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Environmental Issues and Schools of Thought

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Environmental Issues and Schools of Thought An environmental issue greatly affecting the Florida Gulf Coast counties are the protection of the shores and beaches. Through recent years there have been oil spills in the gulf that have threatened numerous environments, endangered species, as well as hurt the tourism industry. The most threatening spill was the famous BP oil spill of 2010. This spill devastated numerous species of wildlife and hurt businesses for years. Although this is an ongoing threat, the greedy oil industry is still pushing for more offshore drilling which is forcing activists of all organizations to step up and fight their plans for more drilling. There two schools of thought that should be taken into account for people dealing with this issue. The first is pluralism. The state's elected leaders need to see both sides to this issue so they can vote and make an elected decision. If they were to see both sides to this environmental problem then they could come up with a strategy to have both sides agree to the plan. Without the idea of pluralism there would be no way to understand all aspects of this issue. The other school of thought relative to this issue is ethical extensionism, which means that all things in nature should be extended moral standing. People with this view will this these animals that have no say in the matter, but should be thought of in any decisions made. They are just as important to Florida's coast as humans are to the boating and tourism industry. They are part of the environmental circle, and they need to be given a chance to survive. Humans have to take precautions to save the vital ecosystem along our coasts, and that would mean taking all living things into account. There are so many different philosophies and beliefs by people that environmental issues will always be around. There will always be an activist...

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