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Essay On Global Poverty

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Global Poverty

1) What exactly is the problem, and why do you believe this to be so important?
State of being extremely poor
People don't have enough food
People are starving
Illness
No education allows for them to be stuck where there are and have a very difficult time getting out of it. They can not get jobs because no one wants to hire them

2) In what way is the problem a regional issue? (Is this problem unique to a part of the world or is it global?)
This problem is global
Half of the population is living in poverty
More than 3 billion people live on less than $2.50 a day
More than 1.3 billion people live on $1.25 a day
1 billion children worldwide live in poverty (one in two children)
22,000 children die each year as a result of poverty
…show more content…
Even though poverty has been reduced in some areas, it is still a major problem that's to be addressed and solved.
The government as well as their citizens need to help out and give back to the community.
The UN could help raise funds to give to countries stricken with poverty.

Child Soldiers

1) What exactly is the problem, and why do you believe this to be so important?
Child soldiers are any children under the age of 18 who are recruited by a state or non-state armed group and used as fighters, cooks, suicide bombers, human shields, messengers, spies, or for sexual purposes.
When a child soldier comes back from war, their mental state is not where it was when they left. They could have been sexually abused and this could causes PTSD or other illness
Their childhood is gone and ruined forever. The memories they will have will be the ones from war such as witnessing deaths and being put in horrific situations.

2) In what way is the problem a regional issue? (Is this problem unique to a part of the world or is it global?)
The use of children as soldiers is most prevalent in countries torn by conflict in Africa, as well as in Afghanistan, Burma and Colombia according to the United

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