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Erikson’s First Four Stages of Personality Development

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Erikson’s First Four Stages of Personality Development
Jeff Brown
ECE 335: Children’s Literature
Instructor: Jamie Worthington
May 5 2011

Erikson’s Stages of Personality Development
This paper will discuss Erik Erikson’s first four stages of development of a young child, and four literacy literature that coincide with each of Erikson’s four stages of child development. One of Erikson’s most significant contributions to developmental theory is the emphasis he placed on the relationship of society and the interpersonal experience to the unfolding of personality. Erikson integrates these developmental ideas into his theory encompassing an overview of the human life cycle. Erikson’s first stage consists of trust versus mistrust. This stage begins from birth up to 18 months old. This is the stage when the child is at its most vulnerable. It’s also wholly depended on whoever it is that is to provide him with everything he requires to sustain himself through this first stage. This provider is also going to be who this child is going to adapt to as long as the provider provides for this child. When the provider stops providing the child’s needs, the child will begin to mistrust the provider, because the child can no longer trust the provider. The book that coincide with this stage would be The Happy Book: Touch & Feel Fun for Every Little One by Diane Muldrow is a book of rhyming text and colorful illustrations that includes pages with touch and feel textures, scratch-and-sniff scents, glow-in-the dark surprises, and lift-the-flap messages. It’s designed to lift up the child’s feelings (Blessed to be . . ., n. d.). Erikson’s second stage consists of autonomy versus shame and doubt. This stage is from the toddler’s age of 18 months to 3 years old. This is when the child starts demanding his independence. The child begins to do things the way he wants to do them....

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