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Essay Whether Russia Democratic Country

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By faq06
Words 264
Pages 2
Long since the Russian people got used to the iron hand. For example in the 16-17th centuries there was an authoritarian government according to which all population of the country were the tsar's lieges. The totalitarian regime remained also in modern time, for example, during Stalin's rule. Only in 1990 Russia came to the democratic power, but is it really like that? For instance, I am as the citizen, provided with all rights necessary for me, and the duties imposed on me are fair. But why duties often are not carried out, and the rights are not fulfilled? Here we approach a question how far the power in Russia effective and fair. Considering this issue , whether Russia really the democratic state, rises a question – what exactly that stipulated in the Constitution are observed in reality? Instantly various examples, cases when the rights of citizens were not considered, start occurring to my mind. So far Russia is the democratic state only on paper, and in reality, we endure "transition period" which is characterized by instability of democratic priorities in our country. Therefore it is possible to say that the power demands too much from the citizens, but gives nothing instead. Moreover, I can virtually tell with certainty that we - Russians will suffer any lawlessness on the part of the government for a long time. Unfortunately , we live this way , we got used to do it. This is a part of our mentality. And even when something dissatisfies us we only sigh and say : "well, let it be, tomorrow is a new, better day".

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