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Emergency Department (Ed) Was Implementing a Lab Information System Rather Than an Emr, How Would That Impact Patient Flow? Explain.

In: Business and Management

Submitted By godwic
Words 864
Pages 4
Case Study
Carrol Godwin
Southern New Hampshire University
HCM 500

1. What if the study had shown the emergency department (ED) was implementing a lab information system rather than an EMR, How would that impact patient flow? Explain.
2. What would have changed if the implementation was planned for the early summer or late spring?
3. What elements are needed in order to ensure patient safety?
4. Depending on your discipline, address one of the following questions (you may respond to both, if desired):
 As a nurse manager, what would you like to have seen done differently with the implementation?
 As the office manager, you oversee the staffs who admit patients to both the ED and overflow clinic. What could you have done differently to make the implementation go more smoothly?
5. The next phase of the EMR implementation plan involves the ICU and NICU. What recommendations would you make to modify the implementation plan based on the ED experience? Explain.
6. After reading this case, how will you use the lessons learned to implement your group project?
In my case study I will discuss the impact on the workflow in the Emergency Room (ER) when lab information system is implemented. I will discuss any impact on the patient flow thru the ER and the turnaround time (TAT) for lab results and any effects on the patient’s length of stay (LOS). I will discuss patient safety issues and what is needed to insure the institutions goals are met. I will look at the implementation processes for improvements and evaluate moving forward to include the ICU and NICU. Solutions and their effectiveness in the process of implementing an EMR and the effects on patient flow will be addressed. Emergency Rooms are very unique in how they function in regards to patient flow; you can find it very difficult to predict the healthcare needs of a community. Feast or famine is...

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