Environment and Corporate Culture

In: Business and Management

Submitted By arujrahim
Words 486
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THE ENVIRONMENT & CORPORATE CULTURE........
The environment and corporate culture can be best studied by taking an example of a corporate culture. My case study revolves around
Nestle group is a multinational food company and headquartered in Vevey, Switzerland, and listed on the SWX Swiss Exchange with turnover of over 87 billion Swiss francs. Nestle group has transformed its organisation from Food and Beverage business to the world recognized leader in nutrition, health and wellness through global business strategy. Nestle is the largest food company who are competing with companies of Unilever Nv(UN), one of Nestlé’s big competitors, followed by Kraft Foods(KFT), Group Danone (DA), Cadbury Schweppes(CSG) and Hershry Foods(HSY).
GENERAL ENVIRONMENT
INTERNATIONAL
Based on the theories of international business, three motivations are generally addressed for MNC to go to aboard which are raw material seekers, cost minimisers, market seekers. Apply those theories to Nestle; market seeker would be the Nestlé’s originated motivation to expand internationally since Nestle heavy invest in foreign countries, produce and sell products and services in foreign markets, and around 98% of its group sales are taken places at the overseas. (Shapiro 1992).
Technological – The last part of the twentieth century was the influx of IT capital investment in Europe. This rise in IT spending which concerns the sale of hardwares, software, and related internal and external services, plus telecommunication has improved the efficiency of distribution channels between the seller and the final customer. It also contributed to the enhancement of computer information systems of companies, especially those that operate in an industry that rely deeply on R&D.

* Economic - 1995 was the start of implementing environmental taxes on different sectors of the European economy.…...

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