the Nevada Assembly. During his four years on assembly he helped push 14 bills through that became laws. After the assembly Sandoval served as a member of the Nevada Gaming Commission, helping regulate the gaming industry in Nevada. Just one year later Sandoval became the chairman of the gaming commission at just 35-years-old. Sandoval is decorated heavily with many awards for his work in politics. Other than a small issue brought up consisting of Alliance for Americas Future being accused of running ads supporting Sandoval against Gibbons without registering as a public action committee(Huffington Post 1) , Sandoval has a clean slate backing him up. The lawsuit brought forth by the Secretary of State asks for a 5,000 dollar fine be paid for each time the add aired. d The resumes between Reid and Sandoval do not even compare. On paper this election looks easy if you are Sandoval.

The issues at hand during this election are more typical and agreed upon than usual. The two candidates focus on the same goals and are making similar plans to implement if they are elected. The competition for votes seems more based on the publics trust in the nominee to carry out thier plans and improve on issues rather than the usual party affiliation. With the state being obviously unhappy with how Gibbons handled the position it would almost seem that the state would lean more democratic but that is not the case here as the republican party is been constantly favored. The state has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country and is one of the biggest concerns for voters and politicians alike. Reid has his platform built on creating new jobs to help the crumbling economy, improving education and rebuilding the trust that Nevada has in its' politicians. On the otherside you have Brian Sandoval who is not planning to raise taxes just as Gibbons before him has operated. He supports the death penalty and beleivs in citizens right to bear arms. Sandoval is against the healthcare bill wants to start a teacher pay scale based on performance. Overall The two candidates are splitting the difference with each tackling thier own set of public interests. (Baumer) As the race comes to the finish line Reid is trailing Sandoval by over 20 points. Rasmussen reports survey of likely voters indicates the republican to lead with 58 percent to the democrats 35 percent. Sandoval has led Reid by double digits since February and has never allowed Reid to get close to having a fathomable shot in this election. The poll was conducted in late October surveying 750 voters. The sampling error was +/- 4 points and had a 95 percent confidence level. Sandoval has the approval of over 90 percent of republicans in Nevada while Reid only held support of 74 percent, despite a visit to the state from Obama to endorse Reid's father for his senate run. After the election of a charismatic leader such as in President Obama's case, 80 percent of voters in Nevada reported that the candidates position on issues will preside over thier personal character when voting. (RasmussenReports.com) When the results came down on November 13, it was no surprise that formal federal judge Brian Sandoval took the election. Accumulating 53 percent of the votes compared to Reid's 42 percent the race may have come out a little closer than I or anyone else expected but still a clear victory for the GOP and hopefully the state. (Town Hall) Voters surely had certain reasons for the way they voted but I believe that Sandovlas long commitment to the state, achievments and the way the public views him ultimately led to his victory. Reid's association with his father wether they agree or disagree politically, may have hurt his chance at winning the election. With the country moving to give republicans the power back in the senate, the tie to the democrat may have caused a negative association. If you are not voting for one Reid you probaly will not vote for the other even if only because of association. Reid just did not stand up to the political background of Sandoval and under comparison it was just to easy for the republican candiate to take the job of governor from Jim Gibbons. Other than the drama of the republican primary consisting of an unpopular incombant pitted against a fresh new upcomer, this race seemed pretty uneventful and had a fairly clear finish line from the beginning.

Works Cited Page

1. Rasmussen Reports http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/elections/election_2010/election_2010_governor_elections/nevada/election_2010_nevada_governor

2. Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/13/nevada-governor-2010-elec_n_539379.html#s93624

3 . The New York Times http://elections.nytimes.com/2010/governor/nevada 4. Molly Ball: Las Vegas Review Journal http://www.lvrj.com/news/breaking_news/47891957.html

5.Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/06/08/brian-sandoval-wins-nevad_n_605367.html

6. http://www.briansandoval.com/brian

7.Richard E. Berg-Anderson: The Green Papers http://www.thegreenpapers.com/G10/gpaag.phtml

8. Jennifer Baumer : Nevada Business http://www.nevadabusiness.com/issue/0610/1/2245 9. Townhall http://election.townhall.com/election-2010/state/NV/ 10. Center for Politics http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/2010-governor-races/governor/nevada-governor-2010/ Works Cited Page

1. Rasmussen Reports http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/elections/election_2010/election_2010_governor_elections/nevada/election_2010_nevada_governor

2. Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/13/nevada-governor-2010-elec_n_539379.html#s93624

3 . The New York Times http://elections.nytimes.com/2010/governor/nevada 4. Molly Ball: Las Vegas Review Journal http://www.lvrj.com/news/breaking_news/47891957.html

5.Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/06/08/brian-sandoval-wins-nevad_n_605367.html

6. http://www.briansandoval.com/brian

7.Richard E. Berg-Anderson: The Green Papers http://www.thegreenpapers.com/G10/gpaag.phtml

8. Jennifer Baumer : Nevada Business http://www.nevadabusiness.com/issue/0610/1/2245 9. Townhall http://election.townhall.com/election-2010/state/NV/ 10. Center for Politics
http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/2010-governor-races/governor/nevada-governor-2010/

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