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JPPSS ELA COURSE GUIDE
2011-2012

ENGLISH I

The JPPSS Instructional Sequence Guides are aligned with the LA Comprehensive Curriculum.
JPPSS
Implementation of Activities in the Classroom Incorporation of activities into lesson plans is critical to the successful implementation of the Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum. The Comprehensive Curriculum indicates one way to align instruction with Louisiana standards, benchmarks, and grade-level expectations. The curriculum is aligned with state content standards, as defined by grade-level expectations (GLEs), and organized into coherent, time-bound units with sample activities and classroom assessments to guide teaching and learning. The units in the curriculum have been arranged so that the content to be assessed will be taught before the state testing dates. While teachers may substitute equivalent activities and assessments based on the instructional needs, learning styles, and interests of their students, the Comprehensive Curriculum should be a primary resource when planning instruction. Grade level expectations—not the textbook—should determine the content to be taught. Textbooks and other instructional materials should be used as resource in teaching the grade level expectations. Lesson plans should be designed to introduce students to one or more of the activities, to provide background information and follow-up, and to prepare students for success in mastering the Grade-Level Expectations associated with the activities. Lesson plans should address individual needs of students and should include processes for re-teaching concepts or skills for students who need additional instruction. Appropriate accommodations must be made for students with disabilities.

|English I |
|Unit |Title |LCC Approximate Time |JPPSS Approximate |
| | | |Time |
|1 |Short Story |6 Wks. |3 Wks. |
|2 |Nonfiction |6 Wks. |3 Wks. |
|3 |Poetry |4 Wks. |2 Wks. |
|4 |Drama |5 Wks. |2.5 Wks. |
|5 |The Novel |6 Wks. |3 Wks. |
|6 |The Epic |5 Wks. |2.5 Wks. |

|HIGH SCHOOL Two Intervals (semester courses) Testing Window |
|Interval 1 |September 26, 2011 – September 30, 2011 |
|FALL | |
|Interval 2 |November 14, 2011 – November 18, 2011 |
|FALL | |
|Interval 1 |February 13, 2012- February 17, 2012 |
|SPRING | |
|Interval 2 |April 16, 2012-April 20, 2012 |
|SPRING |(Statewide testing will not affect ELA or Math courses and |
| |therefore does not present a scheduling conflict.) |

|HOLT TEXTBOOK INFORMATION |
|At the time of the initial textbook adoption, schools were provided with student textbooks and teacher resources from district funds according to student |
|enrollment and teacher count. Unfortunately our office does not have the funds for replacement of these items. Please check with your school in regard to the |
|resources. Should a school now require additional textbooks and/or teacher resources, these should be purchased using the school’s funds. Please contact our Holt |
|representative-Michael Sims. |
| | |
|LANGUAGE HOLT Elements of Language-Textbook Resources |LITERATURE HOLT Elements of Literature-Textbook Resources |
|Student Resources: |Student Resources: |
|Student Textbook |Student Textbook |
|Think as a Writer Interactive Workbook ( consumable) for the life of adoption |The Holt Reader Selection (Workbook) (consumable)for the life of adoption |
|Louisiana Test Prep ( consumable) for the life of adoption |LA Test Prep Workbook (consumable) for the life of adoption 9th& 10th |
|Teaching Resources (one per teacher) |LA Practice and Enrichment Booklet (non-consumable) |
|Textbook –Teacher’s Edition |Holt Leveled Library 9th & 10th (one time only) |
|Teacher One-Stop Planner dvd with Test Generator |Teaching Resources (one per teacher) |
|Student One-Stop Planner dvd |Textbook –Teacher’s Edition |
|Grammar Notes cd |One-Stop Planner CD-ROM with Test Generator |
|Interactive Speller cd |The Holt Reader /Teacher’s Manual |
|Wordsharp cd |Six Traits for Writing Booklet |
|Writing Notes cd |Audio CD Library |
|Writing & Research in a Digital Age dvd |Daily Language Activities |
|Professional Learning dvd |Vocabulary Development |
|WriteSmart cd |Workshop Resources: Writing, Listening, and Speaking |
|Assessment Chapter Tests |Holt Adapted Reader/ Answer Key |
|Assessment Chapter Tests in Standardized Format |Holt Multicultural Reader/Teacher’s Guide |
|Daily Language Transparencies |Holt Reader Solutions |
|Teaching Strategies for English Language Learners |Holt Assessment: Literature, Reading, and Vocabulary |
|Vocabulary Workshop/ Answer Key |Internet Resources at http//: go.hrw.com (code required) |
|Developmental Language Skills, Teacher's Notes/Answer Key | |
|Internet Resources at www.thinkcentral.com (code required) | |
|ELEMENTS of LANGAUGE |ELEMENTS of LITERATURE |
|Student Edition Prices Include: |Student Edition Prices Include: |
|Grade 9:- Third Course: $66.95 |Grade 9:- Third Course: $76.95 |
|Think As a Writer Interactive |Holt Reader (consumable) $11.15 |
|Worktext (consumable) $12.20 |LA Test Prep workbook |
| |(consumable) $11.15 |
| |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet 5.50 |
| |
|Michael Sims |
|Holt McDougal Service Rep |
|504 610-0663 |
|Michael.sims@hmhpub.com |
|http://customercare.hmhco.com |
|Customer service 800 462-6595 |
| |

|JPPSS ENGLISH I INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE GUIDE |
|LCC may be accessed@ |
|http://www.louisianaschools.net/topics/comprehensive_curriculum.html |
|Content Area Literacy Strategies (view literacy strategy descriptions) are an integral part of LCC activities. Content Literacy Strategies Interactive |
|http://www.vrml.k12.la.us/cc/18str/18str.htm. Blackline Masters (BLMs) http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ for each course are provided |
|to assist in the delivery of activities or to assess student learning. The teacher should preview websites before students access them. |
| |
|INTERVAL ASSESSMENT |
|Each Interval Assessment is an integrated reading, writing, using information resources test that is in the End of Course Test format. |
| |
|Interval Assessment 1 (Fall – Week of Sept 26) or (Spring – Week of Feb 14). |
|Interval Assessment 2 (Fall – Week of Nov 14) or (Spring –Week of Apr 16). |
|FIRST TERM will cover LCC UNITS 1, 2, and 3. |
|FALL (Aug 15-Oct 14) |
|SPRING (Jan 6-Mar 14) |
| |
|ONGOING: Independent Reading & Vocab Study (context clues-definition, example, |ONGOING: Daily Language Activities: Proofreading Warm-ups, Vocabulary, Analogies,|
|restatement or contrast; connotative/denotative meanings; Greek, Latin, |Sentence Combining, Critical Reading Holt Daily Language Activities is a notebook|
|Anglo-Saxon roots/word parts; etymology) |of transparencies that reinforce skills in reading, writing, grammar, usage, and |
| |mechanics that are covered in the textbook selections. |
|ONGOING: Using Dictionary & Library Skills - key word searches; | |
|paraphrases/summaries; dictionary skills; library resources(encyclopedias, |ONGOING: Writing about Literature : Book Reports, Reviews, or Literary Elements |
|atlases, library catalogs, specialized dictionaries, almanacs, technical |Holt Literature: pp. 630-641 Focus: brief summary of work/passage; writer’s |
|encyclopedias, and periodicals); bibliographic format and/or works cited list; |thoughts & feelings about it & why it produces such a reaction; support of |
|interpreting graphic aids; study guides, SQRRR, & QAR |examples/quotations to show what is being responded to; compare & contrast of |
| |literary elements/devices |
|ONGOING: Critical Thinking Skills in Reading -sequence events & steps in a |Holt Elements of Literature, Third Course © 2007 |
|process; summarize and paraphrase information; identify stated or implied main |Holt Elements of Language, Third Course © 2009 |
|ideas & supporting details; compare & contrast literary elements/ideas; make | |
|simple inferences and draw conclusions; predict the outcome of a story or | |
|situation; and identify literary devices (foreshadowing, flashback, simile, | |
|metaphor, mixed metaphors, implied metaphors, sarcasm/irony, imagery, | |
|onomatopoeia, hyperbole, personification, oxymoron) | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
|READING : Organizational Procedural Activities Administer/Model: Reading |ENGLISH: Organizational Procedural Activities Administer/Model: Writing Interest|
|Interest Inventory, Reading Strategy Survey, Reading Skills Pretest (Gates |Inventory, Baseline Writing Assessment w/EOC Rubric |
|MacGinitie), Textbook Analysis (organizational features of text), Cooperative |http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hswriting/ |
|Group Structures & Process, Reading Log |Teacher Modeling of Daily Edit/Proofreading Process, Reading/Writing Portfolio |
|http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hsreading/ |Creation Writing Overview & Basic Writing Craft Skills |
|Content Literacy Strategies Interactive |Holt Six Traits Booklet: Writing Process - 6-Traits of Effective Writing: Idea |
|http://www.vrml.k12.la.us/cc/18str/18str.htm. |Development, Organization, Voice, Word Choice, Sentence Fluency, Conventions |

|SHORT STORY/NOVEL Time Frame: Approximately weeks |
|LCC UNIT 1: The Short Story- This unit focuses on reading and responding to a variety of short stories, both classic and contemporary, and applying a variety of |
|reading and comprehension strategies. The development of compositions that interpret and analyze short story elements and the use of self-assessment and peer |
|review to edit preliminary drafts and produce final products are essential elements of this unit. Written responses to a variety of writing prompts in a |
|journal/learning log; grammar instruction differentiated for students’ specific needs; independent reading instruction and monitoring; definition of vocabulary |
|words within the context of the literature and appropriate use of the words in self-generated sentences; and listing of important literary terms are ongoing. |
|Students can identify characteristics that are unique to the short story genre. They recognize that literary devices enhance the meaning of a literary work, and |
|that employing literary devices in written work and group projects will likewise enhance student work. It is the reader’s task to draw inferences for |
|himself/herself from the story and to relate those inferences to personal experience(s). Students will recognize, identify, and distinguish various text structures|
|and forms, including extended passages of fiction and extended fiction. Students will interpret and analyze literary devices. |
|Elements of Fiction: plot & plot structure; character & characterization; setting; time shifts; sequence clues; cause-effect relationships; point of view; theme; |
|dialogue; mood; flashback/foreshadowing; conflict/complications /resolution; making inferences ; conclusions; generalizations; predictions; author’s purpose; |
|author’s viewpoint |
| |
|Reading Fiction: Short Stories |
|Holt Literature: pp. 1-3; pp. 4-15; pp.16-37; pp. 60-61; pp.62-78; pp. 96-97; pp.98-107; pp. 108-117; pp.16-137; |
|pp. 140-152; pp. 172-187; pp. 188- 196; pp.197-209; pp. 210-220; pp. pp. 246-247; pp. 248-259; pp. 261-271; pp. |
|272-280; pp. 336-347; pp. 348-358; pp. 359-369; pp. 404 413; pp. 414-429; pp. 436-445; pp. 572-573; pp. 574-579; |
|pp. 580-597; pp. 607-622 |

|Holt Elements of Literature correlation to the LA Comprehensive Curriculum |
|Elements of Literature, Third |Selection Title |Skill/Literary Focus |SE pages |GLEs |
|Course © 2007 | | | | |
|Collection 1 |Initiation |Plot |4-15 |2b, 3d, 3e |
| |The Most Dangerous Game |Making Predictions/ Foreshadowing |16-37 |1b, 2b, 3e, 11f |
| |Dog Star |Sequencing/ Flashback |44-54 |1d, 2b, 3d, 3e, 8a |
| |A Christmas Memory |Reading for Details/ Setting |62-76 |2a, 2c, 5, 17a, 20c, |
| | | | |23b |
|Collection 2 |Harrison Bergeron |Character |98-107 |2a |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| |Thank You, M’am |Making Inferences/ Dialogue |108-117 |4b, 5, 11e |
| |Helen on Eighty-sixth Street |Allusions/Character Traits |126-137 |2c, 8a, 20c |
| |Marigolds |Making Inferences/ Conflict |140-152 |2b, 4b, 5, 11e |
| |Skills Review |Character Traits |162-165 |2b, 2c |
|Collection 3 |Full Circles |Narrator and Voice |172-187 |2c |
| | | | | |
| |The Interlopers |Monitoring your Reading/Narrator |188-196 |1a, 5, 11a, 20c |
| |The Necklace |Summarizing/Point of View |197-209 |11a, 20a, 20b, 23d |
| |The Cask of Amontillado |Drawing Conclusions/ Narrator |210-220 |1b, 1d, 4b, 11e, 17b, |
| | | | |17d, 20b |
| |Skills Review |Narrator and Voice |240-241 |2c |
|Collection 4 |Disguises |Theme |248-259 |9e |
| |Comparing Universal Themes: |Making Predictions/ Theme and Conflict |260-280 |1d, 2a, 2b, 3d, 4b, 5,|
| |The Sniper and |Making Inferences/ Theme and Character | |6, 8a, 10c, 11a, 11c, |
| |Cranes | | |11e, 11f, 17b |
| |Skills Review |Compare Themes |328-329 |5, 11c |
|Collection 5 |Poison |Irony and Ambiguity |336-347 |3f |
| |The Gift of the Magi |Making Predictions/Irony |348-358 |3f, 5, 6, 7, 11f |
| |The Lady, or the Tiger? |Making Inferences/ Ambiguity |356-369 |4b |
|Collection 6 |The Osage Orange Tree |Symbol |404-413 |3c, 9e |
| |The Scarlet Ibis |Making Inferences/ Symbols |414-429 |3c, 4b, 8a, 11e, 17a, |
| | | | |20b |
| |The Golden Kite, the Silver Wind|Cause and Effect/ Allegory |436-445 |1b, 5, 7, 8a, 9e, 14a,|
| | | | |20a |
|Collection 8 |Caline |Style |574-579 |3b |
| |A Sound of Thunder |Cause and Effect/ Figurative Language and Mood |580-597 |1b, 1d, 4b, 8a, 9e, |
| | | | |14a |
| |To Da-duh, in Memoriam |Visualizing/ Diction and Sentence Patterns |607-622 |1c, 2c, 8a |
| |Skills Review |Diction, Figurative Language, tone and mood |638-639 |2a, 3b |
|Collection 9 |The Old Demon |Biographical and Historical Approaches |646-659 |7 |
| |American History |Summarizing/ Biographical and Historical Approach |660-673 |7, 8a, 11a, 13 |
| |Beware of the Dog |Making Inferences/ Historical Setting |686-704 |2c, 4a, 4b, 7, 11a, |
| | | | |11e, 13, 40d |
|Holt Reader |Crime on Mars (Science Fiction) |Making Predictions/ Plot and Flashback |38-49 | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| |The White Umbrella |Making Inferences/ Character |63-77 | |
| |My Delicate Heart Condition |Drawing Conclusions/ Narrator |92-105 | |
| |The Moustache |Making Inferences/ Theme and Genre |121-137 | |
| |August Heat |Drawing Conclusions/ Ambiguity |152-163 | |
| |The Skull and the Arrow |Cause and Effect/ Allegory |187-197 | |
| |The Blue Jar |Visualizing/Style |240-247 | |
| |The House Guest |Making Inferences/ Historical Context |266-279 | |
|Holt Multi-Cultural Reader |My Horse |Making Predictions/Plot and Conflict |4-13 | |
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
| |Music Lady |Visualizing/ Setting and Mood |14-23 | |
| |The One Who Watches |Making Inferences/ Dialogue |46-61 | |
| |Mr. Shaabi |Read for Details/ Point of View |81-89 | |
| |Three Wise Guys |Making Predictions/Irony |126-137 | |
| |Hurdles |Cause and Effect/ Irony |138-143 | |
| |The Memory Stone |Making Inferences/ Historical Approach |218-229 | |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 1: Independent Reading –Ongoing |GLE |GLE/RESOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen/paper, reading log, high interest, multi-level young adult novels |01a. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
|Holt Leveled Libraries | |variety of strategies, including use of context |
|The teacher should facilitate independent reading of student-selected novels by providing time for | |clues (ELA-1-H1) |
|Sustained Silent Reading (SSR) daily. (A portion of this time may be dedicated to reading aloud | |Language: p. 545, 614, 650, 774, 875 |
|from engaging texts. This practice may be especially important if students are reluctant readers or| |Literature: pp. 166, 196, |
|are not accustomed to reading independently for sustained periods of time.) The teacher should | | |
|monitor this reading, making sure to incorporate both oral and written response to the text. | | |
|Responses may be initiated through a variety of strategies, including response logs, dialogue | | |
|letters or journals/learning logs, informal discussions at the end of SSR, and book talks. Whatever| | |
|the strategy or combination of strategies, students must go beyond summarizing in their responses if| | |
|they are to meet the GLEs listed above. These GLEs may be genre specific, but they are not meant to| | |
|restrict student choice or to require the teacher to design special focus lessons to accommodate | | |
|that student choice. The teacher may facilitate reflection at the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy| | |
|through written response to individual students, teacher-student conferences, and/or whole-class | | |
|questioning techniques. Lists of the works students have read should be maintained and monitored | | |
|via a reading log. | | |
| |02a. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
| | |author’s use of direct and indirect characterization|
| | |(ELA-1-H2) |
| | |Literature: pp. 94-97, 164-165 |
| |02b. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
| | |author’s pacing of action and use of plot |
| | |development, subplots, parallel episodes, and climax|
| | |to impact the reader (ELA-1-H2) |
| | |Literature: Plot pp. 2-4 |
| | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet pp. 21-23 |
| |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including short stories and novels (ELA-6-H3)|
| | |Literature: pp. 593-596, 530-632 |
| |10c. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, a short story or novel |
| | |provides a vicarious life experience (ELA-6-H4) |
| | |Literature: pp. 296-301 |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including summarizing and paraphrasing |
| | |information and story elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| | |Language: 714-720 |
| | |Literature: 1102-1103, 1103-1104 |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making inferences and drawing |
| | |conclusions (ELA-7-H1) |
| | |Language: pp. 676-682, |
| | |Literature: 107, 108, 110, 112 |
| |13. |Identify and explain the impact of an author’s life |
| | |on themes and issues of a single text or multiple |
| | |texts by the same author (ELA-7-H3) |
| | |Literature: pp. 644-646 |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 2: Vocabulary Study - Ongoing |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: dictionaries, index cards, posters |01a. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
|http://www.myvocabulary.com/ | |variety of strategies, including use of context |
|http://www.word-detective.com/ | |clues (ELA-1-H1) |
| | |Language: pp. 545, 614, 650, 774, 875 |
|Following a teacher-facilitated introduction to the dictionary, students will keep a vocabulary list| |Literature: pp. 166, 196 |
|of new words (both student- and teacher-selected) encountered in reading short stories. For each | | |
|word, students will record the sentence in which the word was found and suggest a synonym. | | |
| | | |
|Periodically, they will verify that they have suggested an appropriate synonym by locating a | | |
|definition and using the word correctly in a self-generated sentence, paying special attention to | | |
|the use of detailed context that provides the necessary who, what, when, where, and why most | | |
|effective for the study of words. | | |
| | | |
|Students will, at the conclusion of the unit, select five words, research etymology, and illustrate | | |
|them on a poster or in another visual presentation. Finally, students will write a reflective | | |
|paragraph on a nonfiction selection incorporating at least one of the words studied and applying | | |
|standard rules of sentence formation, including avoiding run-ons and fragments and using all parts | | |
|of speech appropriately. | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| |01d. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
| | |variety of strategies, including tracing etymology |
| | |(ELA-1-H1) |
| | |Literature: pp. 816-817 |
| | |Language pp. 853-856 |
| |22a. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as fragments (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: pp. 478-485 |
| |22b. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as run-on sentences (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: pp. 485-487 |
| |23g. |Apply standard rules of usage, including using all |
| | |parts of speech appropriately (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: Usage pp. 49-51, 52-55, 56-59, 60-66, |
| | |67-73, 74-76, 77-78, 79-80 |
| |26. |Use a variety of resources, such as dictionaries, |
| | |thesauruses, glossaries, technology, and textual |
| | |features (e.g., definitional footnotes, sidebars) to|
| | |verify word spellings (ELA-3-H3) |
| | |Language: pp. 838-839 |
| | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet p. 14 |
| |Sample Vocabulary Chart |
| |Sentence in which word occurs (underline word) |
| |Text Title |
| |Synonym |
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| |2 |
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|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 3: Writing Prompts to Make Real-Life Connections and to Assess Understanding - |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
|Ongoing |# | |
|Materials List: pen, learning logs/notebooks, index cards |05. |Explain ways in which ideas and information in a |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-mscurriculum/ | |variety of texts (e.g., scientific reports, |
|HOLT Interactive Graphic Organizers @ http://my.hrw.com/nsmedia/intgos/html/igo.htm | |technical guidelines, business memos, literary |
|Holt Writing Models @ http://go.hrw.com/eolang/modbank/ | |texts) connect to real-life situations and other |
|HOLT Literature & Language Arts http://hlla.hrw.com/hlla/ | |texts (ELA-1-H4) |
| | |Language: pp. 563, 633-635, 795-796, 831-832 |
|Since writing is a process done in recursive stages, it is important that students receive | | |
|instruction in the writing craft through mini-lessons on target skills in descriptive and expository| | |
|writing. For this nonfiction unit, target skills should include writing compositions focusing on a | | |
|central idea with important ideas or events stated in a selected order, selecting an organizational | | |
|pattern (comparison/contrast, order of importance, chronological order) appropriate to the topic, | | |
|using elaboration techniques (anecdotes, relevant facts, examples, and/or specific details), and | | |
|using transitions to unify ideas and points. Students should keep a writer’s notebook or learning | | |
|log. In teaching students writing craft, the teacher should first show them how accomplished writers| | |
|use a particular skill, and then encourage students to emulate those writers. | | |
| | | |
|Teacher will begin preparing the students to become good writers. Each writing workshop should | | |
|begin with a mini lesson. Establish the writing process as the basis for instruction. It’s always | | |
|writing process first, then the traits. Traits and the writing process fit together naturally. The | | |
|pre-writing phase of the traits is the perfect place to hammer home the importance of Ideas. The | | |
|teacher should help students generate ideas with any number of brainstorming techniques. When the | | |
|right topic and information has been generated, the student will do better. Drafting helps the | | |
|writer apply organization, word choice and sentence fluency to the first rush of ideas and voice. | | |
|Responding is enhanced by a traits based vocabulary that sharpens and enhances revision. When | | |
|students understand the language and criteria of traits, they have a variety of ways into the | | |
|revision process. Simply checking conventions and making a neat copy gives way to revision based on | | |
|all the traits. | | |
|Multiple response sessions may be needed, since the teacher will want to limit the response to one | | |
|trait at a time. Too much feedback will only confuse a writer. It's always better to keep the | | |
|feedback short and focused on one strength and one area for improvement. | | |
|Editing for conventions helps prepare the piece for formal assessment and publication, which ends | | |
|the writing cycle. | | |
|Teacher should teach or review the traits for effective writing. Students will learn the traits of | | |
|writing through the Writing Craft Mini-Lessons. Compare strong & weak writing examples for each | | |
|trait. Provide ample practice rewriting weak samples into strong samples. Have students score sample| | |
|papers. The 6+1 Trait® Writing analytical model for assessing and teaching writing is made up of | | |
|6+1 key qualities that define strong writing. These are: | | |
|Ideas, the main message; | | |
|Organization, the internal structure of the piece; | | |
|Voice, the personal tone and flavor of the author's message; | | |
|Word Choice, the vocabulary a writer chooses to convey meaning; | | |
|Sentence Fluency, the rhythm and flow of the language; | | |
|Conventions, the mechanical correctness; | | |
|Presentation, how the writing actually looks on the page. | | |
|Examples of typical mini lessons could include: word choice, usage, or conventions; techniques for | | |
|organizing; kinds of writings for students to try; writing as a process; pieces of writing that | | |
|demonstrate different techniques. Teacher should teach or review the traits for effective writing. | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|The teacher will create SPAWN prompts as students prepare to learn new information or reflect on | | |
|what has been learned. SPAWN (view literacy strategy descriptions) is an acronym that stands for | | |
|five categories of writing options (Special Powers, Problem Solving, Alternatives Viewpoints, What | | |
|If?, and Next). Using these categories, the teacher can create numerous thought-provoking and | | |
|meaningful prompts. This kind of writing usually calls for students to anticipate what will be | | |
|learned that day. | | |
|Additionally, the teacher may have students write learning log/journal entries to prompts (or ask | | |
|questions) related to this topic: Connect an aspect of the story to prior knowledge or real-life | | |
|experiences or related text (e.g., as an initiation/motivational activity, a check-for-understanding| | |
|activity during reading and discussion, or a summative activity/assessment). | | |
| | | |
|Along with using learning logs, students may respond to prompts on entrance cards, “Stop and | | |
|Writes,” and exit cards (writing-for-understanding strategies). They will then either submit the | | |
|response to the teacher for assessment or discuss the response with the whole class as initiation, | | |
|comprehension, or closure activities. | | |
|Prompts should address comprehension and reasoning skills, higher-order thinking, and connections | | |
|between text and real-life experiences. Prompts can be used to begin discussions or for assessments.| | |
|During discussion, students use active listening strategies. Students should be encouraged to | | |
|identify strong insight provided by peers. | | |
| | | |
| |10c. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, a short story or novel |
| | |provides a vicarious life experience (ELA-6-H4) |
| | |Literature pp. 296-301 |
| |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
| | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| | |Language pp. 680-681 |
| |21d. |Write for various purposes, including text-supported|
| | |interpretations that connect life experiences to |
| | |works of literature (ELA-2-H6) |
| | |Literature: pp. 556-559, 630-633, 1040-1043, |
| | |1109-1114 |
| |32a. |Use active listening strategies, including |
| | |monitoring messages for clarity (ELA-4-H4) |
| | |Literature p. 1051 |
| |32b. |Use active listening strategies, including selecting|
| | |and organizing essential information Literature: |
| | |pp. 392-393 |
| |35a. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including identifying the strengths and talents of |
| | |other participants (ELA-4-H6) |
| | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet pp. 21-23 |
| |Six Traits PowerPoint |
| |http://classroom.jc-schools.net/daleyl/6_Traits1.ppt |
| |Six Traits websites |
| |http://educationnorthwest.org/traits |
| |http://www.writingfix.com/ |
| |http://www.edina.k12.mn.us/concord/teacherlinks/sixtraits/sixt|
| |raits.html |
| |http://6traits.cyberspaces.net/ |
| |Write Source: Student Models: |
| |http://thewritesource.com/models.htm |
| | |
| |Sample SPAWN prompts |
| | |
| |The following prompts might be developed for a study of Harper|
| |Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird |
| |Pre-reading: |
| |S - Special Powers |
| |When Scout complains about her teacher, Atticus tells her, |
| |“You never really understand a person until you consider |
| |things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin |
| |and walk around in it.” If you had the power, with whom would|
| |you trade places? |
| |W - What If? |
| |At the beginning of the novel, Scout Finch says, “When enough |
| |years had gone by to enable us to look back on them, we |
| |sometimes discussed the events leading up to [Jem’s] |
| |accident.” What if you could go back and change one event in |
| |your life? Which event would you change and why? |
| |During Reading: |
| |A - Alternative Viewpoints |
| |Atticus insists to the jury, “There is one way in this country|
| |in which all men are created equal…That institution, |
| |gentlemen, is a court.” Do you agree with Atticus? Are the |
| |courts today “the great levelers,” making us all equal, or do |
| |wealth and race play a role in the way justice is distributed |
| |in America? |
| |After reading |
| |P - Problem Solving |
| |After reading To Kill a Mockingbird, what can you say about |
| |both the compassion and prejudice of some people in Alabama? |
| |What made Alabama the perfect setting for civil rights |
| |struggles? |
| |N-Next |
| |What if Tom Robinson had not been killed after his conviction?|
| |What do you think would have happened if Atticus had brought |
| |his case before a higher court of appeals? Explain why you |
| |feel he would have won or lost. |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| |Stop and Talk, Write, Highlight, Draw |
| |Addresses the Cognitive and Knowledge-Building Domains. |
| |These four instructional tools can stand alone or be used in |
| |any combination with each other. Each one involves a different|
| |way of interacting with the text to enhance comprehension. |
| |Stop and Talk= Students stop reading and discuss with a |
| |partner or group whether they agree or disagree with what they|
| |are reading. |
| |Stop and Write=Students stop reading and write down new |
| |information. |
| |Stop and Highlight=Students stop reading and highlight |
| |everything they understand in one color and everything they |
| |DON'T understand in a different color. |
| |Stop and Draw=Students stop reading and draw what they are |
| |picturing in their minds |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 4: Grammar/Usage Mini-Lessons—Ongoing |GLEs: 22a, 22b, 22c, 24a, 24b, 24d, 25 |
|Materials List: writing samples |
|Grammar Guide: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/ |
| |
|The teacher will facilitate a classroom discussion at the beginning of class period or activity on sentence formation problems (i.e., fragments, run-ons, or syntax|
|problems,) or standard rules of usage or mechanics (i.e., capitalization for names of political and ethnic groups, religions, and continents; use of colons |
|preceding a list and after a salutation in a business letter; correct spelling conventions). Discussion will be based on the common errors in student writing |
|samples. The mini-lesson activities (which will be ongoing and skill-specific) will incorporate any text which features rhetorically significant use of the |
|grammar/usage being taught and student-generated writings. Ideally, the mini-lessons will become differentiated for students’ specific needs and will be |
|integrated within student writing assignments and not taught in isolation. |
|This lesson plan was adapted from Angela Petit's "The Stylish Semicolon: Teaching Punctuation as Rhetorical Choice." English Journal 92.3 (January 2003): 66-72. |
| |
|Sample Mini-lesson |
| |
|The teacher will explain the use of semicolons and ask students to explore Dr. King's use of semicolons and their rhetorical significance in "Letter from |
|Birmingham Jail.” Any text that features rhetorically significant use of semicolons could be used. Then, students will apply the lesson to their own writing by |
|searching for ways to follow Dr. King's model and use the punctuation mark in their own writing. |
| |
| |
| |
|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 5: Understanding Conflict |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, learning logs notebooks, chart paper or poster board, short story with emphasis|02b. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
|on conflict | |author’s pacing of action and use of plot |
|Holt Literature: Connell, Richard, “The Most Dangerous Game” pp. 17-34; Munro, H.H., “The | |development, subplots, parallel episodes, and climax|
|Interlopers” pp. 189-193 | |to impact the reader (ELA-1-H2) |
| | |Literature: Plot pp. 2-3, 4 |
|Students will write a learning log entry based on this prompt: Describe a conflict recently | | |
|experienced and how it was resolved. After a class discussion of individual experiences, the | | |
|teacher will identify and discuss conflicts (e.g., man against man, man against self, man against | | |
|society, man against nature) in short stories. The teacher will then assist the class in creating a | | |
|chart classifying student conflicts according to conflicts taught. After reading a short story (see | | |
|suggestions below), students will identify the type of conflict they consider the most important in | | |
|the story and attempt to discover instances where the conflict relates to a life experiences | | |
|(perhaps from the chart). Finally, using evidence from the story as support, students will write an| | |
|essay comparing the conflict identified in the story to a personal conflict applying standard rules | | |
|of usage including appropriate subject-verb agreement and appropriate use of parts of speech. | | |
| | | |
|*Other stories with an emphasis on conflict: | | |
|Glaspell, Susan, A Jury of Her Peers -- Full Text | | |
|Ish-Kishor, Sulamith, Appointment with Love | | |
| | | |
| |04b. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including short stories/novels (ELA-1-H3) |
| | |Literature: Draw conclusions p. 210 |
| |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) - short stories and novels |
| | |(ELA-6-H3) |
| | |Literature: Theme pp. 246-247 |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including summarizing and paraphrasing |
| | |information and story elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| | |Language: 714-720 |
| | |Literature: 1102-1103, 1103-1104 |
| |21d. |Write for various purposes, including text-supported|
| | |interpretations that connect life experiences to |
| | |works of literature (ELA-2-H6) |
| | |Literature: pp. 556-559, 630-633, 1040-1043, |
| | |1109-1114 |
| |23a. |Apply standard rules of usage, including making |
| | |subjects and verbs agree (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: pp. 167-180, 188-189, |
| | |Literature: pp. 1160-1162 |
| |23g. |Apply standard rules of usage, including using all |
| | |parts of speech appropriately (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: Usage pp. 49-51, 52-55, 56-59, 60-66, |
| | |67-73, 74-76, 77-78, 79-80 |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 6: Plotting the Story |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: short story with emphasis on plot, graphic organizer |02b. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
|Plot Diagram - ReadWriteThink | |author’s pacing of action and use of plot |
|Plot Diagram | |development, subplots, parallel episodes, and climax|
| | |to impact the reader (ELA-1-H2) |
| | |Literature: Plot pp.2-3, 4, 1141, 1026 |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Holt Literature: Plot pp. 1-3; “ The Initiation” pp. 4-15; “The Necklace” pp. 198-206 | | |
| | | |
|The teacher will facilitate a review and discussion of the plot of a short story and will model | | |
|creating a flow chart of the major points of action. | | |
| | | |
|Students will work in cooperative groups or as a whole group (possibly using the same short story | | |
|that was examined in the conflict activity), to identify the main parts of plot (e.g., exposition, | | |
|inciting incident, development, climax, resolution, and denouement). Using this information, each | | |
|group will create a flow chart or some other graphic organizer of the plot sequence for the assigned| | |
|short story and present the flow chart to the class as a whole. | | |
| | | |
|*Other stories with an emphasis on plot structure: | | |
|Bambara, Toni Cade, “The Lesson” Bambara's "The Lesson" | | |
|Jackson, Shirley, "The Lottery" The Lottery--Shirley Jackson | | |
|Poe, Edgar Allan, "The Tell-Tale Heart” The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe | | |
| |04b. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including short stories/novels (ELA-1-H3) |
| | |Literature: pp. 592-596 |
| |11d. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including examining the sequence of |
| | |information and procedures in order to critique the |
| | |logic or development of ideas in texts (ELA-7-H1) |
| | |Literature: pp. 328-329 |
| |27. |Use standard English grammar, diction, and syntax |
| | |when responding to questions, participating in |
| | |informal group discussions, and making presentations|
| | |(ELA-4-H1) |
| | |Language: pp. 885-886, 887-890 |
| | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet p. 15 |
| |33. |Deliver clear, coherent, and concise oral |
| | |presentations about information and ideas in texts |
| | |(ELA-4-H4) |
| | |Language: pp. 669-670 |
| |35b. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including acting as facilitator, recorder, leader, |
| | |listener, or mediator (ELA-4-H6) |
| | |Language: pp. 889-80 |
| | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet pp. 21-23 |
| |Content Literacy Strategies Interactive |
| |http://www.vrml.k12.la.us/cc/18str/18str.htm |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 7: Character Analysis and Descriptive Composition |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, paper, short story with emphasis on characterization, Writer’s Checklist |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
|(http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/uploads/10109.pdf ) | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms |
|What is a character? | |and types, including short stories and novels |
|A person, machine, or animal who takes part in the action | |(ELA-6-H3) |
|Protagonist - the main character | |Content Literacy Strategies Interactive |
|Antagonist - the protagonist struggles against this other major character in some works | |http://www.vrml.k12.la.us/cc/18str/18str.htm |
|Characterization | | |
|The process of showing what a character is really like. | | |
|Direct characterization – the writer simply tells what the character is like. Such as “Susie felt | | |
|lonely and frightened.” | | |
|Indirect characterization – the writer shows what a character is like by describing what the | | |
|character says or does, how a character looks, or what other characters say about him or her | | |
|Elements of Character | | |
|Appearance – looks, clothing, etc | | |
|Personality – way the character acts | | |
|round –complex, many different traits | | |
|flat –simple, one or two traits | | |
|Background – Where is the character from? School? Experiences? | | |
|Motivation – Why do the character do what she does? What does he like or dislike? Goals, | | |
|aspirations, dreams, and needs? | | |
|Relationships – Who is the character related to? How does the character relate to other people? | | |
|Conflicts – Involved in a struggle? Internal or external? Why? | | |
|Change – Does the character change, learn or grow during the work? | | |
|static character – does not change | | |
|dynamic character - changes | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Holt Literature: “Harrison Bergeron” pp. 96-107; Thank You, “M’am & Mother to Son” pp. 108-117; | | |
|“Helen on Eighty-Sixth Street” pp. 126-137 | | |
|“Marigolds” pp. 140152 | | |
| | | |
|Students will create a modified word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) to aid in | | |
|discovering the shared and unique qualities of characters in a short story. Teachers should label | | |
|columns to meet lesson objectives. Students should insert information during reading of text. | | |
|Example: | | |
|Short Story Word Grid | | |
|(Character) | | |
|Physical Appearance | | |
|Personality Traits | | |
|Motivation | | |
|(What does he/she want?) | | |
|Result | | |
|(What does the character do to attain the goal?) | | |
| | | |
|Character #1 | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Character #2 | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Character #3 | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Upon reading (see suggestions below) and word grid completion, students will engage in | | |
|think-pair-share activity (complete map, discuss/revise with partner, and share responses). | | |
| | | |
|As a whole class, students will discuss responses and cite specific examples from the story as | | |
|support for each assertion. These ideas and notes will be used to develop a multiparagraph | | |
|expository composition that includes text-supported evidence to trace the development of a | | |
|student-selected character from the short story. As part of the writing process, students will | | |
|utilize a writer’s checklist (available at http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/uploads/10109.pdf ) for | | |
|peer and self-evaluation to revise and edit their compositions, focusing on employing correct verb | | |
|tense throughout. They will produce a final draft for publication. | | |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making inferences and |
| | |drawing conclusions (ELA-7-H1) |
| | |Language: pp. 676-682, |
| | |Literature: pp. 107, 108, 110, 112 |
| |18d. |Develop complex compositions using writing |
| | |processes, including conferencing (e.g., peer and |
| | |teacher) (ELA-2-H3) |
| | |Language: pp. 557. 590, 627, 661, 700, 749, 788, |
| | |824 |
| |18e. |Develop complex compositions using writing |
| | |processes, including revising for content and |
| | |structure based on feedback (ELA-2-H3) |
| | |Language: pp. 557-558, 590-591, 627-628 |
| |18f. |Develop complex compositions using writing |
| | |processes, including proofreading/editing to |
| | |improve conventions of language (ELA-2-H3) |
| | |Language: pp. 561, 594, 630, 665 |
| |23b. |Apply standard rules of usage, including using |
| | |verbs in appropriate tenses (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: pp. 203-208 |
| | |
| | |
| |Other stories with an emphasis on characterization: |
| |Bambara, Toni Cade, “Geraldine Moore, The Poet” |
| |Geraldine Moore the Poet by Toni Cade Bambara |
| |Jackson, Shirley, “The Possibility of Evil” [PDF] |
| |“The Possibility of Evil” Shirley Jackson |
| |O’Brien, Tim, “Where Have You Gone, Charming Billy?” |
| |Where Have You Gone Charming Billy |
| |Tan, Amy, “Two Kinds” |
| |Amy Tan: Two Kinds |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 8: Web Search and Note-Taking to Compare Fictional and “Real” Characters |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
|(GLEs: 11a, 11b, 36b, 37b, 38, 42b) |# | |
|Materials List: computers, split-page note taking form, index cards, Activity Checklist BLM, sample |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
|Web source citation | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | |strategies, including summarizing and paraphrasing |
| | |information and story elements (ELA-7-H1) Language: |
|The teacher will review steps of the research process, including evaluating usefulness of | |714-720 |
|information, using note cards, and documenting borrowed information. Students will access Web | |Literature: 1102-1103, 1103-1104 |
|sources to locate two reliable, valid sources with information about a real-life person comparable | | |
|to a fictional character from a short story. They will then take notes from the sources using a | | |
|split-page note taking format (view literacy strategy descriptions) in order to organize information| | |
|and ideas logically from multiple sources. | | |
|Sample Split-Page Notetaking: | | |
|Name: | | |
| | | |
|Period: | | |
| | | |
|Characteristics of ___ | | |
|(Fictional Person). | | |
|Characteristics of _____ | | |
|(Real Life Person) w/Source | | |
| | | |
|Strong Work Ethic | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Determined | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Humble | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Then students will summarize significant facts on note cards, provide a correct citation for each | | |
|Web source, and submit for teacher evaluation. | | |
| | | |
|*Research may be conducted in the school’s media center if computer access is limited. | | |
|Content Literacy Strategies Interactive http://www.vrml.k12.la.us/cc/18str/18str.htm | | |
| |11b. |Demonstrate understanding of information by |
| | |comparing and contrasting information in texts, |
| | |including televised news, news magazines, |
| | |documentaries, and online information (ELA-7-H1) |
| | |Language: pp. 636-638 |
| | |Literature: pp. 1032, 1065 |
| |36b. |Identify and use organizational features to locate |
| | |relevant information for research projects using a |
| | |variety of resources, including electronic texts |
| | |(e.g., database keyword searches, search engines, |
| | |e-mail addresses) (ELA-5-H1) |
| | |Language: pp. 730-731 |
| |37b. |Locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a |
| | |variety of resources, including electronic sources |
| | |(e.g., Web sites, databases) (ELA-5-H2) |
| | |Language: pp. 730-731 |
| |38. |Analyze the usefulness and accuracy of sources by |
| | |determining their validity (e.g., authority, |
| | |accuracy, objectivity, publication date, and |
| | |coverage) (ELA-5-H2) |
| | |Literature: pp. 674-675, 709-710 |
| |42b. |Give credit for borrowed information in research |
| | |reports following acceptable use policy, including |
| | |preparing bibliographies and/or works cited list |
| | |Language: pp. 731-734, 737-738 |
| | |Literature: 1069-1072 |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 9: Character Comparison Composition |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, paper, graphic organizer, Comparison Essay Rubric BLM |02a. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | |author’s use of direct and indirect characterization|
| | |(ELA-1-H2) |
|Using the information from Activity 8, the students will complete a visual illustration/graphic | |Literature: pp. 96-97, 98, 247, 270, 1134-1135 |
|organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions). | | |
|Using this information, students will develop a multiparagraph essay that compares the real-life | | |
|person to the fictional character. The essay should include the following: a clearly stated central| | |
|idea; logical organization; vocabulary selected to clarify meaning, create images, and set a tone; | | |
|and a correct citation for the Web sources. Students will follow steps in writing processes to | | |
|self-edit and peer edit, revise, and produce a final draft. They will then present and discuss the | | |
|comparisons. | | |
| | | |
|Graphic organizer of the comparison of the two characters as a prewriting activity | | |
|http://www.fcrr.org/curriculum/PDF/G2-3/2-3Comp_1.pdf | | |
|http://freeology.com/graphicorgs/ | | |
|Content Literacy Strategies Interactive http://www.vrml.k12.la.us/cc/18str/18str.htm | | |
| |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including short stories and novels (ELA-6-H3)|
| | |Literature: Theme pp. 246-247 |
| |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
| | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| | |Language: pp. 680-681 |
| | |Literature: pp. 38, 293, 446, 675 |
| |17b. |Develop complex compositions on student- or |
| | |teacher-selected topics that are suited to an |
| | |identified audience and purpose and that include |
| | |vocabulary selected to clarify meaning, create |
| | |images, and set a tone (ELA-2-H2) |
| | |Language : 778-779, 813-814 |
| | |Literature: pp. 160, 219, 267, 322 |
| |28a. |Select language appropriate to specific purposes and|
| | |audiences when speaking, including delivering |
| | |informational/book reports in class (ELA-4-H1) |
| | |Language: pp. 669-670 |
| | |Literature: 564-565 |
| | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet p. 16 |
| |33. |Deliver clear, coherent, and concise oral |
| | |presentations about information and ideas in texts |
| | |(ELA-4-H4) |
| | |Language: pp. 669-670 |
| | |Literature: pp.564-565 |
| |42b. |Give credit for borrowed information in |
| | |grade-appropriate research reports following |
| | |acceptable use policy, including preparing |
| | |bibliographies and/or works cited list (ELA-5-H5) |
| | |Language: pp. 731-734, 737-738 |
| | |Literature: pp. 715-716, 1069-1072 |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 10: Literary Element Poster Presentation |GLE |GLE/RESOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: short story with emphasis on literary device(s), posters, markers |03a. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | |devices, including mixed metaphors (ELA-1-H2) |
|HOLT Interactive Graphic Organizers @ http://my.hrw.com/nsmedia/intgos/html/igo.htm | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet p. 3 |
| | | |
|Holt Literature: Irony- “The Gift of the Magi” pp. 249-354; Symbolism-“The Scarlet Ibis” pp. 415-426| | |
|After reading a short story, students will work in cooperative groups to analyze and interpret a | | |
|self-selected literary element (e.g., theme, plot, characterization) or device (e.g., symbolism, | | |
|oxymoron, and flashback). They will create a visual representation of their analysis on a poster, | | |
|prepare and deliver an oral presentation/explanation of the poster, and fill out an evaluation form | | |
|for at least two peer presentations. As an ongoing activity, the class will begin a “word wall” | | |
|where they will post (on posters, bulletin board, or newsprint) each new literary term, along with | | |
|an abbreviated definition, that they encounter throughout the year. | | |
|Make a poster http://edu.glogster.com/ | | |
|* Other stories with an emphasis on literary devices: | | |
|Irony: Fisher, Rudolph, “Miss Cynthie” | | |
|Valenzuela, Luisa, “The Censors” | | |
|Vonnegut, Jr., Kurt, “The Lie” | | |
|Symbolism: Lessing, Doris, “Through the Tunnel” | | |
|Flashback: The Bet by Anton Chekhov | | |
| | | |
|Marine Corps Issue David McLean My father used to keep three | | |
| | | |
|Imagery: To Build a Fire, by Jack London | | |
| | | |
| |03d. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| | |devices, including flashback |
| | |(ELA-1-H2) |
| | |Literature: pp. 3, 44, 53, 250, 278, 1137 |
| |03h. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| | |devices, including oxymoron (ELA-1-H2) |
| | |LA Practice & Enrichment booklet p. 5 |
| |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including short stories and novels (ELA-6-H3)|
| | |Literature: pp. 97, 403, 436, 444, 469, 593-596, |
| | |630-632 |
| |32a. |Use active listening strategies, including |
| | |monitoring messages for clarity (ELA-4-H4) |
| | |Language: Speaking and Listening pp. 882-895 |
| |32b. |Use active listening strategies, including selecting|
| | |and organizing essential information (ELA-4-H4) |
| | |Language: Speaking and Listening pp. 882-895 |
| |33. |Deliver clear, coherent, and concise oral |
| | |presentations about information and ideas in texts |
| | |(ELA-4-H4) |
| | |Language: Speaking and Listening pp. 882-895 |
| |35a. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including identifying the strengths and talents of |
| | |other participants (ELA-4-H6) |
| | |Language: Speaking and Listening pp. 882-895 |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 11: The Theme (GLEs: 09e, 11a, 12a, 22b, 28c, 33) |GLE |GLE/RESOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, learning logs notebooks, short story with emphasis on theme |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
|Literature: Theme pp. 246-247, “Disguises” pp.248-259; Comparing Universal Themes pp. 260-280 | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
|After reading a short story independently, students will brainstorm possible themes and share their | |types, including short stories and novels (ELA-6-H3)|
|responses in a small-group or whole-class discussion. Independently or in small groups, students | |Literature: Theme pp. 246-247 |
|will identify a major theme and provide four or six text-supported reasons for suggesting their | |Comparing Universal Themes pp. 260-280 |
|theme. They will next present their findings to the whole class and explain their reasons for each | | |
|choice. Finally, each student will compose both a statement of what he/she considers to be the main | | |
|theme of the story and an explanation of how a film or television show addresses the same theme. | | |
| | | |
|*Stories with an emphasis on theme: | | |
|Dell, Floyd, “The Blanket” | | |
|The Blanket | | |
|Hurst, James, “The Scarlet Ibis” | | |
|Holt Literature-“The Scarlet Ibis” pp. 415-426 | | |
|Tan, Amy, “Two Kinds” | | |
|Amy Tan: Two Kinds | | |
| | | |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including summarizing and paraphrasing |
| | |information and story elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| |12a. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |using supporting evidence to verify solutions |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |22b. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as run-on sentences (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: run-on sentences pp. 485-486 |
| |28c. |Select language appropriate to specific purposes and|
| | |audiences when speaking, including participating in |
| | |class discussions (ELA-4-H1) |
| | |Language: Speaking and Listening pp. 882-895 |
| |33. |Deliver clear, coherent, and concise oral |
| | |presentations about information and ideas in texts |
| | |(ELA-4-H4) |
| | |Language: Speaking and Listening pp. 882-895 |

|LCC UNIT 1 Activity 12: Writing a Short Story |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, learning logs notebooks, paper, Short Story Rubric BLM |17b. |Develop complex compositions on student- or |
| Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | |teacher-selected topics that are suited to an |
|Holt Literature: Writing a Short Story pp.154-162 | |identified audience and purpose and that include |
|The Story Planner | |vocabulary selected to clarify meaning, create |
| | |images, and set a tone (ELA-2-H2) |
|At the end of the short story unit, if time remains, the students will engage in four types of | |Six Traits |
|writing designed to aid in creating a short story. First, the student will employ stream of | | |
|consciousness writing by simply writing about anything that pops into their heads for a ten-minute | | |
|period. The teacher should caution them not to stop, reread, or rewrite. Next, through conversation | | |
|writing, they will make up a conversation between two or more people. This writing should consist of| | |
|direct dialogue only. Again, they should not stop to correct or rewrite. Then, using memory | | |
|writing, students will recall a particularly vivid memory of the past. The teacher should encourage | | |
|them to describe this memory fully, and ask them to figure out (and write down) the reason for their| | |
|“choosing” to remember this particular occurrence. At this point students may be encouraged to | | |
|correct or rewrite should they feel this is necessary. | | |
|Finally, students will read through their preliminary writings (A, B, C) to find something they want| | |
|to write about in short story form (incorporating life experiences in their writings). The teacher | | |
|should remind them of the elements of a short story and suggest that they think of endings to their | | |
|stories first. (They will then know where they are headed and can write toward the ending.) The | | |
|students will revise and edit their stories using all parts of speech appropriately, using correct | | |
|spelling conventions, and using quotations properly to punctuate dialogue. They will then share | | |
|finished stories with the class. Students should be encouraged to identify the elements of the short| | |
|story addressed in this unit in one another’s writing. Short stories could be compiled in a literary| | |
|magazine. | | |
| |18f. |Develop complex compositions using writing |
| | |processes, including proofreading/editing to improve|
| | |conventions of language (ELA-2-H3) |
| | |Six Traits |
| |23g. |Apply standard rules of usage, including using all |
| | |parts of speech appropriately (ELA-3-H2) |
| | |Language: Usage pp. 49-51, 52-55, 56-59, 60-66, |
| | |67-73, 74-76, 77-78, 79-80 |
| |25. |Use correct spelling conventions when writing and |
| | |editing (ELA-3-H3) |
| | |

|TIME FRAME: Approximately 3 weeks |
|LCC UNIT 2: NONFICTION - This unit focuses on reading and responding to nonfiction literature and applying a variety of reading and comprehension strategies. In |
|addition, the writing activities require analysis and application of different aspects of nonfiction literature and an examination of its relationship to real-life|
|experiences. Students recognize nonfiction is a genre of literature that deals with real people, events, and experiences and is based on fact instead of on |
|imaginary events. Students interpreting and analyzing nonfiction literature will acquire useful information that may cause students to be more effective in their |
|decision-making and in developing well-supported responses to text. Students will determine the main idea of the work and the effectiveness of the support provided|
|by the author, conduct an analysis of nonfiction literature to reveal the author’s purpose, attitude, and view of life, explain the impact of an author’s point of |
|view on the tone and meaning of nonfiction text, locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a variety of non-fiction texts, and determine how the experiences|
|described in the essay (or other nonfiction literature) relate to a real-life experience or other texts. |
| |
|Expository Text Structures: (description; sequence; cause-effect; comparison-contrast; problem-solution; question & answer) |
|Elements of Nonfiction: topic/main idea/supporting detail, fact/opinion, author’s purpose/viewpoint, problem/solution, chronological order, cause/effect, primary &|
|secondary sources |
|Elements of Primary/Secondary Sources: authentic voice; raw material used to interpret the past, and when used along with interpretations by historians, provide |
|resources necessary for historical research |
| |

|Reading Informational & Literary Nonfiction: Bio/Auto, Speeches/Interviews, |Reading Informational Text: Holt Literature pp. 38-43; pp. 55-59; pp. 88-93; pp. |
|Essays, Workplace Writing, Letters, Journals, Diaries, Textbooks, |281-293; pp. 370-375; pp. 446-454 |
|Ency/Magazine/News Articles |Holt Literature pp. 118-125; pp. 674-685; pp. 728-731 |
|Holt Literature pp. 1057-1058 |Reading Consumer and Workplace Documents: Holt Literature pp. 1058-1093 |

|Holt Elements of Literature correlation to the LA Comprehensive Curriculum |
|Elements of |Selection Title |Skill/Literary Focus |SE pages |GLEs |
|Literature, Third | | | | |
|Course © 2007 | | | | |
|Collection 1 |Can Animals Think (Article) |Developing Research Questions |38-43 |1c, 12b, 14b, 28c, 39a |
| |Far-Out Housekeeping on the ISS (Web Page) |Researching Questions |55-59 |12c, 36a, 36b, 37a, 37b, 39a, 39b, |
| | | | |39d, 43 |
| |Skills Review (Newspaper Article) |Developing Research Questions |88-91 |39a, 39d |
|Collection 2 |Teaching Chess and Life (Essay) |Using Primary and Secondary |118-125 |1d, 9a, 14b, 14d, 28b, 29b, 32b, |
| |Community Service & You (Magazine Article) |Sources | |32d, 38, 39b, 40a, 40b |
| |Feeding Frenzy (Magazine Article) | | | |
|Collection 3 |Poe’s Final Days (Biography) |Synthesizing Sources: Main Ideas |221-230 |1b, 4a, 5, 9a, 11b, 14b, 14c, 37a, |
| |Poe’s Death is Rewritten . . . (Newspaper Article) |and Supporting Evidence | |37b, 37c, 38, 39d |
| |If Only Poe Had Succeeded . . . (Letter to the Editor) | | | |
| |Rabies Death Theory (Letter to the Editor) | | | |
|Collection 4 |A Country Divided (History Book) |Synthesizing Sources: Drawing |281-293 |4a, 5, 7, 9a, 11a, 11b, 11e, 12b, |
| |Lives in the Crossfire (Nonfiction) |Conclusions | |14c, 14d, 37a, 37b, 37c, 39d |
| |Internment (Essay) | | | |
| |Peace Isn’t Impossible (Essay) | | | |
|Collection 5 |A Defense of the Jury System (Essay) |Evaluating an Argument |370-375 |1a, 11f, 12a, 14c, 21b |
|Collection 6 |The Grandfather (Essay) |Main Idea/Symbols |430-435 |1c, 3c, 9a, 20c |
| |Weapons of the Spirit (Interview) |Synthesizing Sources: Works by |446-454 |4g, 5, 11b, 12b, 14c |
| |Letter to President Roosevelt (Letter) |One Author | | |
| |On the Abolition of the Threat of War (Magazine) | | | |
| |The Arms Race (Television Interview) | | | |
|Collection 8 |Rising Tides (Op-Ed Article) |Evaluating Arguments |598-606 |11b, 11f, 12a, 14c |
| |An Artic Floe of Climate Questions (Op-Ed Article) | | | |
| |How to Eat a Guava (Autobiography) |Diction, Imagery and Tone |623-628 |5, 8a, 9f |
|Collection 9 |A Warm, Clear Day in Dallas (Biography) |Using Primary and Secondary |674-685 |9f, 12b, 14b, 14c, 14e, 28c, 38, |
| |Address to Congress, November 27, 1963 (Speech) |Sources | |39b, 40a, 40b |
| |Students React to President Kennedy’s Death (Essays) | | | |
| |Skills Review (Encyclopedia Article and Recollection) |Analyze Primary and Secondary |728-731 |38, 39b, 39d |
| | |Sources | | |
|Collection 10 |Where I Find My Heroes (Essay) |Evaluating an Argument |818-825 |1a, 14c |
| |Heroes with Solid Feet (Op-Ed Article) | | | |
| |Skill Review (Magazine Article) |Evaluating an Argument |844-847 |14e |
|Collection 11 |Dear Juliet (News Feature) |Synthesizing Sources: Making |1032-1038 |1c, 11b, 28c, 37a, 37b, 37c |
| |Romeo and Juliet in Bosnia (Op-Ed Article) |Connections | | |
|Collection 12 |Reading Consumer Documents |Elements of Consumer Documents |1062-1065 |4f, 11b, 43 |
| | | | | |
| |Following Technical Directions |Reading Technical Directions |1066-1068 |12c, 30, 36b |
| |Citing Internet Sources |Document Internet Sources |1069-1072 |4f, 42b |
| |Functional Workplace Documents |Analyzing Workplace Documents |1073-1078 |11d, 12c, 43 |
| |Functional Documents |Evaluating Logic |1079-1083 |11d, 12c, 43 |
|Holt Reader |The Great American Art Heist (Article) |KWL Chart/ Generating Research |344-352 | |
| | |Questions | | |
| |A Hill Reveals Its Secrets/D.H. Lawrence at |Synthesizing Sources |353-362 | |
| |Tarquina/Protecting the Past (Magazine Articles) | | | |
| |You Too Could Find a Dinosaur/ The Dinosaurs Weren’t |Main Idea/ Scientific Writing |363-373 | |
| |Alone (Science Articles) | | | |
| |What Caffeine Does to You (Persuasive Article) |Main Idea/Argument |374-380 | |
| |The Heimlich Maneuver (Workplace Document) |Text Structure |382-384 | |
| |Tools of the Trade (Technical Document) |Text Structure |385-389 | |
| |Earthquake: Duck, Cover & Hold (Functional Document) |Text Structure |390-395 | |
| |Works Cited List |Documentation |396-399 | |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 1: Independent Reading –Ongoing |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen/paper, reading log, high interest, multi-level young adult novels |01a. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
| | |variety of strategies, including use of context |
|The teacher should facilitate independent reading of student-selected novels by providing time for | |clues (ELA-1-H1) |
|Sustained Silent Reading (SSR) daily. (A portion of this time may be dedicated to reading aloud | |Language: pp. 545, 614, 650, 774, 875 |
|from engaging texts. This practice may be especially important if students are reluctant readers or| |Literature: pp. 166, 196 |
|are not accustomed to reading independently for sustained periods of time.) The teacher should | | |
|monitor this reading, making sure to incorporate both oral and written response to the text. | | |
|Responses may be initiated through a variety of strategies, including response logs, dialogue | | |
|letters or journals/learning logs, informal discussions at the end of SSR, and book talks. Whatever| | |
|the strategy or combination of strategies, students must go beyond summarizing in their responses if| | |
|they are to meet the GLEs listed above. These GLEs may be genre specific, but they are not meant to| | |
|restrict student choice or to require the teacher to design special focus lessons to accommodate | | |
|that student choice. The teacher may facilitate reflection at the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy| | |
|through written response to individual students, teacher-student conferences, and/or whole-class | | |
|questioning techniques. Lists of the works students have read should be maintained and monitored | | |
|via a reading log. | | |
| |02a. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
| | |author’s use of direct and indirect characterization|
| | |(ELA-1-H2) |
| |02b. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
| | |author’s pacing of action and use of plot |
| | |development, subplots, parallel episodes, and climax|
| | |to impact the reader (ELA-1-H2) |
| |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including short stories and novels (ELA-6-H3)|
| |10c. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, a short story or novel |
| | |provides a vicarious life experience (ELA-6-H4) |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including summarizing and paraphrasing |
| | |information and story elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making inferences and drawing |
| | |conclusions (ELA-7-H1) |
| |13. |Identify and explain the impact of an author’s life |
| | |on themes and issues of a single text or multiple |
| | |texts by the same author (ELA-7-H3) |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 2: Vocabulary Study - Ongoing |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: dictionaries, index cards, posters |01a. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
|http://www.myvocabulary.com/ | |variety of strategies, including use of context |
| | |clues (ELA-1-H1) |
|Following a teacher-facilitated introduction to the dictionary, students will keep a vocabulary list| | |
|of new words (both student- and teacher-selected) encountered in reading short stories. For each | | |
|word, students will record the sentence in which the word was found and suggest a synonym. | | |
| | | |
|Periodically, they will verify that they have suggested an appropriate synonym by locating a | | |
|definition and using the word correctly in a self-generated sentence, paying special attention to | | |
|the use of detailed context that provides the necessary who, what, when, where, and why most | | |
|effective for the study of words. | | |
| | | |
|Students will, at the conclusion of the unit, select five words, research etymology, and illustrate | | |
|them on a poster or in another visual presentation. Finally, students will write a reflective | | |
|paragraph on a nonfiction selection incorporating at least one of the words studied and applying | | |
|standard rules of sentence formation, including avoiding run-ons and fragments and using all parts | | |
|of speech appropriately. | | |
| |01d. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
| | |variety of strategies, including tracing etymology |
| | |(ELA-1-H1) |
| |22a. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as fragments (ELA-3-H2) |
| |22b. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as run-on sentences (ELA-3-H2) |
| |23g. |Apply standard rules of usage, including using all |
| | |parts of speech appropriately (ELA-3-H2) |
| |26. |Use a variety of resources, such as dictionaries, |
| | |thesauruses, glossaries, technology, and textual |
| | |features (e.g., definitional footnotes, sidebars) to|
| | |verify word spellings (ELA-3-H3) |
| |Sample Vocabulary Chart |
| |Sentence in which word occurs (underline word) |
| |Text Title |
| |Synonym |
| | |
| |1 |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| |2 |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 3: Writing Prompts to Make Real-Life Connections and to Assess Understanding - |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
|Ongoing |# | |
|Materials List: pen, learning logs/notebooks, index cards |05. |Explain ways in which ideas and information in a |
| | |variety of texts (e.g., scientific reports, technical|
|Since writing is a process done in recursive stages, it is important that students receive | |guidelines, business memos, literary texts) connect |
|instruction in the writing craft through mini-lessons on target skills in descriptive and expository| |to real-life situations and other texts (ELA-1-H4) |
|writing. For this nonfiction unit, target skills should include writing compositions focusing on a | | |
|central idea with important ideas or events stated in a selected order, selecting an organizational | | |
|pattern (comparison/contrast, order of importance, chronological order) appropriate to the topic, | | |
|using elaboration techniques (anecdotes, relevant facts, examples, and/or specific details), and | | |
|using transitions to unify ideas and points. Students should keep a writer’s notebook or learning | | |
|log. In teaching students writing craft, the teacher should first show them how accomplished writers| | |
|use a particular skill, and then encourage students to emulate those writers. | | |
| | | |
|Teacher will begin preparing the students to become good writers. Each writing workshop should | | |
|begin with a mini lesson. Establish the writing process as the basis for instruction. It’s always | | |
|writing process first, then the traits. Traits and the writing process fit together naturally. The | | |
|pre-writing phase of the traits is the perfect place to hammer home the importance of Ideas. The | | |
|teacher should help students generate ideas with any number of brainstorming techniques. When the | | |
|right topic and information has been generated, the student will do better. Drafting helps the | | |
|writer apply organization, word choice and sentence fluency to the first rush of ideas and voice. | | |
|Responding is enhanced by a traits based vocabulary that sharpens and enhances revision. When | | |
|students understand the language and criteria of traits, they have a variety of ways into the | | |
|revision process. Simply checking conventions and making a neat copy gives way to revision based on | | |
|all the traits. | | |
|Multiple response sessions may be needed, since the teacher will want to limit the response to one | | |
|trait at a time. Too much feedback will only confuse a writer. It's always better to keep the | | |
|feedback short and focused on one strength and one area for improvement. | | |
|Editing for conventions helps prepare the piece for formal assessment and publication, which ends | | |
|the writing cycle. | | |
|Teacher should teach or review the traits for effective writing. Students will learn the traits of | | |
|writing through the Writing Craft Mini-Lessons. Compare strong & weak writing examples for each | | |
|trait. Provide ample practice rewriting weak samples into strong samples. Have students score sample| | |
|papers. The 6+1 Trait® Writing analytical model for assessing and teaching writing is made up of | | |
|6+1 key qualities that define strong writing. These are: | | |
|Ideas, the main message; | | |
|Organization, the internal structure of the piece; | | |
|Voice, the personal tone and flavor of the author's message; | | |
|Word Choice, the vocabulary a writer chooses to convey meaning; | | |
|Sentence Fluency, the rhythm and flow of the language; | | |
|Conventions, the mechanical correctness; | | |
|Presentation, how the writing actually looks on the page. | | |
|Examples of typical mini lessons could include: word choice, usage, or conventions; techniques for | | |
|organizing; kinds of writings for students to try; writing as a process; pieces of writing that | | |
|demonstrate different techniques. Teacher should teach or review the traits for effective writing. | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|The teacher will create SPAWN prompts as students prepare to learn new information or reflect on | | |
|what has been learned. SPAWN (view literacy strategy descriptions) is an acronym that stands for | | |
|five categories of writing options (Special Powers, Problem Solving, Alternatives Viewpoints, What | | |
|If?, and Next). Using these categories, the teacher can create numerous thought-provoking and | | |
|meaningful prompts. This kind of writing usually calls for students to anticipate what will be | | |
|learned that day. | | |
|Additionally, the teacher may have students write learning log/journal entries to prompts (or ask | | |
|questions) related to this topic: Connect an aspect of the story to prior knowledge or real-life | | |
|experiences or related text (e.g., as an initiation/motivational activity, a check-for-understanding| | |
|activity during reading and discussion, or a summative activity/assessment). | | |
| | | |
|Along with using learning logs, students may respond to prompts on entrance cards, “Stop and | | |
|Writes,” and exit cards (writing-for-understanding strategies). They will then either submit the | | |
|response to the teacher for assessment or discuss the response with the whole class as initiation, | | |
|comprehension, or closure activities. | | |
|Prompts should address comprehension and reasoning skills, higher-order thinking, and connections | | |
|between text and real-life experiences. Prompts can be used to begin discussions or for assessments.| | |
|During discussion, students use active listening strategies. Students should be encouraged to | | |
|identify strong insight provided by peers. | | |
| | | |
| |10c. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, a short story or novel |
| | |provides a vicarious life experience (ELA-6-H4) |
| |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
| | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |21d. |Write for various purposes, including text-supported |
| | |interpretations that connect life experiences to |
| | |works of literature (ELA-2-H6) |
| |32a. |Use active listening strategies, including monitoring|
| | |messages for clarity (ELA-4-H4) |
| |32b. |Use active listening strategies, including selecting |
| | |and organizing essential information (ELA-4-H4) |
| |35a. |Participate in group and panel discussions, including|
| | |identifying the strengths and talents of other |
| | |participants (ELA-4-H6) |
| | |
| |Six Traits PowerPoint |
| |http://classroom.jc-schools.net/daleyl/6_Traits1.ppt |
| |Six Traits websites |
| |http://educationnorthwest.org/traits |
| |http://www.writingfix.com/ |
| |http://www.edina.k12.mn.us/concord/teacherlinks/sixtraits/sixt|
| |raits.html |
| |http://6traits.cyberspaces.net/ |
| |Write Source: Student Models: |
| |http://thewritesource.com/models.htm |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| |Sample SPAWN prompts |
| | |
| |P - Problem Solving |
| |We learned yesterday about author’s point of view. After |
| |reading the title and first paragraph, discuss the author’s |
| |viewpoint and provide text-supported evidence. |
| |N – Next |
| |We have been discussing the characteristics of non-fiction |
| |writing. What can you expect to encounter in this next piece |
| |of non-fiction writing? |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| |On other days, conclude the lesson with a SPAWN prompt that |
| |asks students to reflect on or think more critically about |
| |what they have just learned: |
| |S - Special Powers |
| |You have the power to abolish one law, rule, or societal norm.|
| |Describe what it is you would change, why you would change it,|
| |and the consequences of the change. (See Activity 11) |
| |W - What If? |
| |What might have happened if there were no consumer articles or|
| |advocates? |
| |A - Alternative Viewpoints Imagine you’re a famous producer of|
| |commercials for new products. Select a product and discuss |
| |what you would do to convince that consumer to buy your |
| |product. |
| | |
| | |
|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 4: Grammar/Usage Mini-Lessons - Ongoing |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: writing samples, textbook, learning log/notebook |22a. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
|Holt Language http://eolit.hrw.com/hlla/newmainlinks/lang.jsp | |common errors, such as fragments (ELA-3-H2) |
| | | |
|High-frequency words: http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hswriting/ | | |
|The teacher will facilitate a classroom discussion at the beginning of class period or activity on | | |
|sentence formation problems (i.e. fragments, run-ons, or syntax problems,) or standard rules of | | |
|usage or mechanics (i.e. capitalization for names of political and ethnic groups, religions, and | | |
|continents; use of colons preceding a list and after a salutation in a business letter; correct | | |
|spelling conventions). Discussion will be based on the common errors in student writing samples. | | |
|The mini-lesson activities (which will be ongoing and skill-specific) will incorporate any text | | |
|which features rhetorically significant use of the grammar/usage being taught and student-generated | | |
|writings. Ideally, the mini-lessons will become differentiated for students’ specific needs and | | |
|will be integrated within student writing assignments and not taught in isolation. | | |
|Sample mini-lessons can be accessed at: | | |
|http://cahsee.ucdavis.edu/pdfs/minilessons_resources_for_writing.pdf | | |
| | | |
|Sample Mini-lesson | | |
|The teacher will write on the board: | | |
|the definition for sentence fragment (a group of words that is punctuated as if it were a complete | | |
|sentence but that does not contain both a subject and a verb or that does not express a complete | | |
|thought) | | |
|four sentences | | |
|Has one of the most interesting autobiographies! | | |
|Ernest Gaines a Louisiana writer. | | |
|Landing at the airport. | | |
|With great courage on the football field. | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|As a class, identify the subject and verb in each sentence (You won’t find them in 3 or 4!) | | |
|Then as a class or individually, complete/correct the sentences. If time allows, identify the other | | |
|parts of the sentence. | | |
| |22b. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as run-on sentences (ELA-3-H2) |
| |22c. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as syntax problems (ELA-3-H2) |
| |24a. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |commas to set off appositives or parenthetical |
| | |phrases (ELA-3-H2) |
| |24b. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |quotation marks to set off titles |
| | |of short works (ELA-3-H2) |
| |24d. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |standard capitalization for names of political and |
| | |ethnic groups, religions, and continents (ELA-3-H2) |
| |25. |Use correct spelling conventions when writing and |
| | |editing (ELA-3-H3) |
| | | |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 5: Quotable Quotes |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, learning logs notebooks, short biography, computers with Biography website book |04a. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
|marked | |written responses about ideas and information in |
|Holt Author Biographies: http://eolit.hrw.com/hlla/newmainlinks/lit.jsp | |texts, including nonfiction works (ELA-1-H3) |
| | | |
|Students will read a biographical account of a contemporary personality; teacher may download short | | |
|biographies, videos or interviews from the Biography website www.biography.com | | |
|or allow students to access the website in a computer lab. Next, students will research and select | | |
|(or teacher will provide) a statement by the individual that provides insight into the person’s | | |
|beliefs about life. Students will paraphrase the statement, analyze it in terms of word choices, make| | |
|inferences about its meaning, and link it to real-life situations. Students will use their analyses | | |
|to develop an expository paragraph that explains how the direct quotation (which should be correctly | | |
|punctuated with quotation marks) relates to the individual’s life and achievements. The paragraph | | |
|should be organized with a topic sentence and an appropriate closing sentence. | | |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information - |
| | |summarizing and paraphrasing information and story |
| | |elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
| | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |15a. |Develop organized, coherent paragraphs that include |
| | |topic sentences (ELA-2-H1) |
| |15d. |Develop organized, coherent paragraphs that include |
| | |appropriate closing sentences (ELA-2-H1) |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 6: Information, Please! |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, paper, learning logs notebooks, sample articles/documents, Process and Product |04g. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
|Checklists BLM | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including public documents (ELA-1-H3) |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | | |
|Writing Models: http://go.hrw.com/eolang/modbank/ | | |
| | | |
|The teacher will print, distribute and explain the Process and Product Checklists blackline master in| | |
|order to set expectations for, and guide students through, this activity. | | |
| | | |
|The teacher will also create an SQPL (view literacy strategy descriptions) lesson by generating a | | |
|statement related to each article that would cause students to wonder, challenge, or question. For | | |
|example, the teacher might use the article entitled “Legalize drugs — all of them” by Norm Stamper, | | |
|and simply state, “All drugs should be legal.” Students then work in pairs or collaborative groups | | |
|to generate 2-3 questions they would like answered; teacher may circulate and add questions if | | |
|students have failed to ask about important information they need to learn. Students should be | | |
|encouraged to discuss the answers to their questions during shared reading. | | |
|After students (in pairs or small groups) have completed reading the informational periodical article| | |
|or a public document, they will work to prepare a single report that includes: | | |
|a statement of the main idea presented by the author | | |
|a list of the key points of the article | | |
|a summary of the author’s viewpoint | | |
|an explanation of a connection between information in the article to personal experience and/or other| | |
|text | | |
|a conclusion about the purpose and effectiveness of the article | | |
|a correct citation for the article | | |
|correct use of the colon when listing | | |
|standard use of capitalization for political/ethnic groups, religions, continents, etc. | | |
|Groups will present their work to the whole class. Although the group prepares and delivers a single | | |
|report, each student will individually assess his/her contributions to the process and the group’s | | |
|product (See Process and Product Checklists BLM) for final assessment of the activity. | | |
| |05. |Explain ways in which ideas and information in a |
| | |variety of texts (e.g., scientific reports, |
| | |technical guidelines, business memos, literary |
| | |texts) connect to real-life situations and other |
| | |texts (ELA-1-H4) |
| |10a. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, an essay expresses a point|
| | |of view (ELA-6-H4) |
| |24c. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |colons preceding a list and after a salutation in a |
| | |business letter (ELA-3-H2) |
| |24d. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |standard capitalization for names of political and |
| | |ethnic groups, religions, and continents (ELA-3-H2) |
| |42b. |Give credit for borrowed information in |
| | |grade-appropriate research reports following |
| | |acceptable use policy, including preparing |
| | |bibliographies and/or works cited list (ELA-5-H5) |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| | |
| |*Sample articles and documents |
| | |
| |Stamper, Norm, “Legalize drugs — all of them” (The Seattle |
| |Times) |
| |Hatch, Cameron, “Why do NBA Fights Get More Press than Other |
| |Sports?” (The Hatch Report) |
| |The Gettysburg Address by President Abraham Lincoln |
| |9/11 speech by President George W Bush |
| | |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 7: Becoming an Educated Consumer |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, paper, learning logs notebooks, notes on connotative vs. denotative meanings, |01c. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
|sample TV or print advertisements for comparison, sample informational consumer articles (printed or | |variety of strategies, use of denotative and |
|online), Consumer Article GISTing Example BLM | |connotative meanings (ELA-1-H1) |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | | |
| | | |
|The teacher will facilitate an introduction on the importance of reading and understanding consumer | | |
|materials, focusing on how to determine the connotative as well as denotative meanings of words. | | |
|Students will write a comparison/contrast paragraph, using two television or print advertisements in | | |
|which they discuss each advertisement’s inference and validity. Students should be encouraged to | | |
|question the advertisement’s authority, accuracy and objectivity and to consider the publication | | |
|date, if provided. | | |
| | | |
|*A more detailed form of this activity may be accessed at the ReadWriteThink website under the | | |
|heading Critical Media Literacy: Commercial Advertising. | | |
| | | |
|Next, students will individually select an informational consumer article* to read and then develop a| | |
|two- to three-paragraph summary. Depending on the levels of abilities of students, the teacher may | | |
|want to consider introducing the GISTing literacy strategy (view literacy strategy descriptions) in | | |
|order to remind students of the fundamental characteristics of summaries: | | |
|shorter than the original text | | |
|a paraphrase of the author’s words and descriptions | | |
|focused on the main points or events | | |
| | | |
|* See Blackline Master (BLM): Consumer Article GISTing Example | | |
| | | |
|In this writing task, students should focus on correct and appropriate use of transitional words and | | |
|phrases. | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|After examining the sequence of information through summary, the students will critique/examine the | | |
|logic or development of ideas in texts by creating a thinking map (a bubble visual, for example). | | |
|The main idea of the article should be written in the center, and the outer circles should be used to| | |
|cite specific evidence to support the assertion(s). | | |
|Consumer articles may be obtained from the Better Business Bureau website. | | |
| | | |
| |04f. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas in |
| | |consumer/instructional materials (ELA-1-H3) |
| |11b. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including comparing and contrasting |
| | |information in texts, including televised news, news|
| | |magazines, documentaries, and online information |
| | |(ELA-7-H1) |
| |11d. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including examining the sequence of |
| | |information and procedures in order to critique the |
| | |logic or development of ideas in texts (ELA-7-H1) |
| |12a. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |using supporting evidence to verify solutions |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |14b. |Analyze information within and across |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using various reasoning |
| | |skills, including raising questions (ELA-7-H4) |
| | | |
| |15c. |Develop organized, coherent paragraphs that include |
| | |transitional words and phrases (ELA-2-H1)Language |
| | |pp. 521-525 |
| |16d. |Develop multiparagraph compositions organized with |
| | |transitional words and phrases that unify throughout|
| | |(ELA-2-H1) |
| |37c. |Locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a |
| | |variety of grade-appropriate resources, including |
| | |other media sources (e.g., community and government |
| | |data, television and radio resources, and other |
| | |audio and visual materials) (ELA-5-H2) |
| |38. |Analyze the usefulness and accuracy of sources by |
| | |determining their validity (e.g., authority, |
| | |accuracy, objectivity, publication date, and |
| | |coverage) (ELA-5-H2) |
| | |
| | |
| |Bubble visual |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 8: Tracking the Trends of Today—Information Gathering |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, paper, learning logs notebooks, note cards, sample topics, sample author |36a. |Identify and use organizational features to locate |
|questions, computers, periodicals | |relevant information for research projects using a |
| | |variety of resources, including print resources |
|Students will select a topic of personal and current interest, formulate a clear research question, | |(e.g., prefaces, appendices, annotations, citations,|
|and research it in: | |bibliographic references) (ELA-5-H1) |
|print sources (e.g., periodicals, encyclopedias, almanacs, etc.) | | |
|electronic sources (e.g., a database such as www.Galenet.galegroup.com/, which is available to all | | |
|Louisiana school districts, community and government data, public media sources, and other audio and| | |
|visual materials) | | |
|complex graphic organizers (e.g., detailed maps, diagrams, sidebars, etc.) | | |
| | | |
|Teacher Note: The topic should not be restricted, except for research on individuals, such as | | |
|historical figures, celebrities, athletes, etc., and any sensitive topics excluded by the school | | |
|system. | | |
|After locating relevant information in three to five sources and analyzing the usefulness and | | |
|accuracy of each source, the teacher will help students to go beyond the words on the page and | | |
|construct meaning of text by using the Questioning the Author (QtA) literacy strategy (view literacy| | |
|strategy descriptions). The teacher will help students to generate a list of questions students | | |
|should ask of the authors (i.e., What are you [the author] trying to say? Why do you feel that way? | | |
|What would make you change your mind? Who disagrees with you? Why would people disagree with you? | | |
|Etc.) | | |
| | | |
|Then students will gather information from a minimum of one print source and one online source and | | |
|take notes on note cards in preparation for a research-based report. | | |
| | | |
| |37a. |Locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a |
| | |variety of grade-appropriate resources, including |
| | |multiple printed texts (e.g., encyclopedias, |
| | |atlases, library catalogs, specialized dictionaries,|
| | |almanacs, technical encyclopedias, and periodicals) |
| | |(ELA-5-H2) |
| |37b. |Locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a |
| | |variety of grade-appropriate resources, including |
| | |electronic sources (e.g., Web sites, databases) |
| | |(ELA-5-H2) |
| |39a. |Access information and conduct research using |
| | |various grade-appropriate, data-gathering |
| | |strategies/tools, including formulating clear |
| | |research questions (ELA-5-H3) |
| |39b. |Access information and conduct research using |
| | |various grade-appropriate, data-gathering |
| | |strategies/tools, including gathering evidence from |
| | |primary and secondary sources (ELA-5-H3) |
| |39d. |Access information and conduct research using |
| | |various grade-appropriate, data-gathering |
| | |strategies/tools, including compiling and organizing|
| | |information to support the central ideas, concepts, |
| | |and themes of formal papers or presentations |
| | |(ELA-5-H3) |
| |43. |Analyze information found in a variety of complex |
| | |graphic organizers, including detailed maps, |
| | |comparative charts, extended tables, graphs, |
| | |diagrams, cutaways, overlays, and sidebars to |
| | |determine usefulness for research (ELA-5-H6) |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 9: Writing a Research-Based Report |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials: pen, paper, research from Activity 8, computers, Research-Based Report Rubric BLM |16a. |Develop multiparagraph compositions organized with a|
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | |clearly stated central idea or thesis statement |
| | |(ELA-2-H1) |
|After completing the information-gathering stage of the research process, students will develop a | | |
|research report that includes the following: | | |
|clearly stated central idea | | |
|introduction, body, and appropriate conclusion | | |
|incorporating facts, details, and/or examples | | |
|logical sequence with the aid of appropriate transitional words. | | |
|parenthetical citations to integrate quotes | | |
|publishing using technology | | |
|original graphics, when appropriate | | |
| | | |
|The teacher should first discuss the rubric with the students in order to clarify expectations and | | |
|then guide the students through the steps in the writing process. During the peer- and | | |
|teacher-review stage, students should focus on the development of an organized composition that has | | |
|a clear central idea, structure, and sequence. Additionally, transitional words and/or phrases | | |
|should be used for unity throughout. Both teacher and student will evaluate the report using the | | |
|rubric provided. | | |
| |16b. |Develop multiparagraph compositions organized with a|
| | |clear, overall structure that includes an |
| | |introduction, a body, and an appropriate conclusion |
| | |(ELA-2-H1) |
| |16c. |Develop multiparagraph compositions organized in a |
| | |logical sequence (e.g., spatial order, order of |
| | |importance, ascending/descending order, |
| | |chronological order, parallel construction) |
| | |(ELA-2-H1) |
| |16d. |Develop multiparagraph compositions organized with |
| | |transitional words and phrases that unify throughout|
| | |(ELA-2-H1) |
| |18g. |Develop complex compositions using writing processes|
| | |- publishing using technology ( |
| |40a. |Write a variety of research reports - research |
| | |supporting the main ideas |
| |40b. |Write a variety of research reports, which include |
| | |facts, details, examples, and explanations from |
| | |sources (ELA-5-H3) |
| |40c. |Write a variety of research reports - include |
| | |graphics when appropriate (ELA-5-H3) |
| |40d. |Write a variety of research reports, with complete |
| | |documentation (e.g., endnotes, parenthetical |
| | |citations, works cited lists, or bibliographies) |
| | |(ELA-5-H3) |
| |42a. |Give credit for borrowed information in research |
| | |reports following acceptable use policy - using |
| | |parenthetical documentation to integrate quotes and |
| | |citations (ELA-5-H5) |

|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 10: Essay Analysis: What’s the Point? (GLEs: 04a, 09a, 10a, 11d, 11e, 12a, |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
|35b) |# | |
|Materials: posters, markers, sample persuasive essays, DR-TA description |04a. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
|The teacher will facilitate a review of the characteristics of an essay as a literary type. | |texts, including nonfiction works (ELA-1-H3) |
|In a whole-group setting, students will read a persuasive essay on a current topic by a contemporary| | |
|writer, politician, or journalist and engage in a DR-TA, directed reading-thinking activity (view | | |
|literacy strategy descriptions). In this activity, the teacher elicits student input regarding prior| | |
|knowledge and personal experiences, invites/records predictions, assists in checking/revising | | |
|predictions during reading, and uses predictions as a post-reading discussion tool. (Emphasize for | | |
|students that they should use this same process when they read their textbook independently.) In | | |
|addition, the teacher should ask students to analyze author’s point of view, examine the sequence of| | |
|information, draw conclusions, explain and analyze passages, and assess the effectiveness of the | | |
|writer’s persuasive techniques. | | |
|Finally, in cooperative groups, students will create posters that show their understanding of the | | |
|key ideas and persuasive techniques expressed in the essay. Groups will present their posters to the| | |
|class and explain their work. | | |
| |09a. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types - essays by early and modern writers |
| | |(ELA-6-H3) |
| |10a. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, an essay expresses a point|
| | |of view (ELA-6-H4) |
| |11d. |Demonstrate understanding of information - examining|
| | |the sequence of information and procedures in order |
| | |to critique the logic or development of ideas in |
| | |texts (ELA-7-H1) |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information - making |
| | |inferences and drawing conclusions |
| |12a. |Solve problems using reasoning skills - supporting |
| | |evidence to verify solutions |
| |35b. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including acting as facilitator, recorder, leader, |
| | |listener, or mediator (ELA-4-H6) |
|LCC UNIT 2 Activity 11: Writing Persuasively |GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
| |# | |
|Materials List: pen, paper, learning logs notebooks, sample persuasive topics (can be accessed at |14b. |Analyze information within and across |
|http://www.goodessaytopics.com/list-of-persuasive-essay-topics.html), printed graphic organizer or | |grade-appropriate texts using various reasoning |
|computers and printer if using online, interactive graphic organizer. | |skills, including raising questions (ELA-7-H4) |
| | | |
|After reading and analyzing a persuasive essay (Activity 10), students will work cooperatively as a | | |
|whole group and use a sample topic (i.e., media violence has a negative effect on society, curfews | | |
|are not necessary for people over the age of fifteen, the influence of the Internet causes more harm| | |
|than good, etc.) to identify effective techniques to use in developing a persuasive essay. Students | | |
|will then work in cooperative groups to brainstorm topics of interest related to their school, | | |
|community, and state about which they have strong convictions (i.e., uniform policies positively | | |
|impact the learning process; schools should increase funding for physical education, rather than | | |
|decreasing it; student athletes in college should be paid for playing; violent video games | | |
|contribute to teen violence; women in the military should be allowed in combat, etc.). After | | |
|compiling a class list, each student will select a topic and use writing processes to develop a | | |
|persuasive letter to the editor*. Students will focus on including stylistic features such as: | | |
|vocabulary appropriate to the audience | | |
|phrasing that reflects the personality of the writer (clear voice) | | |
|sentence structures that show variety | | |
| | | |
|*Note: Students could be encouraged to use and print an online, interactive graphic organizer such | | |
|as a persuasion map http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/persuasion_map/ ) | | |
| |17d. |Develop complex compositions on student- or |
| | |teacher-selected topics that are suited to an |
| | |identified audience and purpose and that include |
| | |clear voice (individual personality) (ELA-2-H2) |
| |18a. |Develop complex compositions using writing |
| | |processes, including selecting topic and form (e.g.,|
| | |determining a purpose and audience) (ELA-2-H3) |
| |18b. |Develop complex compositions using writing |
| | |processes, including prewriting (e.g., |
| | |brainstorming, clustering, outlining, generating |
| | |main idea/thesis statements) (ELA-2-H3) |
| |19. |Develop paragraphs and complex, multiparagraph |
| | |compositions using all modes of writing |
| | |(description, narration, exposition, and persuasion)|
| | |emphasizing exposition and persuasion (ELA-2-H4) |
| |20b. |Develop paragraphs and complex, multiparagraph |
| | |compositions that include complex stylistic |
| | |features, including vocabulary and phrasing that |
| | |reflect an individual character (voice) (ELA-2-H5) |
| |20c. |Develop paragraphs and complex, multiparagraph |
| | |compositions that include complex stylistic |
| | |features, including a variety of sentence lengths |
| | |and structures, including simple, compound, and |
| | |complex (ELA-2-H5) |
| |21b. |Write for various purposes, including letters to the|
| | |editor (ELA-2-H6) |
| |35b. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including acting as facilitator, recorder, leader, |
| | |listener, or mediator (ELA-4-H6) |

|TIME FRAME: Approximately 2 weeks |
|READING LITERARY NONFICTION - This unit focuses on reading, comprehending, interpreting, and responding to nonfiction, focusing on biography, autobiography, and |
|the personal essay. Biography and autobiography will be analyzed for defining characteristics and writing techniques. Researching biographies/autobiographies |
|provide opportunities for students’ acquisition of informational, technological, and problem-solving skills. Vocabulary development and grammar instruction occur |
|within the context of the literature and student writing. Nonfiction literature tells about real people, real events, real places, and real objects. Students will |
|recognize that nonfiction writing can be subjective or objective. Sometimes known as literary nonfiction, biographies, autobiographies, and essays read like |
|fiction, yet provide factual information. Reading literary nonfiction can also teach students about different periods in history. Reading about other lives may |
|change one’s own life, just through the connection to others’ personal experiences. |
|Elements of Literary Nonfiction: |
|topic/main idea/supporting detail, fact vs. opinion; author’s purpose/viewpoint, characters and |
|characterization, plot & plot structure, setting, chronological order, cause/effect, flashback and |
|foreshadowing |

|LCC UNIT Activity 12: Analyzing Autobiographical Passages: First-Person Point of View and Literary|GLE |GLE/RESOOURCES |
|Devices |# | |
|Materials List: pen, paper, learning logs notebooks, sample autobiographies, definition/samples of |03f. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
|sarcasm and irony, Autobiographical Group Presentations Rubric BLM | |devices, including sarcasm/irony (ELA-1-H2) |
| | | |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | | |
|Holt Literature: Bio/Auto pp. 623-628; | | |
|Analyzing Nonfiction/Biography pp. 232-239; | | |
|Evaluating Author’s Style pp. 572-573; | | |
|Evaluating Arguments Pro & Con pp. 598-606; | | |
|Analyzing and Evaluating Speeches pp. 1048-1051 | | |
| | | |
|Students will read a selected autobiography* and then write a learning log entry in which they | | |
|discuss the advantages and the disadvantages of writing in the first-person point of view. After | | |
|reading their entries aloud to the class, students will create class lists of the advantages and | | |
|disadvantages. During the sharing, students should use active-listening strategies, including | | |
|generating and asking questions concerning a speaker’s content (first-person point of view), | | |
|delivery, and attitude toward the subject. | | |
| | | |
|In cooperative groups, students will select passages (from autobiography or autobiographies | | |
|examined) that they think provide the best insight into the personality and life views of a writer, | | |
|analyze the passages in terms of what each tells them about the subject, and identify any examples | | |
|of sarcasm and/or irony that they encounter. Each group will present a dramatic, oral interpretation| | |
|of its passage with accompanying analysis or explanation to the class. | | |
| | | |
|Finally, students will write an autobiographical paragraph that includes a literary device such as | | |
|sarcasm or irony. | | |
|*Sample Short Autobiographies (hyperlinks included) | | |
|Franklin, Benjamin. http://odur.let.rug.nl/usa/B/bfranklin/frank3.htm Mahoney, Dan. A Short | | |
|Autobiography of Dan Mahoney | | |
|Michener, Anna J. Becoming Anna: The Autobiography of a Sixteen-Year-Old (excerpt) | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|How To Recognize Irony | | |
|Quite often sarcasm is mistaken for irony; however, sarcasm is a form of irony which uses sharp wit | | |
|to highlight the obviousness, stupidity, or annoyance-factor of a situation. One main difference | | |
|between irony and sarcasm is that irony is generally observed and sarcasm is generally created (i.e.| | |
|spoken, written). People don't usually go about actively pursuing the creation of irony. On the | | |
|other hand, anyone who is relatively safe from being labeled stupid, and has availed themselves of | | |
|the How To Be Sarcastic tutorial, can readily create sarcasm throughout their daily life. This | | |
|interpretation may be lacking, but it serves to start us on a straightforward path to understanding | | |
|what irony is. | | |
|Verbal Irony: Sarcasm - When the speaker says, "I appreciate your help.", when no help was provided | | |
|to the speaker, makes that comment sarcastic. Hyperbole (overstatement) - "There was never anyone as| | |
|educated.", in describing someone who is uneducated. Understatement - When the speaker says, "It was| | |
|a bit cold.", when he has lost a leg due to frost bite. | | |
|Dramatic Irony: Dramatic irony is the result of the contrast between the understanding of a | | |
|situation by the dramatic character and the audience. Basically, the audience understands the | | |
|situation as it really is, where the character in the story is oblivious to the reality of things. | | |
| | | |
| |09f. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including biographies and autobiographies |
| | |(ELA-6-H3) |
| |10a. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, an essay expresses a point|
| | |of view (ELA-6-H4) |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making inferences and drawing |
| | |conclusions (ELA-7-H1) |
| |11f. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making predictions and |
| | |generalizations (ELA-7-H1) |
| |19. |Develop paragraphs and complex, multiparagraph |
| | |compositions using all modes of writing |
| | |(description, narration, exposition, and persuasion)|
| | |emphasizing exposition and persuasion (ELA-2-H4) |
| |20a. |Develop paragraphs and complex, multiparagraph |
| | |compositions that include complex stylistic |
| | |features, including literary devices such as student|
| | |composed oxymoron, touches of sarcasm, and/or irony |
| | |(ELA-2-H5) |
| |28c. |Select language appropriate to specific purposes and|
| | |audiences when speaking, including participating in |
| | |class discussions (ELA-4-H1) |
| |29a. |Listen to oral instructions and presentations, |
| | |speeches, discussions, and carry out procedures, |
| | |including taking accurate notes (ELA-4-H2) |
| |32d. |Use active listening strategies, including |
| | |generating and asking questions concerning a |
| | |speaker’s content, delivery, and attitude toward the|
| | |subject (ELA-4-H4) |
| |33. |Deliver clear, coherent, and concise oral |
| | |presentations about information and ideas in texts |
| | |(ELA-4-H4) |
| |35b. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including acting as facilitator, recorder, leader, |
| | |listener, or mediator (ELA-4-H6) |

|TIME FRAME: Approximately 3 weeks |
|LCC UNIT 3: POETRY - Essential components of this unit include the analysis of the effects of literary elements and devices common to the genre of poetry; the |
|development of paragraphs, essays, letters, and poems that address various elements of poetry; and the linking of these elements to real-life experiences. Ongoing |
|activities such as reading independently, responding to a variety of writing prompts in a journal/learning log, defining and applying vocabulary, constructing |
|literary terms list(s), and studying grammar/usage through mini-lessons will continue. Interpretation and analysis of various types of poems are essential goals of|
|this unit. Additional critical goals include developing well-supported responses to poetry and examining the meanings and effects of literary elements and devices,|
|as well as elements of form, that are particular to the genre. The Epic unit focuses on detailed analysis of traditional and contemporary epics and the |
|relationship between the struggles of fictional characters and real-life situations. In ongoing activities, students will respond to a variety of writing prompts |
|in a journal, define and use vocabulary words within the context of the literature, and construct a list of important literary terms. Critical goals include |
|reading, comprehending, and interpreting the epic; identifying distinctive characteristics of the epic; analyzing the effects of the literary elements and devices;|
|and developing writing skills by creating well-supported responses to text. |
|Elements of Poetry: lyric & narrative forms, stanza, free verse, rhyme, rhythm, repetition & refrain, sound devices: alliteration, onomatopoeia, vivid sensory |
|imagery; tone; theme; mood/feeling; analogy; symbolism; figurative language: simile, metaphor, analogy, personification, hyperbole, idiom |
|Reading & Responding to Poetry/Epic |
|Holt Literature: Collection 7 Poetry TE pp. 472A-J; pp. 472-569 |

|Holt Elements of Literature correlation to the LA Comprehensive Curriculum |
|Elements of Literature, Third |Selection Title |Skill/Literary Focus |SE pages |GLEs |
|Course © 2007 | | | | |
|Collection 5 |The Road Not Taken |Contradictions |376-380 |3c, 5, 20b |
|Collection 7 |Starfish |Exploring Theme/Imagery |476-479 |9c |
| |A Blessing |Imagery |480-483 |3b, 17b, 20c |
| |Woman Work/Daily |Catalog Poem |484-488 |9c, 20b |
| |In Just- |Fresh Images |489-493 |3b, 17b, 20c |
| |Haiku |Elements of Haiku |494-497 |3b, 20a |
| |Once by the Pacific |Sonnet |498-499 |9c |
| |Country Scene |Lyric Poem |500-503 |5, 9c |
| |Tiburón |Similes |506-507 |17b, 20a |
| |Folding Won Tons In |Reading a Poem/Figurative Language |508-510 |17b, 20c |
| |“Hope” is the thing with feathers |Extended Metaphor |511 |3 |
| |Internment |Denotation and Connotation/ Diction |512-515 |1c, 3c, 5 |
| |Fog/Fire and Ice |Implied metaphor |516-519 |3g, 5 |
| |The Seven Ages of Man |Extended Metaphor |520-522 |3 |
| |Women |Tone |523-525 |3g, 7 |
| |Boy at the Window |Personification |526-529 |3f, 33 |
| |I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud |Rhythm and Meter |533-536 |9c |
| |The Courage That My Mother Had |Rhyme |537-538 |9c |
| |Ballad of Birmingham |Ballad |539-543 |3f, 5, 6, 7, 9c |
| |The Gift |Free Verse |544-547 |9c |
| |Legal Alien/Extranjera legal |Speaker |548-550 |9c |
| |The Base Stealer/American Hero |Sound and Sense |551-554 |9c |
| |Skill Review |Characteristics of Poetry |566-568 |3b, 3g |
|Holt Reader |The Sacred/Mooring |Figures of Speech |205-210 | |
| |The Bat/this morning/How I Learned |Sounds of Poetry |211-217 | |
| |English | | | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 1: Independent Reading (Ongoing) |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen/paper, reading log, high interest, multi-level young adult novels |01a. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
| | |variety of strategies, including use of context |
|The teacher should facilitate independent reading of student-selected novels by providing time for | |clues (ELA-1-H1) |
|Sustained Silent Reading (SSR) daily. (A portion of this time may be dedicated to reading aloud | | |
|from engaging texts. This practice may be especially important if students are reluctant readers or| | |
|are not accustomed to reading independently for sustained periods of time.) The teacher should | | |
|monitor this reading, making sure to incorporate both oral and written response to the text. | | |
|Responses may be initiated through a variety of strategies, including response logs, dialogue | | |
|letters or journals/learning logs, informal discussions at the end of SSR, and book talks. Whatever| | |
|the strategy or combination of strategies, students must go beyond summarizing in their responses if| | |
|they are to meet the GLEs listed above. These GLEs may be genre specific, but they are not meant to| | |
|restrict student choice or to require the teacher to design special focus lessons to accommodate | | |
|that student choice. | | |
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| | | |
|The teacher may facilitate reflection at the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy through written | | |
|response to individual students, teacher-student conferences, and/or whole-class questioning | | |
|techniques. Lists of the works students have read should be maintained and monitored via a reading | | |
|log. | | |
| |02a. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
| | |author’s use of direct and indirect characterization|
| | |(ELA-1-H2) |
| |02b. |Identify and explain story elements, including the |
| | |author’s pacing of action and use of plot |
| | |development, subplots, parallel episodes, and climax|
| | |to impact the reader (ELA-1-H2) |
| |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including poetry/epics (ELA-1-H3) |
| |09e. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including forms of lyric and narrative poetry|
| | |such as ballads and sonnets (ELA-6-H3) |
| |10c. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, a short story or novel |
| | |provides a vicarious life experience (ELA-6-H4) |
| | | |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information - |
| | |summarizing and paraphrasing information and story |
| | |elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| |13. |Identify and explain the impact of an author’s life |
| | |on themes and issues of a single text or multiple |
| | |texts by the same author (ELA-7-H3) |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 2: Vocabulary Study (Ongoing) |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: dictionaries, index cards, posters |01a. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
|http://www.myvocabulary.com/ | |variety of strategies, including use of context |
|http://www.freerice.com | |clues (ELA-1-H1) |
| | | |
|Following a teacher-facilitated introduction to the dictionary, students will keep a vocabulary list| | |
|of new words (both student- and teacher-selected) encountered in reading short stories. For each | | |
|word, students will record the sentence in which the word was found and suggest a synonym. | | |
|Sample Vocabulary Chart | | |
|Sentence in which word occurs (underline word) | | |
|Text Title | | |
|Synonym | | |
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|1 | | |
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|2 | | |
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|Periodically, they will verify that they have suggested an appropriate synonym by locating a | | |
|definition and using the word correctly in a self-generated sentence, paying special attention to | | |
|the use of detailed context that provides the necessary who, what, when, where, and why most | | |
|effective for the study of words. | | |
| | | |
|Students will, at the conclusion of the unit, select five words, research etymology, and illustrate | | |
|them on a poster or in another visual presentation. Finally, students will write a reflective | | |
|paragraph on a nonfiction selection incorporating at least one of the words studied and applying | | |
|standard rules of sentence formation, including avoiding run-ons and fragments and using all parts | | |
|of speech appropriately. | | |
| |01d. |Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a |
| | |variety of strategies, including tracing etymology |
| | |(ELA-1-H1) |
| |22a. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as fragments (ELA-3-H2) |
| |22b. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as run-on sentences (ELA-3-H2) |
| |23g. |Apply standard rules of usage, including using all |
| | |parts of speech appropriately (ELA-3-H2) |
| |26. |Use a variety of resources, such as dictionaries, |
| | |thesauruses, glossaries, technology, and textual |
| | |features (e.g., definitional footnotes, sidebars) to|
| | |verify word spellings (ELA-3-H3) |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 3: Writing Prompts to Make Real-Life Connections and to Assess |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Understanding (Ongoing) | | |
|Materials List: pen, learning logs/notebooks, index cards |05. |Explain ways in which ideas and information in a |
|Holt Teacher One Stop Planner | |variety of texts (e.g., scientific reports, |
|Holt Online models http://go.hrw.com/eolang/modbank/ | |technical guidelines, business memos, literary |
| | |texts) connect to real-life situations and other |
|Since writing is a process done in recursive stages, it is important that students receive | |texts (ELA-1-H4) |
|instruction in the writing craft through mini-lessons on target skills in descriptive and expository| | |
|writing. For this nonfiction unit, target skills should include writing compositions focusing on a | | |
|central idea with important ideas or events stated in a selected order, selecting an organizational | | |
|pattern (comparison/contrast, order of importance, chronological order) appropriate to the topic, | | |
|using elaboration techniques (anecdotes, relevant facts, examples, and/or specific details), and | | |
|using transitions to unify ideas and points. Students should keep a writer’s notebook or learning | | |
|log (view literacy strategy descriptions). In teaching students writing craft, the teacher should | | |
|first show them how accomplished writers use a particular skill, and then encourage students to | | |
|emulate those writers. | | |
| | | |
|Teacher will begin preparing the students to become good writers. Each writing workshop should | | |
|begin with a mini lesson. Establish the writing process as the basis for instruction. It’s always | | |
|writing process first, then the traits. Traits and the writing process fit together naturally. The | | |
|pre-writing phase of the traits is the perfect place to hammer home the importance of Ideas. The | | |
|teacher should help students generate ideas with any number of brainstorming techniques. When the | | |
|right topic and information has been generated, the student will do better. Drafting helps the | | |
|writer apply organization, word choice and sentence fluency to the first rush of ideas and voice. | | |
|Responding is enhanced by a traits based vocabulary that sharpens and enhances revision. When | | |
|students understand the language and criteria of traits, they have a variety of ways into the | | |
|revision process. Simply checking conventions and making a neat copy gives way to revision based on | | |
|all the traits. | | |
|Multiple response sessions may be needed, since the teacher will want to limit the response to one | | |
|trait at a time. Too much feedback will only confuse a writer. It's always better to keep the | | |
|feedback short and focused on one strength and one area for improvement. | | |
|Editing for conventions helps prepare the piece for formal assessment and publication, which ends | | |
|the writing cycle. | | |
|Teacher should teach or review the traits for effective writing. Students will learn the traits of | | |
|writing through the Writing Craft Mini-Lessons. Compare strong & weak writing examples for each | | |
|trait. Provide ample practice rewriting weak samples into strong samples. Have students score sample| | |
|papers. The 6+1 Trait® Writing analytical model for assessing and teaching writing is made up of | | |
|6+1 key qualities that define strong writing. These are: | | |
|Ideas, the main message; | | |
|Organization, the internal structure of the piece; | | |
|Voice, the personal tone and flavor of the author's message; | | |
|Word Choice, the vocabulary a writer chooses to convey meaning; | | |
|Sentence Fluency, the rhythm and flow of the language; | | |
|Conventions, the mechanical correctness; | | |
|Presentation, how the writing actually looks on the page. | | |
|Examples of typical mini lessons could include: word choice, usage, or conventions; techniques for | | |
|organizing; kinds of writings for students to try; writing as a process; pieces of writing that | | |
|demonstrate different techniques. Teacher should teach or review the traits for effective writing. | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|The teacher will create SPAWN prompts as students prepare to learn new information or reflect on | | |
|what has been learned. SPAWN (view literacy strategy descriptions) is an acronym that stands for | | |
|five categories of writing options (Special Powers, Problem Solving, Alternatives Viewpoints, What | | |
|If?, and Next). Using these categories, the teacher can create numerous thought-provoking and | | |
|meaningful prompts. This kind of writing usually calls for students to anticipate what will be | | |
|learned that day, as in the following prompts: | | |
| | | |
|Additionally, the teacher may have students write learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions)| | |
|entries to prompts (or ask questions) related to this topic: Connect an aspect of the story to | | |
|prior knowledge or real-life experiences or related text (e.g., as an initiation/motivational | | |
|activity, a check-for-understanding activity during reading and discussion, or a summative | | |
|activity/assessment). | | |
| | | |
|Along with using learning logs, students may respond to prompts on entrance cards, “Stop and | | |
|Writes,” and exit cards (writing-for-understanding strategies). They will then either submit the | | |
|response to the teacher for assessment or discuss the response with the whole class as initiation, | | |
|comprehension, or closure activities. | | |
| | | |
|Prompts should address comprehension and reasoning skills, higher-order thinking, and connections | | |
|between text and real-life experiences. Prompts can be used to begin discussions or for assessments.| | |
|During discussion, students use active listening strategies. Students should be encouraged to | | |
|identify strong insight provided by peers. | | |
| |10c. |Identify and explain in oral and written responses |
| | |ways in which particular genres reflect life |
| | |experiences, for example, a short story or novel |
| | |provides a vicarious life experience (ELA-6-H4) |
| |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
| | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |21d. |Write for various purposes, including text-supported|
| | |interpretations that connect life experiences to |
| | |works of literature (ELA-2-H6) |
| |32a. |Use active listening strategies, including |
| | |monitoring messages for clarity (ELA-4-H4) |
| |32b. |Use active listening strategies, including selecting|
| | |and organizing essential information (ELA-4-H4) |
| |35a. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including identifying the strengths and talents of |
| | |other participants (ELA-4-H6) |
| | |
| |Six Traits PowerPoint |
| |http://classroom.jc-schools.net/daleyl/6_Traits1.ppt |
| |Six Traits websites |
| |http://educationnorthwest.org/traits |
| |http://www.writingfix.com/ |
| |http://www.edina.k12.mn.us/concord/teacherlinks/sixtraits/sixt|
| |raits.html |
| |http://6traits.cyberspaces.net/ |
| |Write Source: Student Models: |
| |http://thewritesource.com/models.htm |
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| |Sample SPAWN prompts |
| | |
| |For example, the following prompts might be developed for a |
| |study of Seamus Heaney’s poem “Blackberry-picking.” |
| | |
| |P - Problem Solving When my mother and I picked blackberries, |
| |we quickly realized that mosquitoes, ticks and hornets can be |
| |big problems in a berry patch. Sometimes after several buckets|
| |were full, we looked back and the steers in the pasture were |
| |eating our blackberries. When we got home, we noticed that our|
| |arms and the backs of our hands looked as if we had been in a |
| |fight with a tiger! What can we do in order to have a better |
| |berry picking experience next time? |
| |S - Special Powers |
| |You have the power to change an event in your life that led to|
| |disappointment. Describe what event you would change, why you |
| |would change it, and the desired result. |
| |W - What If? |
| |What if every event in our lives ended happily? |
| |A - Alternative Viewpoints |
| |Imagine you’re the parent. Explain to your child the dangers |
| |of blackberry picking. |
| | |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 4: Grammar/Usage Mini-Lessons (Ongoing) |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: writing samples, textbook |22a. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
|Holt Language | |common errors, such as fragments (ELA-3-H2) |
|High-frequency words: http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hswriting/ | | |
| | | |
|Sample Mini-lesson | | |
|The teacher will explain that quotation marks are used to set off the title of a short written work | | |
|or parts of a longer work. Short works include short stories, chapters from a book, one-act plays,| | |
|short poems, essays, songs, and articles. Parts of a longer work include episodes in a series, | | |
|songs, parts of a longer music composition, or an item named as part of a collection. | | |
| | | |
|Several titles should be listed (void of punctuation) either on a board, projector, or activity | | |
|sheet. As a whole class or individually, students will discuss and determine which titles require | | |
|quotation marks and which titles require underlining. Ideally, samples of student writing which | | |
|include various titles would be displayed and discussed. | | |
| | | |
|Examples | | |
|Short Works: | | |
|"The Road Not Taken" (poem) | | |
|"God Bless America" (song) | | |
|"The Bet" by Anton Chekhov (short story) | | |
|"A Case for Change" (article) | | |
|"The Dance of the Sugarplum Fairy" (part of longer work) | | |
|Longer Works: | | |
|The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien (novel) | | |
|The Beautiful Letdown by Switchfoot (CD) | | |
|Sixteen Candles (movie/DVD) | | |
|The Times-Picayune (newspaper) | | |
| | | |
|Then, students will be instructed to apply the lesson by correctly using quotation marks to set off | | |
|the title of short works (specifically poems in this unit) when referenced in their own writing. | | |
| | | |
| |22b. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as run-on sentences (ELA-3-H2) |
| |22c. |Apply standard rules of sentence formation, avoiding|
| | |common errors, such as syntax problems (ELA-3-H2) |
| |24a. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |commas to set off appositives or parenthetical |
| | |phrases (ELA-3-H2) |
| |24b. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |quotation marks to set off titles |
| | |of short works (ELA-3-H2) |
| |24d. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |standard capitalization for names of political and |
| | |ethnic groups, religions, and continents (ELA-3-H2) |
| |25. |Use correct spelling conventions when writing and |
| | |editing (ELA-3-H3) |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 5: Speaking My Language |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: writing samples |03b. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| | |devices, including imagery (ELA-1-H2) |
|The teacher will facilitate a classroom discussion at the beginning of class period or activity on | | |
|sentence formation problems (i.e., fragments, run-ons, or syntax problems) or standard rules of | | |
|usage or mechanics (i.e., using quotation marks to set off titles of short works or correct spelling| | |
|conventions). Discussion will be based on the common errors in student writing samples. The | | |
|mini-lesson activities (which will be ongoing and skill specific) will incorporate any text which | | |
|features rhetorically significant use of the grammar/usage being taught and student-generated | | |
|writings. Ideally, the mini-lessons will become differentiated for students’ specific needs and | | |
|will be integrated within student writing assignments and not taught in isolation. | | |
| | | |
|Sample Mini-lesson | | |
|The teacher will explain that quotation marks are used to set off the title of a short written work | | |
|or parts of a longer work. Short works include short stories, chapters from a book, one-act plays,| | |
|short poems, essays, songs, and articles. Parts of a longer work include episodes in a series, | | |
|songs, parts of a longer music composition, or an item named as part of a collection. | | |
| | | |
|Several titles should be listed (void of punctuation) either on a board, projector, or activity | | |
|sheet. As a whole class or individually, students will discuss and determine which titles require | | |
|quotation marks and which titles require underlining. Ideally, samples of student writing which | | |
|include various titles would be displayed and discussed. | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Examples | | |
| | | |
|Short Works: | | |
|"The Road Not Taken" (poem) | | |
|"God Bless America" (song) | | |
|"The Bet" by Anton Chekhov (short story) | | |
| | | |
|"A Case for Change" (article) | | |
|"The Dance of the Sugarplum Fairy" (part of longer work) | | |
| | | |
|Longer Works: | | |
| | | |
|The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien (novel) | | |
| | | |
|The Beautiful Letdown by | | |
|Switchfoot (CD) | | |
| | | |
|Sixteen Candles (movie/DVD) | | |
| | | |
|The Times-Picayune (newspaper) | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
| | | |
|Then, students will be instructed to apply the lesson by correctly using quotation marks to set off | | |
|the title of short works (specifically poems in this unit) when referenced in their own writing. | | |
| |03g. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| | |devices, including implied metaphors (ELA-1-H2) |
| |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including poetry/epics (ELA-1-H3) |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including summarizing and paraphrasing |
| | |information and story elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| |11c. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including comparing and contrasting |
| | |complex literary elements, devices, and ideas within|
| | |and across texts (ELA-7-H1) |
| |12a. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |using supporting evidence to verify solutions |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 6: Making Inferences about a Poet’s Life |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen, paper, learning logs notebooks, several poems by one poet with biographical |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
|sketch, computer access | |written responses about ideas and information in |
|http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/ | |texts, including poetry/epics |
| | | |
|The whole class will read two to three poems by one poet (i.e., Maya Angelou’s poems Phenomenal | | |
|Woman, Still I Rise, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings), brainstorm (view literacy strategy | | |
|descriptions) the facts they know about the poet’s life from prior knowledge, and make inferences | | |
|about the poet and the poet’s life based on what has been gleaned from the poems. Students next work| | |
|in cooperative groups to determine which inferences they believe to be most accurate, supporting | | |
|their ideas with specific details from the poems. They then read a biographical sketch of the poet | | |
|(either teacher-selected or derived from an individual, online web search) and write a paragraph in | | |
|which they compare the facts to their inferences, distinguishing fact from opinion. | | |
| | | |
|Students will then write an autobiographical sketch and use that information to write a poem that | | |
|reflects their personal lives. Poems such as George Ella Lyon’s “Where I’m From” George Ella Lyons | | |
|- CARTS | | |
|or The Gift by Li-Young Lee or I Ask My Mother To Sing by Li-Young Lee | | |
|are examples of autobiographical poetry and may be read and imitated. | | |
|The teacher may copy and paste to a new document and enlarge the template for classroom use. | | |
| |09f. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including biographies and autobiographies |
| | |(ELA-6-H3) |
| |11c. |Demonstrate understanding of information - comparing|
| | |and contrasting complex literary elements, devices, |
| | |and ideas within and across texts (ELA-7-H1) |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information - making |
| | |inferences and drawing conclusions |
| |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
| | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| |13. |Identify and explain the impact of an author’s life |
| | |on themes and issues of a single text or multiple |
| | |texts by the same author |
| |14e. |Analyze information within and across |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using various reasoning |
| | |skills, including distinguishing facts from opinions|
| | |and probability (ELA-7-H4) |
| | |
| | |
| | |
|“Where I’m From” |“Where I’m From” |
|(Poem Template) | |
|I am from____ (specific ordinary item), |I am from_______________, from____________ and____________ |
|from_____ (product name) and____________ (product name) |I am from the______________________________________________ |
|I am from the___________________ (home description). |I am from the_________________, the________________ |
|_____________________________ (adjective, adjective; sensory detail.) |________________________________. |
|I am from the______________ (plant, flower, natural item), | |
|the________________ (plant, flower, natural item) |I’m from___________ (family tradition) and__________, ________ and_________.|
|________________________________ (description of the natural item). | |
|I’m from__________ (family tradition) and_________ (family trait), |I’m from the ________________________ and _________________. |
|from_____ (name family member) and________ (another name). |From_____________________________ and_________________________________ |
|I’m from the ________________________ (description of family |I’m from___________ _________________________________________ |
|tendency) and________________ (another), |I’m from____________________, |
|From_________________________(something you were told |From______________ and___________ |
|as a child) and_____________________________ (another). | |
|I’m from__________ (representation of religion -or lack of it) | |
|_________________________________________ (further description). | |
|I’m from___________________ (family ancestry), | |
|From______________ and_______________(two food items | |
|representing your fily). | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 7: The Effect of Sensory Imagery on Tone and Emotion |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen, paper, learning logs notebooks, imagery poems, video excerpt (If using Wilfred|03b. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
|Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est,” it could easily be paired with a video excerpt from a national | |devices, including imagery (ELA-1-H2) |
|newscast on a war-torn region such as Iraq.), Sensory Imagery Viewing Chart BLM | | |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | | |
| | | |
|Students will read a poem which appeals to several of the senses and then: | | |
|create a list of descriptive words or phrases (the language) used by the poet and identify the | | |
|senses to which each image appeals; or | | |
|identify sensory imagery on an individual copy of poetry, using hi-liters or colored pencils. | | |
| | | |
|Students will present lists/findings to the class and discuss the effect of the sensory imagery on | | |
|the tone of the poem and the emotional reaction of the reader. | | |
| | | |
|To examine tone further, students will view a media event (i.e., local or national newscast, talk | | |
|show with emotionally charged, classroom-appropriate content, or a candidate debate) and then | | |
|complete a sensory imagery viewing chart with columns for recording examples of sensory imagery. | | |
|Using the information from the chart, students will write a learning log (view literacy strategy | | |
|descriptions) entry in which they summarize and analyze the media event regarding its appeal to the | | |
|senses and the emotional reaction of the viewer. | | |
| | | |
|Finally, students will write a paragraph that compares and contrasts the two messages (poetry and | | |
|media) and the two responses. | | |
| | | |
|*Poems with Imagery: (The first three poems are simple, quick, and loaded with images.) | | |
|Atwood, Margaret, “You Fit Into Me” | | |
|Buson, Taniguchi, "The Piercing Chill I Feel" | | |
|The piercing chill I feel: | | |
|my dead wife's comb, in our bedroom, | | |
|under my heel. . . | | |
|Pound, Ezra, "In a Station at the Metro" | | |
|Owen, Wilfred, “Dulce et Decorum Est” | | |
|Pratt, E. J., “The Shark” | | |
| |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including poetry/epics (ELA-1-H3) |
| |11c. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including comparing and contrasting |
| | |complex literary elements, devices, and ideas within|
| | |and across texts (ELA-7-H1) |
| |12a. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |using supporting evidence to verify solutions |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
| | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |14a. |Analyze information within and across |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using various reasoning |
| | |skills, including identifying cause-effect |
| | |relationships (ELA-7-H4) |
| |34a. |Analyze media information in oral and written |
| | |responses, including summarizing the coverage of a |
| | |media event (ELA-4-H5) |
| |34b. |Analyze media information in oral and written |
| | |responses, including comparing messages from |
| | |different media (ELA-4-H5) |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 8: Figuratively Speaking . . . |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen, markers, paper, posters, learning logs notebooks, poems with figurative |03a. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
|language, poetry anthologies, literature texts, Figurative Language Project Rubrics BLM | |devices, including mixed metaphors (ELA-1-H2) |
|Access BLMs at http://secondaryela.jppss.k12.la.us/secondaryela-hscurriculum/ | | |
| | | |
|After a teacher-led review of figurative language (especially mixed and implied metaphors), students| | |
|will work in pairs or groups of three to read several poems and locate an example of at least three | | |
|of the following types of figurative language—simile, mixed and implied metaphors, imagery, | | |
|alliteration, personification, onomatopoeia, and hyperbole. A visit to the school library to search | | |
|poetry anthologies/collections and/or grade-level literature texts would provide appropriate | | |
|material. | | |
| | | |
|Next, the teacher should distribute and review the figurative language project rubrics sheet. | | |
|Groups will then select one of the figurative language examples and create a poster that includes | | |
|the line from the poem that contains the figure of speech, the definition of the figure of speech, | | |
|an interpretation of the figure of speech, and an illustration of the figure of speech. Groups will | | |
|prepare an oral presentation that is organized with an introduction, an explanation of their work, | | |
|and a conclusion. They will present their posters and oral reports to the class. | | |
| | | |
|Students will use one or more of the examples of figurative language as a springboard for creating a| | |
|poem containing one or more figures of speech, or students may work to incorporate a figure of | | |
|speech into the poem from Activity 6. | | |
| |03b. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| | |devices, including imagery (ELA-1-H2) |
| |03g. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| | |devices, including implied metaphors (ELA-1-H2) |
| |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including poetry/epics (ELA-1-H3) |
| |31c. |Deliver oral presentations that include an |
| | |organization that includes an introduction, relevant|
| | |details that develop the topic, and a conclusion |
| | |(ELA-4-H3) |
| |Poems with figurative language: |
| |Dove, Rita, “Grape Sherbet” |
| |Justice, Donald, “Incident in a Rose Garden” |
| |Millay, Edna St. Vincent, “The Courage That My Mother Had” |
| |Roethke, Theodore, “My Papa’s Waltz” |

| LCC UNIT 3 Activity 9: Free Verse vs. Structured Verse |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen, markers, paper, posters, learning logs, examples of free/blank/rhymed verse, |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
|graphic organizer | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including poetry/epics (ELA-1-H3) |
|Students will read poems written in free verse and poems written in rhymed or blank verse. The | | |
|teacher will discuss the following elements of form: | | |
|Free verse does not obviously rhyme and doesn't have a set meter. However, sound and rhythm are | | |
|still important. Patterns of syllables, sounds, meter, and repetition all have something to do with | | |
|the meaning of the poem. | | |
|Blank verse is any verse comprised of unrhymed lines all in the same meter, usually iambic | | |
|pentameter. | | |
|Rhymed verse consists of lines which rhyme at the end, usually in either an ABAB rhyme scheme or in | | |
|couplets or pairs. | | |
| | | |
|After reading several examples of the different forms of verse, students will work in cooperative | | |
|groups to create a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) such as a Venn diagram | | |
|that compares and contrasts the styles of the two poems. Then groups will use the diagrams to | | |
|determine: | | |
|which poem is easier to understand, | | |
|which form makes reading and comprehending easier, | | |
|which type of poem might lend itself to each format, and | | |
|which poems (from prior knowledge) utilize each format | | |
| | | |
|Groups will present their work for a class discussion. Students then complete a learning log entry | | |
|to this prompt: Identify the poem you prefer and give reasons for your choice. | | |
|Poems with free verse: | | |
|McCallum, Kit, “The Road Less Traveled” | | |
|Lorde, Audre, “Hanging Fire” | | |
|Poems with blank verse: | | |
|Shakespeare, William, “Tomorrow, …” Macbeth | | |
|Berryman, John, “The Ball Poem” | | |
|Poems with rhymed verse: | | |
|Lear, Edward, Miscellaneous Limericks | | |
|Unknown, “The Wife of Usher's Well” (ballad) | | |
|Denham, John, “Cooper’s Hill” (heroic couplet) | | |
|Donne, John, “A Lame Beggar” and “Hero and Leander” (epigrams) | | |
| |11c. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including comparing and contrasting |
| | |complex literary elements, devices, and ideas within|
| | |and across texts (ELA-7-H1) |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making inferences and drawing |
| | |conclusions (ELA-7-H1) |
| |14a. |Analyze information within and across |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using various reasoning |
| | |skills, including identifying cause-effect |
| | |relationships (ELA-7-H4) |
| |19. |Develop paragraphs and complex, multiparagraph |
| | |compositions using all modes of writing |
| | |(description, narration, exposition, and persuasion)|
| | |emphasizing exposition and persuasion (ELA-2-H4) |
| |39c. |Access information and conduct research using |
| | |various grade-appropriate, data-gathering |
| | |strategies/tools, including using graphic organizers|
| | |(e.g., outlining, charts, timelines, webs) |
| | |(ELA-5-H3) |
| | | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 10: Paragraph Analysis of a Symbol |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen, markers, paper, posters, learning logs notebooks, sample poems with symbols, |03c. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
|sample of correct letter format | |devices, including symbolism (ELA-1-H2) |
| | | |
|The teacher will discuss and model (e.g., using a poem with an obvious symbol) appropriate | | |
|oral-presentation elements (including envisioning the images, pausing slightly at line breaks, | | |
|conveying tone and emotion by varying voice, etc.). Students will then volunteer to read aloud | | |
|several poems, preferably by the same poet, that are developed with a symbol (conventional or | | |
|contextual), and participate in a discussion of each poem. This discussion should reinforce the | | |
|distinctive elements of poetry (with emphasis on symbol) addressed in Activity 5. | | |
| | | |
|After reading and discussing the poems, students will write a one- to two-paragraph analysis of one | | |
|of the symbols. The analysis should include the following: an explanation of how the symbol affects| | |
|the meaning of the poem, a discussion of whether the symbolism is effective or ineffective, and | | |
|specific details that support students’ views. | | |
|Finally, after samples and a review of correct letter format, students will write letters of praise | | |
|or complaint to the poet regarding the use of symbolism in a poem or across several poems. | | |
| | | |
|*Poems with symbols: PREVIEW WEBSITES | | |
|Frost, Robert, “The Road Not Taken” CPP - The Road not Taken - Robert Frost | | |
|Parker, Dorothy, “One Perfect Rose” Parker, "One Perfect Rose" | | |
|Soto, Gary, “The Map” The Map by Gary Soto : The Poetry Foundation | | |
|Swenson, May, “Fable for When There Is No Way Out” 999 Poems: 882. Fable For When There's No Way | | |
|Out, by May Swenson | | |
| | | |
|Teacher Note: Conventional symbols have meanings that are widely recognized by a society or culture.| | |
|Some conventional symbols are a cross or a nation’s flag. A literary or contextual symbol can be a | | |
|setting, character, action, object, name, or anything else in a work that maintains its literal | | |
|significance while suggesting other meanings. Such symbols go beyond conventional symbols; they gain| | |
|their symbolic meaning within the context of a specific story. (Source: Bedford/St. Martin’s | | |
|Glossary of Literary Terms, www.bedfordstmartins.com.) | | |
| |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including poetry/epics (ELA-1-H3) |
| |11e. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making inferences and drawing |
| | |conclusions (ELA-7-H1) |
| |11f. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including making predictions and |
| | |generalizations |
| |12a. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
| | |using supporting evidence to verify solutions |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
| |14d. |Analyze information within and across |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using various reasoning |
| | |skills, including generating a theory or hypothesis |
| | |(ELA-7-H4) |
| |21a. |Write for various purposes, including formal and |
| | |business letters, such as letters of complaint and |
| | |requests for information (ELA-2-H6) |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 11: The Sonnet (GLEs: 03b, 04d, 09c, 11a, 14a, 35b) |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen, markers, paper, posters, learning logs notebooks, sonnet samples |03b. |Identify and explain the significance of literary |
| | |devices, including imagery (ELA-1-H2) |
|The teacher will introduce the study of the sonnet with a review of its form and characteristics, | | |
|then model an analysis of a sonnet by explaining its structure, the use of imagery and figurative | | |
|language, and the development of the main idea. | | |
| | | |
|The entire class will read a sonnet (possibly an excerpt from The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet since | | |
|it will most likely be studied in the upcoming drama unit) and analyze its structure, imagery, | | |
|figurative language, and meaning. In cooperative groups, students will read a different sonnet from | | |
|the other groups, which they paraphrase and analyze in writing (i.e., single- or multi-paragraph | | |
|report, learning log) focusing on the effect of the imagery on the meaning. Students will take | | |
|various roles in reporting their work to the entire class for discussion. Roles may include: | | |
|reading the original sonnet | | |
|reading the paraphrased version | | |
|reporting the groups’ analysis | | |
|fielding questions from audience | | |
|Teacher Notes: | | |
|Italian/Petrarchan sonnet (i.e., Petrarch) form consists of an eight-line octet and a six-line | | |
|sestet; the rhyme scheme for the octet is ABBA ABBA, and the purpose of the octet is to present a | | |
|situation or a problem. The rhyme scheme for the sestet can be either CDECDE or CDCDCD, and the | | |
|purpose of the sestet is to comment on or resolve the situation or problem posed in the octet. It is| | |
|traditionally in iambic pentameter. (e.g., Donald Justice’s "Sonnet: The Poet at Seven”) | | |
|Spenserian sonnet (i.e., Spenser) form uses the rhyme scheme ABAB BCBC CDCD EE, and there does not | | |
|appear to be a requirement that the initial octet sets up a problem which the closing sestet | | |
|answers. Instead, the form is treated as three quatrains (linked by the connected rhyme scheme | | |
|described above) followed by a couplet. Again, iambic pentameter is used. (e.g., Edmund Spenser’s | | |
|“One day I wrote her name upon the strand”) | | |
|English sonnet form (i.e., Shakespearean) is one in which the situation or problem presented in the | | |
|octave is now dealt with tentatively in the next four lines and summarily in the terminal couplet. | | |
|Some English sonnets may even be developed through a series of three examples in three quatrains | | |
|with a conclusion in the couplet. The rhyme scheme of the English sonnet is ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. (e.g.| | |
|William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 18: Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?”) | | |
| |04d. |Draw conclusions and make inferences in oral and |
| | |written responses about ideas and information in |
| | |texts, including poetry/epics (ELA-1-H3) |
| |09c. |Analyze in oral and written responses distinctive |
| | |elements (including theme, structure, |
| | |characterization) of a variety of literary forms and|
| | |types, including forms of lyric and narrative poetry|
| | |such as ballads and sonnets (ELA-6-H3) |
| |11a. |Demonstrate understanding of information in |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using a variety of |
| | |strategies, including summarizing and paraphrasing |
| | |information and story elements (ELA-7-H1) |
| | | |
| |14d. |Analyze information within and across |
| | |grade-appropriate texts using various reasoning |
| | |skills, including generating a theory or hypothesis |
| | |(ELA-7-H4) |
| |35b. |Participate in group and panel discussions, |
| | |including acting as facilitator, recorder, leader, |
| | |listener, or mediator (ELA-4-H6) |
| | |

|LCC UNIT 3 Activity 12: Researching to Connect the Poet’s World to His/Her Life |GLE # |GLE/RESOURCES |
|Materials List: pen, markers, paper, posters, learning logs notebooks, library (media center), |12b. |Solve problems using reasoning skills, including |
|poetry anthologies, computer access, sample web source citation, quotation marks mini-lesson from | |analyzing the relationships between prior knowledge |
|Activity 4 | |and life experiences and information in texts |
| | |(ELA-7-H2) |
|Students will visit the school library to peruse poetry anthologies/collections. For the assignment | | |
|that follows, collections by well-known poets will be especially useful. Students will read/skim | | |
|poetry books round robin style (i.e., read ten minutes, pass book to peer, read ten minutes) making | | |
|note of poems of interest. | | |
| | | |
|Students will individually conduct a web search to locate at least two poems (or copy poems from | | |
|book, if not available online) by the same poet and access sources that detail basic facts about the| | |
|poet’s life, times, and philosophy. Using the facts, students will create a profile of the poet, | | |
|including correct citations for sources, and present their profiles to the class for discussion. | | |
|Finally, students will use writing processes to develop a two- to three-paragraph essay that | | |
|discusses at least one element, event, or characteristic of the poet’s life that is reflected in his| | |
|or her poems and is supported with relevant details from the poem and the biographical information. | | |
|Students should use the writing process, correct spelling conventions, and appropriate quotation | | |
|marks to set off titles of short poems when writing and editing. | | |
| |13. |Identify and explain the impact of an author’s life |
| | |on themes and issues of a single text or multiple |
| | |texts by the same author (ELA-7-H3) |
| |24b. |Apply standard rules of mechanics, including using |
| | |quotation marks to set off titles of short works |
| | |(ELA-3-H2) |
| |25. |Use correct spelling conventions when writing and |
| | |editing (ELA-3-H3) |
| |37b. |Locate, analyze, and synthesize information from |
| | |electronic sources (e.g., Web sites, databases) |
| | |(ELA-5-H2) |
| | |

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...POL1EEH International Relations and the Global Economy Take Home Examination 2 November 2012 INSTRUCTIONS: The examination is worth 35% of the final mark for this unit. Students are to answer ONE question from SECTION A and ONE question from SECTION B, each in essay format, independently. Each essay should be approximately 750 words and should be referenced appropriately. Each essay will constitute 50% of the mark for this piece of assessment. Completed exams should be submitted to the Essay Box in the Politics and International Relations Program Office no later than 5pm on Monday 5 November and also lodged electronically via the Turnitin link on LMS. As this is an examination there will be no extensions. Any exams submitted after the due date will receive 0% for this piece of work. If circumstances befall a student during the examination that prevent timely completion, students should contact Dr Jon Symons (J.Symons@latrobe.edu.au) with written evidence of the problem and an alternative time to complete the examination will be arranged. QUESTIONS: SECTION A 1. To what extent have the main features of the global economic order established after World War II been transformed by globalization? 2. ‘The failure of so many multilateral institutions reflects not just the problems of those institutions but the shortcomings of multilateralism more generally.’ Critically evaluate this claim in relation to ONE multilateral institution. 3. To what extent do liberal ideas retain their......

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...There are some teachers who are going to require you to write a 250 word essay. Actually, it is a very short essay for that matter but for some students, it may also be a burden to have a word limit in writing. Let us take a look at the scenarios that you need to understand to compose a well developed essay. For some students, it may be limiting to have a word factor quota in writing an article. There are some individuals who can tell more out of a topic and that having 250 words will not suffice to tell everything in their minds. That is why you need to have the skills in budgeting the words that you have to write without sacrificing the ideas that you have to deliver. There are different essay types that you also need to consider so having a word limit cannot simply be an easy task. Still for some students, a 250 word essay may mean too much because there are also some people who do not want to waste their time writing. No matter what the essay structure may be, these types of people are not really eager to translate their thoughts to written form so they think 250 words simply equates to too much work. Anyway, you need to understand that having this kind of limit will eventually benefit the students as they improve their discipline, being responsible and being resourceful individuals. We can offer you to buy essays from us so you do not have to worry about the number of words in writing. Let our writers make your life easier today...

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...An essay is usually a short piece of writing. It is often written from an author's personal point of view. Essays can be literary criticism, political manifestos, learned arguments, observations of daily life, recollections, and reflections of the author. The definition of an essay is vague, overlapping with those of an article and a short story. Almost all modern essays are written in prose, but works in verse have been dubbed essays (e.g. Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism and An Essay on Man). While brevity usually defines an essay, voluminous works like John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Thomas Malthus's An Essay on the Principle of Population provide counterexamples. It is very difficult to define the genre into which essays fall. Aldous Huxley, a leading essayist, gives guidance on the subject: Like the novel, the essay is a literary Abstract This article will examine the reasons why it is important both linguistically and psychologically to build a vocabulary quickly when learning a foreign language. The article asserts that very little can be achieved or learned in a foreign language with a small vocabulary and that by building a sizable vocabulary quite quickly one can soon be able to function adequately. You may also wish to look at http://www.jalt-publications.org/tlt/files/95/feb/meara.html   Introduction   It is obvious that in order to learn a foreign language one needs to learn many many words. But how many?......

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...to write A Level Sociology Essay Assessment With reference to the present AEB syllabus, there are three main skills being assessed in your essays. 1. Knowledge and Understanding (9 marks) 2. Interpretation and Application (9 marks) 3. Evaluation (9 marks) What Does This Mean? What this means is that for writing an essay is that the content (studies, names of researcher, dates, figures, concepts, although important need to be organised coherently, applied to a variety of social situations and interpreted, and expressed in a critical fashion. You must be aware of the skills being highlighted in the question in order to use the appropriate skills in your essays. You should also practice writing essays regularly and develop a technique which addresses the skills required so that you can actually answer the question set. I hope that this handout should allow you to achieve this. Stage One Many students are too quick into diving into an answer. They have focused on certain key terms and ‘assumed’ what the essay requires from a quick look at the question. Instead, the question should be read a number of times. Task One With the title provided. Analyze the question by underlining the key features in the essay title Double underline the skills being assessed, e.g., describe and explain Identify any terms or concepts contained in the question. These terms will need to be defined, i.e. concepts such as interactionists. Essay questions will also......

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...Studieportalen.dk? Klik her for at oprette en bruger. Kommentarer til Save as many as you ruin - Essay * Kommentar #1 12. oktober 2012 Af IsabellaFF Wow, hvordan er du blevet så god til engelsk? :) Hvis jeg må spørge - du må have et eller andet trick. :D ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst på formularen * Kommentar #2 24. november 2011 Af benjaminpetersen Fantastisk essay. Fortjent 12-tal. Grunden til at forrige kommentar, tror at du kobler det med Helligtrekongersdag, kunne være fordi at ordet "epiphany" både kan oversættes til førnævnte, men også betyde en slags åbenbaring. (Sudden realization) Men igen, super essay :) ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst på formularen vis/skjul svar * 01. januar 1 Af Longarm Tak Benjamin, - og skarpt observeret! Nu giver det mere mening. :) God weekend! * Kommentar #3 28. august 2011 Af Fiierne Virkelig flot essay. Noget jeg ikke helt fanger er hvordan du kobler det sammen med Helligtrekongersdag? ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst på formularen vis/skjul svar * 01. januar 1 Af Longarm Hvorfor skulle jeg det? :) Det må være en ekstra opgave i er blevet stillet :) * Kommentar #4 17. juni 2011 Af backus Et virkeligt velskrevet og rammende essay. ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst......

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...------------------------------------------------- Red River College ECE Program ECED-2009 Research Essay Assignment Value: 30% Select a topic related to Early Childhood Education for this assignment. The list on the following page may be helpful for some ideas, although you are not restricted to these topics. Approve your topic with your instructor by: _______ . Duplication of topics will not be allowed, and topic choice is on a first-come, first-served basis. Search for resources related to this topic. Check the Learning Centre, as well as the Library. Conduct an Internet search. For your paper, you need a minimum of 4 current (less than 8 years old) references. Include a minimum of one of each of the following: - book - scholarly journal article (from EBSCOHOST or other scholarly database) - reliable internet source. Use the APA style of documentation (see text) to write a 3 - 4 page paper. Include an introduction, thesis statement, body (that includes background information and at least 3 points of discussion), a conclusion, and a reference page. The reference page is not included in the length. You will also complete a 5 minute presentation to the class based on your research. Refer to Considerations for Effective Presentations. Use peer editing as part of your writing process. That is, when you have a draft completed, ask at least one peer to provide feedback using the peer editing rubric. Be mindful of the peer’s......

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...paragraph. The idea is to allow the author to develop an argument and support it with ideas. • Stated first and last The topic sentence appears both at the beginning and at the end. It is a technique that is used by authors in cases where the content of the paragraph is complex. The topic sentence that appears at the end aims to remind the readers about the content in the paragraph so that they do not loose focus. • Stated implied This is a situation where an author states an obvious topic sentence to avoid being direct. In this case, the topic sentence is not conspicuous. The readers have to read in between the lines to identify the hidden topic sentence. 13. Paragraphs are the building blocks of coherent, authoritative and well-developed essays. An adequately developed paragraph should contain the following four details; Topic sentence This is a sentence that traditionally appears as the first sentence. However, the topic sentence could also appear at the end, in the middle, at the beginning and at the end or implied. It informs the reader the subject matter of the paragraph. The reader is in a position to internalize what to expect in the paragraph. In addition, the topic sentence substantiates the thesis statement. Conclusion This is a summarizing sentence that comes at the end of the paragraph. The sentence wraps up the argument developed in the paragraph and gives a summary. The conclusion helps the reader to connect the argument that is being developed and......

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...Lindsay Apedaile Ms. Brown English 1020 2 November 2015 4.1 Ravisankar begins his essay by describing consumers and their want for low prices then describes sweatshops and their conditions. The problem he identifies is consumers demand lower prices to do this, corporations cut the cost on their employees either decreasing their wages or worsening their working conditions. Ravisankar assumes his readers are poor college students looking for lower prices and have a basic understanding of what a sweatshop is but does not fully know the appalling conditions of sweatshops. His purpose in this essay is to raise awareness of the degrading environment of sweatshops. In order to accomplish this purpose, he appeals mainly to pathos an appeal to emotions by mentioning how bad sweatshop working conditions are and its consumer’s. He also appeals to logos when he writes that people should have equal rights as others like pay. In this essay, Ravisankar addresses the main argument against his thesis the idea that the big companies like Nike, Reebox, and Gap are to blame for decreasing conditions in sweatshops. He refutes this argument by saying these companies are taking apart of “the race to the bottom” the pressure for low costs. Finally, he concludes by making the point that universities purchase around $3 billion in clothing with the universities name on it. This puts pressure on the companies to provide living wages and reasonable working. Overall, the argument Ravisankar makes...

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...How to Write a Religious Studies Essay The first thing to understand when approaching an essay in religious studies is the unique nature of the discipline. Apart from its distinctive subject matter, the interdisciplinary nature of the field makes the study of religion both fascinating and highly challenging. The academic study of religion requires more than knowledge of individual texts, beliefs and practices, and may draw upon fields as diverse as history, sociology, anthropology, hermeneutics, and linguistics. For this reason, your instructors will expect you to familiarise yourself with and be able to employ a variety of different theories and methods. The interdisciplinary nature of the subject is also reflected in the various kinds of essays you will be asked to write, which may include a mixture of comparative, textual, ethnographic, hermeneutical, sociological and historical approaches. The academic study of religion takes place in a secular rather than a faith-based context. Since it aims to understand religion from a perspective that can be shared by all, and limits itself to evidence that is available to all, you will not be required to try to prove or refute particular religious beliefs. As an interdisciplinary academic subject, religious studies employs historical, textual, cultural, sociological and anthropological methods to contextualise, interpret and understand religious beliefs, practices, traditions and communities. As such, it is important......

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...steps in the scientific method? Type your response here: 4. Why did most Medieval philosophers and scientists feel that experimentation was unnecessary? Type your response here: 5. Why did the Enlightenment writer Voltaire get into so much trouble in France and elsewhere? Type your response here: Part 2 Write a well-developed essay of two to three paragraphs on one of the topics below. Make sure you use specific information from this lesson and, if need be, from previous lessons. Proofread your essay to eliminate errors in grammar and spelling. (Each question is worth 15 points) 1. Choice #1: Compare and contrast the careers of Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton. What discoveries did each make? How were their methods similar or different? How were both received by the religious and political authorities of the day? A complete answer will include an assessment of the political and cultural climate in which each thinker lived.  Choice#2: Write an essay explaining how the Scientific Revolution influenced Enlightenment thinkers in other disciplines. Your essay should mention at least two of the following thinkers and topics: divine right of kings, empiricism, Vesalius, Descartes, Hobbes, or Voltaire. Type your response here: ----------------------- Submission ----------------------- © 2013 EDMENTUM, INC....

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...How to determine custom essay editing company that is legitimate This is the company you will find great editors to provide you with custom essay editing service. Students whose first language is not English may find speaking and writing in English as a difficult task for them. Most of these students are international students who have enrolled in various universities in America and in the UK. The main teaching language is English, American and Standard English respectively. It is essential for students to master well the language of instruction because it is a medium through which they are required to write their assignments and speak in classroom. Competence and fluency in English language will help students to read and understand the teaching material provided to them. It is important therefore for students to ask for support from custom essay editing services which deal with the tips of writing good essays among other academic papers and also to write for them assignment essays. Our writing and editing services is created both for students and professionals. We deal with both the non academic and academic editing and writing services to fulfill your needs. At our custom essay editing, you will find editors who are qualified in linguistics and English language. We are ready to provide you the custom essay editing service at any time of the day or night because we operate as a 24/7 service. Our custom essay editing service comprises of creative thinkers, skillful......

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...Der Essay Was ist ein Essay? Nach der Duden-Definition ist ein Essay eine Abhandlung, die eine literarische oder wissenschaftliche Frage in knapper und anspruchsvoller Form behandelt. Einen Essay schreiben heißt also wissenschaftliches Schreiben, eine kritische Auseinandersetzung mit einem Thema. Ausgangspunkt für einen kritischen Essay ist in der Regel ein Problem, eine strittige Frage oder eine These, die in dem Essay dann bewusst subjektiv diskutiert werden soll. Dabei benötigt der Einstieg in den Essay/in das Thema einen Aufhänger. Das kann ein aktuelles Ereignis sein, oder auch eine persönliche Begebenheit. Es muss klar werden, warum Sie sich zu diesem Zeitpunkt mit dem gewählten Thema auseinandersetzen und weshalb Sie dem Thema eine gewisse Relevanz zusprechen. Anforderungen an einen Essay Das Schreiben von Essays soll die kritische Beurteilung und das Abwägen wissenschaftlicher Positionen fördern; dabei wird kein Anspruch auf vollständige Darstellung in allen Details erhoben, wichtiger ist die Betrachtung des Gegenstandes in einem größeren Gesamtzusammenhang. Mehr noch als bei Hausarbeiten muss man daher zwischen Wichtigem und Unwichtigem unterscheiden. Als AutorIn hat man damit die Möglichkeit, wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse zusammen mit eigenen persönlichen Beobachtungen und Eindrücken zu schildern. Im Mittelpunkt steht jedoch die wissenschaftliche Argumentation, die zum Ausgangspunkt für Ergänzungen und Überlegungen genommen wird.......

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