English Only vs. Bilingual Education

In: Social Issues

Submitted By ozzy3313
Words 780
Pages 4
I am going to be discussing multicultural education in general, but focusing more on the aspect of English only vs. bilingual education in today’s classrooms. This topic has become more and more evident in today’s education system. The topic is pretty self-explanatory, English only vs. bilingual education. Should students in America be taught only in English, regardless of the student’s first language or nationality, or should there be some influence of bilingual education?
In the 1990’s, the U.S. English Only started campaigns to promote multiculturalism under one language, English (Arce, 1998) These campaigns also propose the notion that every single aspect of public education in America should be strictly in English. Under this theory, education would be given in English regardless of age, ethnicity, sex, and English competency. Those who support this theory also feel very strongly that English should be the nationally endorsed language of the United States of America (Crawford, 1998).
This movement stretches even outside the classroom. The English Only movement proposes to take all other language almost completely out of society. These same supporters, as you can imagine, also strongly associate with anti-immigration theories fearing the costs that may come with an increase in people on unemployment and welfare programs (p. 8). The movement has grabbed momentum, as evidenced in California’s passing of Proposition 227 which is an initiative to eliminate bilingual education from the state’s public schools (Arce, 1998). It prohibits, by law, teachers, staff, and school administration from giving instruction in any language but English (p. 10). This trend is growing as the majority of the states have some sort of English only laws with respect to public education. Again, this movement is self-explanatory; to eventually cut out bilingual education…...

Similar Documents

English Only vs. Bilingual Education

...I am going to be discussing multicultural education in general, but focusing more on the aspect of English only vs. bilingual education in today’s classrooms. This topic has become more and more evident in today’s education system. The topic is pretty self-explanatory, English only vs. bilingual education. Should students in America be taught only in English, regardless of the student’s first language or nationality, or should there be some influence of bilingual education? In the 1990’s, the U.S. English Only started campaigns to promote multiculturalism under one language, English (Arce, 1998) These campaigns also propose the notion that every single aspect of public education in America should be strictly in English. Under this theory, education would be given in English regardless of age, ethnicity, sex, and English competency. Those who support this theory also feel very strongly that English should be the nationally endorsed language of the United States of America (Crawford, 1998). This movement stretches even outside the classroom. The English Only movement proposes to take all other language almost completely out of society. These same supporters, as you can imagine, also strongly associate with anti-immigration theories fearing the costs that may come with an increase in people on unemployment and welfare programs (p. 8). The movement has grabbed momentum, as evidenced in California’s passing of Proposition 227 which is an initiative to eliminate...

Words: 780 - Pages: 4

Bilingual Education Friend or Foe?

... expected to not only teach language but to teach other content within a language besides English. Culturally teachers were not just teaching the language, they were helping to teach specific values to their school systems. Then we were relying on teachers to be the catalyst to break down barriers that different languages create. The BEA, signed into law in 1968, put a huge strain on the available teaching pool, which in turn created shortages of these highly specialized teachers. Even today we face shortages of teachers for these specialized positions. The original bill, as Senator Yarborough envisioned it, was far from what was passed in 1968. It underwent significant changes between 1967 and 1968. Many of these changes were in the framing of the act. Unfortunately, it failed to recognize the strong link between language and culture. What the bill ended up doing was identifying a problem in American life that needed to be fixed. Lawmakers needed to make a way to keep LESA’s up to competency while quickly teaching them the language of our country. The bill was able to remain in existence as a defining point in American history for some 34 years. It set and increased funding for bilingual education, while setting up programs to train educators and to reward the promotion on bilingual education. It was a long reaching bill that caused the broadest change to the cultural diversity of the American landscape. (Petrzela, 2010) Lyndon B. Johnson put the......

Words: 2681 - Pages: 11

Bilingual Education: Voter Driven Initiatives

...) forced schools to do the opposite of what the name suggests. Schools were forced to ‘leave children behind’ by removing them from testing reports in order to make their statistics look better. Creating a bit of hope, the Bilingual Education Act was the first piece of federal legislation to finally recognize the needs of English language learners. This act required some instruction for English language learners to be in their native language in order to increase academic skills. This was to be done while ESL students were acquiring English language skills. This act supported the education of Spanish speaking students, and allowed funding for academic programs. Schools were given grants for student and teacher resources, teacher training, and promoting parental involvement. At the state level, Massachusetts made the first move. In response to high dropout rates and low attendance among Spanish speaking students, Massachusetts passed the Transitional Bilingual Education Act in 1971 making it the first state in the United States of America to pass a law requiring bilingual education. This law also made it so the same amount was spent on all students, ESL/ELL and standard curriculum students alike. In 2002 this act, and other initiatives to assist English language learners, were replaced. Voters voted to ban bilingual education, promoting English-only instruction. Instead of bilingual education, Massachusetts provided a one year English immersion program for students...

Words: 1274 - Pages: 6

Bilingual Education

... the country 1974: BILINGUAL EDUCATION ESTABLISHED AS POLITICAL COMPROMISE ➢ June 1974, the Bilingual Education in the Philippines (BEP) was institutionalized through Dept. Order No. 25 which mandated the use of English in the teaching of mathematics and science, and Pilipino in the teaching of all other subjects both in elementary and secondary schools (Pascasio, 1975). ➢ Dominance of English in the schools was seriously challenged by another language. ➢ English was the sole medium of instruction in school from the time it was introduced in 1901 until the promulgation of bilingual education in 1974. ➢ TWO KEY POINTS: Instrumental to the EMERGENCE of BILINGUAL EDUCATION: o 1. The question about the Sole dominance of English as a colonial language in Philippine schools. A vernacular language, in the form of a national language, would arguably have better chances the English of eliminating inequalities in Philippine education perpetuated by and through the sole use of English as medium of instruction. o 2. The question about Pilipino as the national language itself. Because of ethnolinguistic rivalries, Pilipino ceased to be the national language in the Philippine constitution but it resurfaced as a medium of instruction alongside English. The debate shifted to medium of instruction, but only after a politically ingenious compromise was struck between pro-English and pro-Pilipino groups. 1987: BILINGUAL EDUCATION REAFFIRMED; ‘FILIPINO...

Words: 3502 - Pages: 15

English-Only Debate Paper

.... Doolittle (R-Cal.) proposed an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would establish English as the official language of the United States” (Answers.com, 2010). Comparing and Contrasting Both Sides of the English-Only Issue In the United States, the English-only debate has become more and more prevalent. The English-only movement advocates for an education provided in English as the official and sole language. Specialists argue that a common language is useful and helpful for the development and effective use of education. English-only partisans declare that having an official language is an unifying force for the United States. In today society, the government and minority groups are faced with this conflict. The English-only opponents are advocating for a bilingual education, which is defined as “a special effort to help immigrant children learn English so that they can do regular schoolwork with their English-speaking classmates and receive an equal educational opportunity” (Porter, 1998). It was decided that they should be taught in their native language only for a period of three years. Porter (1998) asserts that most of these bilingual programs were more concerned with teaching the native language and maintaining the ethnic culture than teaching children the English language. The advocates of bilingual education believe that a child is more likely to achieve high academic level if this individual is mastering both native and English languages. In this......

Words: 2340 - Pages: 10

Bilingual Education

... bilingual students and helps overcome culture shock (Moran para 9-20; Witte et al 3). Therefore, it can be deduced that bilingual education has been a subject of debate in many nations since the 1960s (Witte, 2009). In these earlier years, bilingual education had been found to be truly essential when it comes to the purposes of gaining some new sense of pride with particular reference to the Hispanics and those who wanted to resist Americanization. During its development, it was realized that bilingual education changed from the transitional year to bring a plan for many years with an intention of teaching children, beginning with their home language (Bentz, 2012). This would apply in situations where the home language was not English for these children. With this facilitation theory put in practice, most Spanish speakers were imprisoned in their classrooms where Spanish was the only language taught. As a result, the Spanish maintained bilingual education in their culture, with limits imposed on learning English (The New York Times, 2012) Bilingual education is paramount in the phase of multiculturalism and diversity in language as in the United States. The importance of bilingualism and bilingual education goes beyond just enhancing the accommodation of more students but an aid understanding of the content. Initiatives by discrete authorities are significant funding and sustaining bilingual education....

Words: 888 - Pages: 4

Bilingual Education

... become so important that it has created fierce debates. People, small organization and even governmental institutions are fighting each other to know if the bilingual education should be abandoned on a general view point. For some people, bilingual education GIVE CONTRAST VIEW POINT. Talking about the bilingual education in the U.S., Newt Gingrish said ironically : “the government should quit mandating that various documents be printed in any one of the 700 languages, depending on who shows up.” In his opinion, bilingual education should be replaced by immersion in English, so that people can learn the common language of country. His point sounds harsh and xenophobic but it also reveals how much bilingual education can be broad; and above all, it reveals that it has to be managed by the affected people. In other words, an adaption should be made to an only one language, not the contrary. As a response to the previous point, S. Krashen, a professor emeritus at the university of Southern California point out, in February 2004 that the strong case for the bilingual education is that it can be termed as the heritage language goal. Furthermore, a bilingual education coupled with an academic success is the perfect equation for a successful education. In another way, how bilingual education works and how it should be managed is not the problem: the only thing which is worthy is the final result. For instance, SAT which is the scholastic aptitude tests have scored results for...

Words: 701 - Pages: 3

Bilingual Education

...Bilingual Education For almost two centuries, communities throughout the United States have had some system of bilingual education. “An 1839 Ohio law allowed for instruction in German, English, or both in the classroom, according to the wishes of parents” (Leal and Hess 2000). This was a system constructed to help non English speaking students learn English and still prosper in schools. However, more recently we have seen hostility towards languages other than English being the language of instruction. After the devastating events of 9/11 and the more recent increase in legal and illegal immigration, many Americans have become weary of anything that appears to be un-American. Fears of foreigners coming over to “their” country and taking over are being exacerbated by the media and various laws have been proposed and enacted to outlaw non-English instruction in American primary and secondary schools. The articles, The Politics of Bilingual Education Expenditures in Urban School Districts and The Proposition: English Only for Educating Children, touch on just how controversial and complex this issue has become. The issue of bilingual education started to gain more attention in 1998 when the state of California proposed an act that would end all bilingual education in that state. This proposed act was called Proposition 227. After the proposition was announced to residents of California, the state government received numerous lawsuits and criticism from people who were...

Words: 988 - Pages: 4

Bilingual Education

...Bilingual Education vs. ESL Instruction: What's the Difference? When ESL students enter the school system they are given a Home Language Survey which is used to identify the potential students that may be eligible for the ESL program. Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) are used to assess each Limited English Proficient (LEP) student. BICS is the language we need in order to be able to socialize in a social setting. CALP is the language needed for a student to read, listen, speak, write and understand in all subject areas in school. Teachers can also use informal assessments, which can be viewed as ongoing assessments, as a tool to target specific problems of areas, make the necessary adaptions to the student’s lessons, and give them availability to intervene with each student consistently. The primary goal of both English as a second language (ESL) instruction and bilingual education is to teach English each program just go about it in two different manners. English as a second language and bilingual education share the same focus of teaching students English, they are two different programs which some differences in how the class is conducted. English as a second language (ESL) instruction is used primarily in the Tennessee school systems. The ESL program is designed to teach children in English. Most of all their lessons and instructions will be provided primarily in the English Language and each student...

Words: 1066 - Pages: 5

Bilingual Education

...Bilingual Education By C. Mori When I started my investigation about bilingual education I never thought the debate about it would be as controversial and passionate as it is. But considering the numbers of English Language Learners (ELLs) in the U.S. public school, approximately 5.5 million, which represent about 11% of total number of students, and the percentage of drop outs, about 30% of ELLs, it is understandable that public opinion puts some pressure on the U.S. public school system to adopt the most efficient and adequate system for this growing minority group. The number of ELLs abandoning school has remained high for a long period of time generating serious doubts about the functionality and effectiveness of bilingual education and other programs. Two have been the main reasons attributed for this desertion from classes: the low socioeconomic level of ELLs and language differences. In this context, dual language, one modality of bilingual education, is showing to be able to make students excel in their academic performance and revert negative statistics Currently, in the United States there are two major approaches about how to teach English to those children whose primary language is different from English. The first approach is by immersing them in English only classes. This program was first implemented in California with proposition 227 in 1998 and continued to other states like Arizona and Massachusetts where bilingual education...

Words: 2438 - Pages: 10

Bilingual Education Argumentive Essay

...-English speaker the curriculum and the student will also be penalized for not understanding. Bilingual education bridges the education and knowledge gap between natives and non-natives. How can bilingual education not be an option in certain states when “…hundreds of scientific studies over the past half century have shown that bilingual education…is an effective approach for teaching second language learners” (“What is Bilingual Education?”). It is not only beneficial to non-natives; it also gives natives the chance to learn additional languages. The reputation of bilingual education is tarnished to often even though it has been “…well established by research over the past three decades – not only for English language learners but also for native-English speakers acquiring another language”(“What is Bilingual Education?”). Our society is adapting and being bilingual is becoming a criterion to hold certain positions and implementing bilingual education into every school in America can aid in making sure this requirement is met earlier than it is required now. The United States is populated by many immigrants and immigrant families. Due to assimilation, “in two or three generations immigrants and indigenous minorities learned English and often [lose] their native languages” (“What is Bilingual Education?”). In a country that is characterized as being ethnically and racially diverse, losing one’s cultural identity is not ok. The United States should aid in preserving the...

Words: 1024 - Pages: 5

Bilingual Education Policy

...Bilingual Education Policy It has been 36 years since the implementation of the bilingual education policy yet over the past decades the policy was always questioned on whether it is really helpful or not (Espiritu). The policy was defined operationally as “the separate use of English and Filipino as the media of instruction in specific subject areas” and is working on the assumption that there is a certain degree of mastery of Filipino within the student (Espiritu; Isidro et al. 113). In line with the definition, the main goals of using English and Filipino as media of instruction are (1) to bring quality education, (2) to develop Filipino for exchanging of ideas, (3) to develop English as the international language and (4) to develop competence in both English and Filipino (Espiritu). Operating under these goals and since learning involves the teacher and the student, the implementation of bilingual education policy in the Philippines is beneficial for both the students and the teachers. The bilingual education policy plays three vital roles in student’s personal success. First is that bilingual education policy provides greater job opportunities for students after graduation. Because of the bilingual education policy, students will be more exposed to the use of English and Filipino in daily conversations and soon they will develop communication skills in these languages which they could use as an asset in finding jobs. Furthermore, according to Cloud, Genesee, and...

Words: 1051 - Pages: 5

English Only

... native language for a majority of their school day and have been learning English as a second language. How can we expect students to learn a language that they are not required to use or understand for the majority of their school day? California is one of a few states that have passed a law to provide education to immigrate students in English only. “Proposition 227 was a California ballot proposition passed in the June 2, 1998 ballot” (Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia 2011). It ended bilingual education programs in the state and replaced them with the Structured English Immersion model. This provided students with a one-year program in English and then place the students back in main stream education and provide them the resources to then catch up in other academic areas. With typical bilingual education a student may be separated from their peers for several years while learning English which encourages segregation in schools. Were proposition 227 suggest students only be separated from their peers for one year while learning English this places them back with their peers sooner to encourage them to socialize with all students not just those who they have common ground. I think this in the long run provides immigrate students with a better education because there are no limits on who they can talk to or what they can do within the school system. Arizona also has passed a law similar to California, Proposition 203. Proposition 203 would remove existing...

Words: 866 - Pages: 4

Bilingual Education in the Us

... and culture of their family and heritage. 2) The United States has often struggled with the role of immigrants. Do you think debates over immigration influence teachers’ ability to provide quality language education for immigrant children? I think the biggest debate on immigration influence is english only advocates. They argue that even if bilingual education is effective, it's still a bad idea for the country because bilingualism threatens to wash out our sense of national identity and divide us along ethnic lines. They fear that any government recognition of minority languages sends the wrong message to immigrants and encouraging them to believe they can live in the USA without learning English or conforming to American ways. Such complaints have made bilingual education a target of political attacks. No doubt many of the objections to bilingual education are lodged in good faith. However, most reflect ignorance about how bilingual education works, how second languages are acquired and how the nation has responded to non-English-speaking groups in the past. 3) How might your views on immigration and bilingual education impact your teaching of an ELL student? (And just to be clear if you teach in a public school in the US you will almost certainly have ELL students in your class.) My views of immigration and bilingual education support bilingual programs with transitional linguistic and cultural goals which uses the native language and culture of the student to...

Words: 898 - Pages: 4

Japanese System of Bilingual Education

... nature of the bilingual education politics. Fourthly, if the world acts as a "multilingual", then conformed to this world bilingualism will be replaced with multilingualism. Thus, the main disadvantages of definition above related primarily to the lack universality (i.e., it’s not applicable to all nations at the first place) of this education system, but, taking into consideration modifications above, it can be accepted as "working" definition. "Japanese with English abilities" US vs. Japan Bilingual education is being held both in the United States and Japan, but in the first case this government activities are going on the base of multiculturalism, in the second case its being held on the base of the theory of intercultural communication. (It can be explained by the fact that Japanese debates on issues of bilingualism in the theory of intercultural communication are most significant ones). Convenience of comparing American and Japanese bilingual education lies primarily in the fact that American society is heterogeneous, when Japanese is homogeneous, moreover, in the world of globalization, national and homogeneous country is more likely to be regarded as an exception to the general rule of mixed cultures, supported by the policy of multiculturalism. Oppositional to multiculturalism, with its tolerance of ethnic minorities, leading to the destruction of the otherness of the "other" through its complete development, the theory and practice of intercultural...

Words: 3941 - Pages: 16