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Entry Strategies for Mnes in China: the Case of Danone and Dhl

In: Business and Management

Submitted By richmondtei
Words 3508
Pages 15
Entry Strategies for MNEs in China: The Case of Danone and DHL

International Business
Winter 2014/2015

Table of contents 1. Introduction 3 1.1. FDIs and Entry in China 3 1.2. Research Contribution 3 1.3. Research Method 3 2. Literature review 4 2.1. FDIs 4 2.2. Macro Environment 5 2.3. Timing of entry 6 3. Discussion 6 3.1. Introduction of Cases 6 3.2. Motives of Entering China 7 3.3. Joint Venture in China 8 4. Conclusion 9 4.1. Implications 9 4.2. Limitations 9 4.3. Research Outlook 9 5. References 9

1. Introduction 2.1. FDIs and Entry in China
How should MNEs enter China? MNEs are usually presented with multiple entry choices, namely export, licensing agreements, franchising and FDIs. While each mode presents advantages and disadvantages, FDIs cause MNEs to make direct investments and be directly present in foreign countries, as opposed to indirect investments and presence through other modes of entry, hence the name “foreign direct investment”. But with direct presence in a foreign country MNEs are subject to both formal and informal institutions, and those institutions will directly influence a company’s decisions and it’s mode of entry (Ingram, Silverman 2002). MNEs have to decide whether to go as a first or late mover and due to what kind of motivation they decide to do FDIs in China. In countries with a weak institutional framework, Meyer et al. (2009) find that MNEs should choose the Joint Venture FDI mode of entry, or if local resources are not needed, Greenfield. While China holds many restrictions on FDIs, several industries enjoy a certain level of liberty when operating in China. If the research of Meyer et al. (2009) is correct, then MNEs in China should have made entry mode decisions that reflect this. 2.2. Research Contribution
My research contributes as a test, whether...

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