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In: Philosophy and Psychology

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Consumer
Information Guide
2015–2016

August 2015

Table of Contents
Consumer Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
About University of Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Accreditation, Licensures, Reviews and Approvals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Federal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Regional Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
State and International Licensures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
School of Business/Business Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
College of Health Professions: School of Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
College of Education/Education Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
College of Social Sciences/Counseling Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Academic Programs, Facilities and Instructional Personnel Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Academic Program Improvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Articulation Agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Corporate Articulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Credit Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Reverse Transfer Agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Disability Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Obtain Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Graduation Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Retention Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Student Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Types of Education in Which Graduates Enroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Alumni Attending Graduate School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Working Alumni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Alumni Occupations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Title II of Higher Education Act — Academic Year 2012–2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Title II HEA Pass-Rate Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Program Information for Academic Year 2013–2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Federal Financial Aid Application Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Statement of Educational Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Referrals to the Office of Inspector General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Federal, State and Institutional Financial Aid Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
General Eligibility Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

I

Student/Parent Eligibility Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
High School Diploma or Equivalent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Loan Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Drug Convictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Incarcerated Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Title IV Eligibility for Incarcerated Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Cost of Attendance for Incarcerated Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Regaining Title IV Eligibility for Incarcerated Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Citizenship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Secondary Confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Overpayments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Selective Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Unusual Enrollment History (UEH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Approval of Continued Eligibility for UEH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Denial of Continued Eligibility for UEH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Regaining Eligibility for UEH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Parental Nonsupport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Dependency Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
PLUS Exceptional Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Eligibility for Direct and PLUS Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Grant Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Federal Grant Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Federal Pell Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant (IASG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant Program . . 23
State Grant Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Institutional Grant Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Institutional Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
External Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Federal Direct Loan (DL) Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Federal Direct PLUS Loan for Parent(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Federal Direct PLUS Loan for Graduate and
Professional Degree Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized
Annual Loan Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Federal Education Loan Interest Rates and Origination Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Interest Rate Cap for Military Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Prior Federal Loans and Financial Aid History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Private Student Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Financial Aid Awarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Schedule Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

II

Advancing Programs Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Advancing Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
New Academic Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Overlapping Academic Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
External Transfer Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
External Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Federal Pell Grant Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Program Changes Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
If All Five Conditions Are Met . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
If All Five Conditions Are Not Met . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Change After Payment Period Is Completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Change Effective Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Version Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42
42
42
42
44
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Re-entry Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Re-entry Within 180 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Re-entry Within 180 Days and in a New Federal Award Year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Re-entry After 180 days or Re-entry into a Different Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Consortium Agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Cost of Attendance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Course Materials and Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Living Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
End of Program Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loan Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incarcerated Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tribal Budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Minnesota Child Care Budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48
49
49
49
49
49
49
50
50
50

Grade-Level Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Conflicting Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Other Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Satisfactory Academic Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Satisfactory Academic Progress for DVA Education Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Academic Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Academic Disqualification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Federal Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Qualitative Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Qualitative Exclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Quantitative Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Professional Judgment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

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Determining Enrollment at the University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Academically Related Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Institutionally Scheduled Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Course Attendance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Online Class Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Local Campus Class Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Directed Study Class Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
FlexNet Class Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
School of Advanced Studies Class Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Unexcused Absence Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Leave of Absence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Required Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
HEROES Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Extending an LOA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Institutionally Scheduled Breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Disbursements During an LOA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Completion of Coursework upon Return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Failure to Return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Financial Aid Disbursements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Federal Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Application of Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Financial Aid Authorization to Hold Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Application of Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Disbursement for Books and Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Cancellation of Federal Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Federal Financial Aid Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Federal Direct Loan Entrance Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Federal Direct Loan Exit Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Federal Perkins Loan Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Federal Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education Grant Counseling . . . 66
Federal Loan Repayment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Prior Federal Student Loan Deferments (Postponing Payments) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Loan Payment Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Federal Student Loan Consolidation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Federal Student Loan Forgiveness, Cancellation and Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Veterans Educational Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Credit for Prior Education and Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Military Tuition Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
DVA Tuition Assistance Top-Up Benefit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Readmission of Servicemembers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Re-entry Policy for Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

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Student Financial Responsibilities, Policies and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Student Financial Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Finance Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meeting Financial Plan Obligations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Course Materials and Books Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Financial Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple-Tuition Discount Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Refund Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Payment Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Returned Check Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Late Payment Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Financial Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Federal Financial Aid Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Military or Government Billing Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Third-Party Billing Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuition Deferral Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tribal Funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

72
72
72
72
72
72
73
73
73
73
73
73
73
74
74
74
74
74
74
74

Withdrawing from the University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Official Withdrawals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Withdrawal Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Date of Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rescission of Official Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unofficial Withdrawals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Withdrawal Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Date of Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administrative Withdrawals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Withdrawal Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Date of Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Academic Related Activities That Occur During an Institutionally Scheduled Break . . . . . . . . .
Withdrawal Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Date of Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75
75
75
75
75
76
76
76
76
77
77
77
77
77
77

Return of Federal Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Return Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Conditions for a Late Disbursement (Including Post Withdrawal Disbursements) . . . . . . . . . . 79
Inadvertent Overpayments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Verification and the Return Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Institutionally Scheduled Breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
When Funds Are Disbursed Using Different Payment Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Percentage of Federal Financial Aid Earned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Rate of Progression Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Total Calendar Days Completed in the Payment Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Required Adjustments to Calendar Days Completed in the Payment Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Total Calendar Days in the Payment Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Required Adjustments to Calendar Days in the Payment Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

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Rate of Progression Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bachelor’s Program Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rate of Progression Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Title IV Credit Balance and the Return Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Return of Unearned Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timelines for Return of Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deceased Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

82
82
82
82
83
84
84

Tuition Refund Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Institutional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Kansas or Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Consumer Policies and Codes of Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
University of Phoenix Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Access to Education Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Releasable Information — Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Information Not Released — Non-Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Student Right to Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Solomon Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Gainful Employment Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Student Loan Code of Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Student Code of Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Consumer Privacy Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Scope of Privacy Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Information Collected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Information Uses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Your Rights and Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
How to Contact Us or Access Your Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Dispute Resolution Policy and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Step One: Internal Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Step Two: Mediation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Step Three: Binding Arbitration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
State Authorization and Contact Information for Filing Complaints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

VI

Copyright Infringement and Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Copyright Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Copyright Infringement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Peer-to-Peer File Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Violations and Penalties Under Federal Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
The University Plans to Effectively Combat Unauthorized Distribution of Copyrighted Material; Student Sanctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Education and Awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Legal Sources for Online Music and Videos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Digital Millennium Copyright Act Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Filing Notice of Alleged Infringement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Filing Counter Notification of Alleged Infringement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Vaccinations and Immunizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Register to Vote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Campus Safety and Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Campus Safety Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Campus Crime Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Statement of Policy on Sex Offender Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Florida Sexual Predator and Sexual Offender Registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Emergency Mass Notification Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Campus Security Authority Contact List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Prohibition of Illicit Drug Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Federal Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Penalties for Drug Convictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
How to Reduce the Period of Eligibility or Regain Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Qualified Drug Rehabilitation Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Convictions for Offense That Occurred During Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Institutional Sanctions for Alcohol and Drug Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

VII

Consumer Information
All institutions participating in federal financial aid programs are required to provide enrolled and potential students and current and prospective employees available consumer information.
This guide provides you with important information and institutional policies. Where applicable, each section lists specific locations where additional information is available. To request and receive this information in writing, contact the campus director or designee at each University of Phoenix location during regular business hours. A list of campus locations is available at http://www.phoenix.edu/campus_locations.html About University of Phoenix
Accreditation, Licensures, Reviews and Approvals
University of Phoenix is accredited, reviewed and/or approved by federal, state and international agencies, as well as private accreditation bodies.

Federal
U.S. Department of Education, Certificate of Eligibility
University of Phoenix has been approved by the Department of Education to participate in each of the following listed Title IV HEA programs:





Federal Pell Grant Program
Federal Direct Student Loan Program
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program
Federal TEACH Grant Program

Regional Accreditation
University of Phoenix is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (http://hlcommission.org).
Since 1978, University of Phoenix has been continually accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and its predecessor. University of Phoenix obtained its most recent 10-year Reaffirmation of
Accreditation in 2012–13. A comprehensive evaluation is scheduled for 2016–17, and the next
Reaffirmation of Accreditation is scheduled for 2022–23.
For more information about University of Phoenix accreditations and licensures, please visit http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/accreditation.html. HLC/NCA
230 S. LaSalle St., Ste. 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604-1413
Phone: 312.263.0456 800.621.7440
Fax: 312.263.7462 http://www.ncahlc.org Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

1

State and International Licensures
University of Phoenix is approved to operate in most U.S. states, territories and possessions, either through licensure, registration, general or specific approvals, or annual extension of exemption.
Alabama Commission on Higher Education
Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education
Arkansas Department of Higher Education
California Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education
Colorado Department of Higher Education, Commission on Higher Education
Connecticut Office of Higher Education
Delaware Department of Education
Government of the District of Columbia, Education Licensure Commission
Florida Commission for Independent Education
Georgia Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission
State of Hawaii Post-Secondary Education Authorization Program (HPEAP) from State of Hawaii, Office of the Governor
Idaho State Board of Education
Illinois Board of Higher Education
Indiana Board for Proprietary Education
Iowa College Student Aid Commission
Kansas Board of Regents
Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education
State of Louisiana Board of Regents
Maryland Higher Education Commission
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Board of Higher Education
State of Michigan Department of Education, Postsecondary Services
Minnesota Office of Higher Education
Mississippi Commission on College Accreditation
State of Missouri Coordinating Board of Higher Education
Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education
Nevada State Commission on Postsecondary Education
New Jersey Secretary of Higher Education
New Mexico Higher Education Department
Board of Governors for the University of North Carolina
Ohio Board of Regents
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
Oregon Office of Degree Authorization
Pennsylvania Department of Education
Consejo de Educación Superior de Puerto Rico/Puerto Rico Council on Higher Education
South Carolina Commission on Higher Education
Tennessee Higher Education Commission
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
Utah System of Higher Education State Board of Regents
The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
State of Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission
State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Board
Wyoming Department of Education
For additional information on state and international licensures visit http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/accreditation.html Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Program Accreditation
School of Business/Business Programs
The University of Phoenix School of Business offers the following programs that are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP): Associate of Arts in Business
Foundations, Associate of Arts in Accounting Foundations, Bachelor of Science in Business, Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Master of Business Administration, Master of Management, Master of
Science in Accountancy, Doctor of Business Administration and Doctor of Management.
ACBSP
11520 W. 119th St.
Overland Park, KS 66213
Phone: 913.339.9356 http://www.acbsp.org College of Health Professions: School of Nursing
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Master of Science in Nursing programs are accredited by the
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).
CCNE
One Dupont Cir. NW, Ste. 530
Washington, DC 20036-1120
Phone: 202.887.6791 http://www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation College of Education/Education Programs
University of Phoenix initial degree programs lead to teaching certification (Early Childhood,
Elementary, Middle Level, Secondary and Special Education) in certain states. The College of Education offers state-approved initial programs in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Nevada,
New Mexico, Texas and Utah. The College of Education offers state-approved advanced programs in
Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah. Individual programs vary by state, and not all programs are available at all locations or in both online and on-campus modalities.
Candidates may request an institutional recommendation upon successful completion of their program (academic and program requirements). Candidates should check with their state agency for any state-specific requirements, including the acceptability of the University’s initial programs in any state in which they intend to seek licensure or certification. Program requirements are subject to change based on state certification requirements. Please speak to a campus representative for a listing of programs available at each campus location.

College of Social Sciences/Counseling Programs
The Master of Science in Counseling program with a specialization in Clinical Mental Health
Counseling (Phoenix and Southern Arizona Campuses) and the Master of Science in Counseling program in Mental Health Counseling (Utah Campuses) are accredited by the Council for
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
CACREP
1001 North Fairfax St., Ste. 510
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703.535.5990 http://www.cacrep.org Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Additional Information
A student can view additional information at http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/accreditation.html.
To obtain a copy of University accreditation and licensure documents, or information on how to contact any of the agencies that regulate the University, contact the Apollo Legal Department at 602.557.1554.

Academic Programs, Facilities and
Instructional Personnel Information
Academic program offerings and instructional facilities vary according to geographic area and delivery mode at the local campus or online campus. Not all programs are available at all locations.

Academic Programs
University of Phoenix offers undergraduate and graduate programs in business and management, information systems and technology, security and criminal justice, nursing and health services administration, social sciences, humanities and sciences, and education. Detailed information regarding academic programs offered at specific instructional facilities is located at http://www.phoenix.edu/ programs/degree-programs.html and the appropriate Academic Catalog at http://www.phoenix.edu/ programs/degree-programs/academic-catalog.html. Admissions and program requirements vary by state. Please refer to the Academic Catalog for state and/or program-specific information.

Academic Program Improvement
University of Phoenix pursues a strategy of continuous improvement in relation to its academic programs. This strategy is implemented through assessment processes designed to measure student learning at various levels within the University. Multiple direct and indirect outcomes-based assessment and evaluation measures are utilized to create as comprehensive a picture as possible of the strengths and potential challenges to student learning. Resulting data is used to evaluate and improve academic programs and enhance the overall academic experience.
For University of Phoenix, the purpose of outcomes-based assessment of student learning is to generate information to the faculty, program, college and school, and University about the efficacy of its curricula and educational practices in enabling students to achieve exit-level expectations at the course, program and institutional levels. Assessment answers the question: How well are University of Phoenix students meeting the general education, programmatic and institutional learning outcomes underscored by the University’s mission? Its findings inform opportunities for curricular and pedagogical improvement, decision-making processes for policy consideration and resource allocation, and accountability. The process for outcomes-based assessment of student learning uses the following conceptual framework:





Assessment Planning
Collecting Evidence and Analyzing Data
Implementing Improvement
Monitoring Effectiveness of Improvements
By utilizing this assessment process, the colleges and schools establish clear, measurable outcomes and ensure that students have sufficient opportunities to achieve outcomes; systematically gather, analyze and interpret evidence to determine how well student learning matches stated expectations; use assessment findings to improve student learning; and monitor improvements by measuring changes in student learning over time.

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Articulation Agreements
A list of institutions that University of Phoenix has established articulation agreements with can be viewed at http://www.phoenix.edu/admissions/transfer_information/transfer-guides.html

Corporate Articulations
A list of corporations with which University of Phoenix has established articulation agreements can be viewed at http://www.phoenix.edu/admissions/transfer_information/transfer_credit/corporate_ articulation.html Credit Transfer
Information regarding criteria used to evaluate the transfer of credits earned at another institution is located at http://www.phoenix.edu/admissions/transfer_information/previous_college_education.html
The University Credit Transfer Policy can be viewed at http://www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_ options/policies/credit_transfer_policy.html Reverse Transfer Agreements
University of Phoenix has established reverse transfer agreements with partnering institutions.
With a reverse transfer agreement in place, University of Phoenix will notify the partner transfer institution and provide directory information for students meeting certain credit requirements that indicate the student may be eligible to earn an associate degree from the transfer institution.
The transfer institution may pursue communication with the student to discuss requirements and may award the associate degree to the student per its discretion.

Disability Services
University of Phoenix recognizes and accepts its obligations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of a disability and requiring the University to provide reasonable accommodations to otherwise qualified disabled students in all University programs and activities.
The University of Phoenix Disability Services Office provides services to students with appropriate documentation for temporary health issues or a permanent disability.
Students with a temporary or permanent disability seeking disability services from the University must: (1) disclose their disability to the Disability Services Office and (2) request accommodation through the Disability Services Office. Confirmation through documentation from a health care provider may be required prior to accommodations being determined and fulfilled.

Obtain Information
The disability services advisor is responsible for managing the accommodation process, including any negotiations regarding services, and finalizing appropriate student accommodations.
Additional information and a list of disability services advisors are located at http://www.phoenix. edu/students/disability-services.html Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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General Contact Information
Direct any questions regarding admissions, academics, financial options, facilities or general institutional issues to the following offices:
Central Administration
University of Phoenix
1625 W. Fountainhead Pkwy. Mail Stop: CF-SX03
Tempe, AZ 85282-2371
800.366.9699
Online Campus
University of Phoenix
3157 E. Elwood St. Mail Stop: CF-B105
Phoenix, AZ 85034
866.766.0766
Admissions and Records Service Center
4025 S. Riverpoint Pkwy. Mail Stop: CF-A208
Phoenix, AZ 85040
800.866.3919
480.446.4600
ARSC@phoenix.edu
Campus contact information is located at http://www.phoenix.edu/campus-locations.html

Faculty
University faculty members are accomplished managers, technology leaders, professional educators, corporate executives, financial officers, human services professionals and leaders in other professional areas who also possess advanced degrees. A list of faculty may be obtained from each local campus.
To find a local campus, go to http://www.phoenix.edu/campus-locations.html
Faculty profiles can be found at http://www.phoenix.edu/faculty/our_faculty.html

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Graduation Rates
In accordance with the Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965, as amended, each postsecondary educational institution must publish information regarding graduation rates as defined by the
National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). This graduation measure includes the cohort of full-time, first-time (FTFT) degree/certificate-seeking undergraduate students and tracks their completion status at 150% of the normal time to complete all requirements of their program of study.
A first-time student is defined as a student who has no prior postsecondary experience attending any institution for the first time at the undergraduate level.
Data are collected on the number of students entering the institution as FTFT degree- and/ or certificate-seeking undergraduate students in a particular cohort year. Graduation rates are disaggregated by race and ethnicity, gender and federal financial aid grant or loan funds. The graduation rates shown below represent students from the 2008–2009 cohort and the percentages of those students who graduated within 150% by Aug. 31, 2014.
The table below shows FTFT undergraduate students and is derived from the IPEDS graduation rate survey, although shown in aggregate rather than by degree/award type. The University is a nontraditional institution that caters to a wide variety of students, including many who have previously attended another institution of higher education, and would not be classified as first-time students. Data includes recipients of Pell Grants or subsidized loans, or neither type of aid during the
2008–2009 cohort years (September 1 – August 31).
FTFT Degree- or Certificate-seeking Undergraduate Students in the 2008–2009 Cohort
Enrolled FTFT
Undergraduates*

Enrolled FTFT Undergraduates
Graduated Within 150%
Timeframe Allowed

Graduation Percent
Enrolled FTFT
Undergraduates

Totals

121,517

20,838

17%

Male

34,940

4,963

14%

Female

86,577

15,875

18%

Nonresident Alien

1,527

404

26%

Hispanic/Latino

7,407

1,404

19%

American Indian or
Alaskan Native

1,201

190

16%

Asian

674

155

23%

Black or African American

24,867

3,150

13%

Native Hawaiian or Other
Pacific Islander

700

129

18%

White

41,864

10,308

25%

Race or Ethnicity Unknown

43,277

5,098

12%

Pell Grant Recipients

81,370

13,045

16%

Subsidized Stafford Loan
Recipients who did not receive a Pell Grant

18,485

4,436

24%

Students who received neither Pell Grants nor
Subsidized Stafford Loans

21,662

3,357

15%

* Excludes 497 students who became deceased after entering the cohort, but before they graduated.

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Retention Rates
In accordance with the Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965, as amended, each postsecondary educational institution must make available information regarding retention rates of degree- and/ or certificate-seeking first-time, full-time (FTFT) undergraduate students entering the institution.
Retention rate is a measure of the rate at which students persist in their educational program at an institution, expressed as a percentage. The table shown below is the percentage of FTFT undergraduate degree-seeking students from the previous fall who were still enrolled in the next fall.
Retention Rates for FTFT Undergraduate Students
Count of FTFT undergraduate students enrolled Fall 2013
(8/1/2013 to 10/31/2013)*

12,300

Count of FTFT undergraduate students enrolled Fall 2013
(8/1/2013 to 10/31/2013) still enrolled in Fall 2014 (8/1/2014 to 10/31/2014)

4,363

Retention

35.5%

*  xcludes students who became deceased after 10/31/13 and those who were enrolled in and completed a certificate program
E
shorter than 1 year in length who would not be expected to be retained in the following year.

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Student Diversity
In accordance with the Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965, as amended, each postsecondary educational institution must make available information regarding student diversity as defined by the IPEDS. Data reported are for enrolled full-time students.
Table 1 represents all enrolled students from July 1, 2013, through June 30, 2014. Of the total enrolled students, those who received Pell Grant funds during the July 1, 2013, through June 30, 2014, timeframe are shown in Table 2.
Table 1: All Enrolled Students by Gender and Race/Ethnicity
Total Enrolled

Percentage

Total Enrollment

418,790

100%

Male

142,479

34.0%

Female

276,311

66.0%

Nonresident Alien

7,630

1.8%

40,946

9.8%

American Indian or Alaska Native

2,197

0.5%

Asian

5,912

1.4%

Black/African American

81,620

19.5%

Native Hawaiian or
Other Pacific Islander

3,079

0.7%

Hispanic/Latino

White

129,775

31.0%

Two or more races

14,503

3.5%

Unknown

133,128

31.8%

Table 2: Pell Grant Recipients by Gender and Race/Ethnicity
Total Enrolled

Percentage

Pell Grant Recipients

187,270

100%

Male

50,905

27.2%

Female

136,365

72.8%

Nonresident Alien

2,330

1.3%

Hispanic/Latino

19,688

10.5%

937

0.5%

American Indian or Alaska Native
Asian

1,731

0.9%

42,394

22.6%

Native Hawaiian or
Other Pacific Islander

1,248

0.7%

White

59,395

31.7%

Black/African American

Two or more races
Unknown

9,189

4.9%

50,358

26.9%

Note: Information reported on student diversity for all enrolled students is from the IPEDS 12 Month Enrollment Survey (July
1, 2013, to June 30, 2014). Pell recipients were those students from the 12 Month Enrollment Survey who were disbursed Pell funds during the July 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014 timeframe.

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Types of Education in Which Graduates Enroll
In accordance with the Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965, as amended, each postsecondary educational institution must make available information regarding the types of graduate and professional education in which graduates of the institution’s four-year degree programs enrolled.
Approximately 14% of students who completed a bachelor ’s degree from University of Phoenix between July 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014, went on to enroll in a graduate or professional program at
University of Phoenix. The most common programs students enrolled in are as follows:






Master of Business Administration
Master of Science in Psychology/Behavioral Health
Master of Science in Psychology
Master of Science in Administration/Human Resource Management
Master of Health Administration
The data is derived from the IPEDS Completions Survey (July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014 data) and the
IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey (Aug. 1, 2014 to Oct. 31, 2014 data).

Alumni Attending Graduate School
Fifty-five percent of University of Phoenix alumni indicated they are attending, or plan to attend, graduate school. Of this 55%, 19% are currently pursuing a graduate degree at University of Phoenix.
Forty-three percent of University of Phoenix master program graduates indicated they planned to attend a doctoral-level program. Of this 43%, 4% are currently pursuing a doctoral degree at
University of Phoenix.
Sixty-five percent of University of Phoenix bachelor program graduates indicated they planned to attend a master-level program. Of this 65%, 15% are currently pursuing a master’s degree at
University of Phoenix.

Working Alumni
Based on responses from the Alumni Association’s 2012 survey, the following represents the types of industry in which our alumni work:
UOPX Alumni Employment by Industry*
Health Services

17%

Business Services

2%

Education

13%

Social Services

2%

Manufacturing

6%

Insurance

3%

Retail Trade (Non-Restaurant)

5%

Transportation

3%

Technology

5%

Finance/Financial Services

3%

State and Local Government

4%

Banking

3%

Federal Government

4%

Military

2%

* Question #40: In what industry do you work? Bases: Respondents who are employed — 25,214.

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Alumni Occupations
The following represents occupations of University of Phoenix alumni, based on a survey completed in 2012 between January 25 and March 2 by 31,506 respondents:
UOPX Alumni Occupation*
Engineer/Architect (including technology)

13%

Other Health Professional

4%

Finance/Accountant

10%

Protective Services (Police, Fire, Security)

3%

Teacher Educator/Education Administrator

9%

Admin Support, Records/Data Processor

2%

Sales/Marketing Representative

6%

Consultant

2%

Registered Nurse/Other Nursing Professional

5%

Human Resources

2%

Executive/Manager/Administrator

5%

Psychologist/Counselor/Social Worker

2%

Operations/Production

5%

Business Owner

2%

Technician/Technologist

4%

Other

5%

* Question #41: What is your occupation? Bases: Respondents who are employed — 25,214.

Title II of Higher Education Act —
Academic Year 2012–2013
In compliance with Title II of the Higher Education Act (HEA), University of Phoenix has submitted institutional questionnaires that detail the University’s program offerings, student demographics and student performance in those states where the University has teacher education programs that have produced program completers, also known as graduates. University of Phoenix provides professional preparation for teachers in multiple states. This is an overview of the information contained in the
Institutional Report for University of Phoenix.

Title II HEA Pass-Rate Information
Program completers achieved the following scores for academic year 2013–2014:
Arizona
Professional knowledge — Elementary: 95%
Professional knowledge — Secondary: 100%
Professional knowledge — Early Childhood: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Aggregate professional knowledge: 95%
Aggregate content areas: 96%
Special populations: 96%
California
California basic educational skills test (CBEST): 100%
Reading instruction competence assessment (RICA) — Elementary only: 75%
Aggregate content areas: 96%
Other academic content areas: 100%
Colorado
Aggregate academic content areas: 100%
Other academic content areas: 100%
Special populations: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Hawaii
Aggregate basic skills: 100%
Aggregate professional knowledge: 100%
Aggregate academic content areas: 100%

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Indiana
Aggregate basic skills: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Aggregate academic content areas: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Missouri
Aggregate professional knowledge: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Nevada
Aggregate basic skills: 100%
Aggregate academic content areas: 100%
Aggregate professional knowledge: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Aggregate teaching special education: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
New Mexico
Aggregate basic skills: 100%
Teacher competency — Elementary: 81%
Teacher competency — Secondary: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Aggregate teacher competency: 88%
Aggregate academic content areas: 100%
Oregon
Aggregate teacher competency: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Aggregate academic content areas: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Aggregate basic skills: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Texas
Aggregate professional knowledge: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided
Utah
Aggregate academic content areas: 100%
Aggregate teaching special populations: Less than 10 candidates, score not provided

Program Information for Academic Year 2013–2014
AZ

CO

CA

HI

IN

MO

NM

NV

OR

TX

UT

Number of students enrolled

9,104

189

1,381

122

136

91

204

274

22

56

155

Number of students in student teaching

1,328

117

138

20

4

24

56

46

14

11

27

Number of supervising faculty including part- and full-time

407

32

71

11

2

4

18

11

2

9

9

Student-to-faculty ratio for student teaching

4:1

4:1

2:1

2:1

2:1

6:1

3:1

4:1

7:1

2:1

3:1

Average hours per week in student teaching

40

40

40

40

40

40

40

40

40

40

40

Number of weeks of student teaching 12

15

15

13

12

12

14

13

15

12

12

Is the Teacher Education
Program currently approved by the state?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Is the Teacher Education
Program currently designated as low performing?

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Federal Financial Aid Application Process
To begin the federal financial aid process, students must complete the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA), available at http://www.fafsa.gov. This is the first step to determining a student’s eligibility for federal financial aid.
Federal financial aid will be processed after submitting an application for admission and registering for courses in an eligible degree program. Admissions and program requirements vary by state
Please refer to the Academic Catalog for state- and/or program-specific information at http://www.phoenix.edu/programs/degree-programs/academic-catalog.html During the federal financial aid application process, the following forms may be completed for federal financial aid grants and loans:






Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
University of Phoenix Loan Request form
Federal Direct Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN)
Entrance counseling
Financial Aid Authorization form if, and only if, a student chooses this option
The University highly recommends using the online financial aid application website. This website allows a student to complete and electronically sign financial aid documents, and directs them to complete the FAFSA and MPN.
Students interested in utilizing financial aid programs should complete all required application materials each academic year. A student should reapply for financial aid prior to the start of each new academic year.
The average processing time for financial aid awards is 90 days.

Statement of Educational Purpose
The parent or student signing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) certifies the following:
(1) use federal and/or state student financial aid only to pay the cost of attending an institution of higher education,* (2) is not in default on a federal student loan or has made satisfactory arrangements to repay it, (3) does not owe money back on a federal student grant or has made satisfactory arrangements to repay it, (4) will notify college if defaulting on a federal student loan, and (5) will not receive a Federal Pell Grant from more than one college for the same period of time.
The parent or student signing the FAFSA agrees, if asked, to provide information that will verify the accuracy of the completed form. This information may include federal or state income tax forms filed or that are required to file. In addition, the parent or student certifies and understands that the
Secretary of Education has the authority to verify information reported on this application with the
IRS and other federal agencies. If the parent or student signs any document related to the federal student aid programs electronically using a personal identification number (PIN), username and password, and/or other credential, that person certifies that he or she is the person identified by the
PIN, username and password, and/or other credential and has not disclosed that PIN, username and password, and/or other credential to anyone else. If the parent or student purposely gives false or misleading information, he or she may be fined up to $20,000, sent to prison or both.

*  ederal aid funding is available only for those credits required to complete the student’s primary program of study. Federal
F
aid funding will cease once the maximum number of credits for the primary program have been completed. Federal financial aid may not be available for additional coursework in the pursuit of a concentration or otherwise, if not included within the requirements of the primary program of study.

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Referrals to the Office of Inspector General
University of Phoenix is required by law to make referrals to the Office of Inspector General any time there is credible information or evidence that an applicant (student) may have engaged in fraud or other criminal misconduct in connection with the application involving federal financial aid programs.

Federal, State and Institutional Financial Aid Programs
Degree-seeking students who are U.S. citizens or eligible noncitizens enrolled in an eligible academic program can apply for federal financial aid as a means of assisting with financing their education.
Certificate programs may also be eligible for federal financial aid. Depending on the program, student eligibility may be need-based, non-need-based, credit-based or dependent on other specific conditions.
Students may also be eligible to receive funding through state grant or scholarship programs in their states where available. Students should contact a Finance Advisor at 866.766.0766 for additional information on the financial aid programs available at each campus. A list of campuses is available at http://www.phoenix.edu/campus-locations.html General Eligibility Requirements
General eligibility requirements for federal financial aid are as follows:
• Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen.
•  ave a valid Social Security number (with the exception of students from the Republic
H
of the Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau).
•  e registered with Selective Service, if you’re a male (you must register between the
B
ages of 18 and 25).
•  e enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student in an eligible degree or certificate program.*
B
• Be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for Direct Loan Program funds.
• Maintain satisfactory academic progress in college or career school.
• Sign statements on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) stating that
––  ou are not in default on a federal student loan and do not owe money on
Y
a federal student grant and
––  ou will use federal student aid only for educational purposes.
Y
•  how you are qualified to obtain a college or career school education by
S
having a high school diploma or
–– Final high school transcript that shows the date a diploma was awarded
–– Recognized equivalent such as a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or other state-sanctioned test of diploma-equivalency certificate
–– California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE) Certificate; High School
Equivalency Test (HiSET); Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC)
–– Completed homeschooling and was conferred a diploma by the state
For additional eligibility requirements, go to: http://studentaid.ed.gov/eligibility/basic-criteria

*  ederal aid funding is available only for those credits required to complete the student’s primary program of study. Federal
F
aid funding will cease once the maximum number of credits for the primary program have been completed. Federal financial aid may not be available for additional coursework in the pursuit of a concentration or otherwise, if not included within the requirements of the primary program of study.

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Student/Parent Eligibility Policy
Federal regulations require students meet specific eligibility criteria before being awarded federal financial aid.

Policy
The University ensures all students meet all eligibility requirements prior to awarding federal financial aid.

Enrollment
Prior to awarding federal financial aid, the University confirms the student is enrolled, or accepted for enrollment, as a regular student at the University. Students must be admitted and matriculated to a program of study eligible for federal financial aid. Students who are not admitted and matriculated will not be certified or disbursed federal financial aid. Any student enrolled in an elementary or secondary institution is not eligible to receive federal financial aid.
Students who are provisionally admitted, as described below, must also be matriculated.
Students in any graduate (non-doctoral) degree program who meet all admission requirements, except the minimum GPA requirement for their program, may be admitted on a provisional status if they earned a GPA between 2.0 and 2.49 on the undergraduate degree posted transcript, unless otherwise noted in academic policy.

High School Diploma or Equivalent
Students must be qualified to study at the postsecondary level. For students attending the University, one of the following criteria must be met and appropriate documentation provided:
• High school diploma
–– A copy of the student’s high school diploma
• Recognized equivalent of a high school diploma
–– General Education Development (GED) certificate
–– California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE)
–– HiSET Completion Certificate
–– Documentation provided by the state or appropriate Department of Education in the student’s state or jurisdiction indicating that the student has earned a secondary completion credential that has the same rights, privileges and rigor of a normal high school diploma
–– An academic transcript indicating the student successfully completed at least a two-year program that is acceptable for full credit toward a bachelor’s degree
–– A homeschool diploma that is conferred by the state in which it was completed or by an entity that is accredited by an approved body

Loan Limits
A student is ineligible for federal financial aid if annual or aggregate loan limits made under any federal financial aid HEA loan program have been exceeded or has property subject to a judgment lien for a debt owed to the United States.

Drug Convictions
Students become ineligible for Title IV federal financial aid if convicted of possession or sale of drugs for any offense that occurred during any period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal financial aid funds. Any conviction that was reversed, set aside or removed from the student’s record does not count; nor does a conviction received when the student was a juvenile, unless the student was tried as an adult. If the student was convicted of both selling and possessing illegal drugs

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and the periods of ineligibility are different, the student will be ineligible for the longer period.

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The University will make available to all students, through consumer information, details regarding the penalties for these types of drug violations.
Other departments will send notification to Student Financial Services — Operations (SFS-O) once aware a student has been convicted of any offense involving the possession or sale of illegal drugs, to cancel future federal financial aid disbursements. SFS-O will notify the student of lost eligibility due to a drug violation and provide information regarding the specific penalties, along with information on how to regain eligibility for federal financial aid.

Incarcerated Students
University of Phoenix must ensure that no more than 25% of its regular students are incarcerated.
This percentage will be monitored for the latest completed award year.
An incarcerated student is someone serving a criminal sentence in a federal, state or local penitentiary, prison, jail, reformatory, work farm or other similar correctional institution. A student in a less formal arrangement, such as a halfway house, home detention or sentenced to serve only weekends, is not considered to be incarcerated.

Title IV Eligibility for Incarcerated Students
All incarcerated students are:
• Not eligible for Title IV federal financial aid loans
• Eligible for FSEOG
Students incarcerated in federal or state penal institutions are not eligible for Pell Grants.
Students incarcerated by jurisdictions defined as a state in the law, such as the District of Columbia, are considered to be in a state penal institution and are not eligible for Pell Grants.
Students incarcerated in local penal institutions (local or county jails, penitentiaries, correctional facilities and juvenile justice facilities) are eligible for Pell Grants.
Students who are subject to an involuntary civil commitment following incarceration for a sexual offense are not eligible to receive Pell Grants.

Cost of Attendance for Incarcerated Students
Cost of attendance includes an allowance for tuition, course materials fees, books and supplies, if required in the program of study. No other expenses are included. Allowable costs are assessed at the rate designated in the University’s Student Financial Aid budgets.

Regaining Title IV Eligibility for Incarcerated Students
The University may accept a written self-certification indicating the student is no longer incarcerated. The student becomes eligible for federal financial aid funds as of the date his or her incarceration has ended.

Citizenship
All students must be a U.S. citizen or national or U.S. permanent resident or other eligible noncitizen to receive federal financial aid.
A citizen of the Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of the Marshall Islands, or the Republic of
Palau is eligible to receive federal financial aid under the Federal Pell Grant but is not eligible for Direct
Loans. Citizens of Palau are also eligible for FSEOG.

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Secondary Confirmation
If a student indicates an eligible noncitizen on the FAFSA and provides an A-Number, identifying information will be automatically sent to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for primary and, if necessary, secondary confirmation. If the University receives an SAR/ISIR with a secondary confirmation match flag of P, the DHS will continue to check its records in a process called automated secondary confirmation. The University will wait at least five, but no more than 15, business days for the result of automated secondary confirmation. If the result is not received by that time, the
University will begin the paper process of secondary confirmation.
The University has 10 business days after receipt of the documents for immigration status to undergo paper secondary confirmation. The University will notify the student of the final decision based on the secondary confirmation results.

Default
Any student applying for federal financial aid must not be in default on a loan made under any federal financial aid program or HEA loan program.

Overpayments
A student must not currently owe an overpayment of federal grant funds or Federal Perkins Loan to be eligible for federal financial aid.

Selective Service
The University requires men who are age 18 through 25 to register with the Selective Service System.
Students who are exempt or waived from this requirement are asked to provide the University with supporting documentation for review. The review process is documented along with the supporting documentation provided. If, after the review, the student is not clearly exempt or waived from the requirement to register, the University will ask the student to provide a Status Information Letter from the Selective Service.

Unusual Enrollment History (UEH)
The University resolves an Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR) that reports a UEH flag prior to awarding a student Title IV funds. The UEH flags are:
• N — No resolution is required by the university; the student’s enrollment pattern is not unusual.
• 2 — The University reviews the student’s enrollment and financial aid records to determine if, during the three-award-year review period (award years 2011/2012, 2012/2013 and 2013/2014), the student received a Pell Grant at the University.
• 3 — The University reviews the student’s academic records to determine if the student received academic credit at the University during the three-award-year period (award years 2011/2012, 2012/2013,
2013/2014). In addition, the University reviews the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) to identity all schools where the student received Pell Grant funding over the past three award years.
The University will determine, for each of the previously attended schools, whether academic credit was earned during the award year the student received Pell Grant funds. This determination is based upon academic transcripts already obtained by the University or by asking the student to provide academic transcripts or grade reports.
Students who do not show earned credit for the Pell Grant awards received in the past three years, and who may have special circumstances, may submit a request through the Professional Judgment
(PJ) Team for approval.
Students who do not meet any of the above criteria are immediately not eligible for federal aid.

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Approval of Continued Eligibility for UEH
If the student’s continued eligibility for federal financial aid funds is approved, and in order for the student to remain eligible for federal financial aid funds, the student must successfully complete one payment period at the University.

Denial of Continued Eligibility for UEH
If the student did not earn academic credit at one or more of the relevant schools and does not provide acceptable documentation, the University will deny the student any additional federal financial aid funds.

Regaining Eligibility for UEH
The student is required to successfully complete one payment period at the University to regain federal financial aid eligibility. During this time, the student is required to use an alternate method of payment for tuition and fees. Upon regaining eligibility, loans may be awarded retroactively back to the beginning of the AY, but Pell Grants are only awarded going forward/starting with the next payment period.

Parental Nonsupport
Although students whose parents refuse support are not eligible for a dependency override, the
University has the authority to offer a dependent student a Direct Unsubsidized Loan without requiring the parent(s) to file a FAFSA provided supporting documentation is obtained. Supporting documentation consists of a completed parental nonsupport confirmation form or a signed and dated verification statement from the parent(s) specifying the following:
• The parent(s) do not provide any financial support and the date the financial support ended,
• The parent(s) will not provide any financial support in the future; and
• The parent(s) refuse to complete the parental section of the FAFSA.
The University may accept documentation from a third party (e.g., teacher, counselor, clergy, court, etc.) describing the student’s relationship with the parent(s) if the parent(s) will not provide the required verification statement.
Students who are offered the Direct Unsubsidized Loan without parental data on the FAFSA are only eligible to receive the loan limit based on dependent undergraduate student annual maximums.
For example, a first-year undergraduate student cannot receive more than $5,500 ($3,500 base plus $2,000). The parent(s) cannot later apply for a PLUS Loan, unless the parents are separated or divorced, in which case the noncustodial parent can apply for a PLUS Loan. If the noncustodial parent is subsequently denied the PLUS Loan, the student’s Direct Unsubsidized Loan eligibility is not increased. The student will not be eligible for any other Title IV financial aid programs.

Dependency Overrides
A student who does not meet the definition of independent may be designated as independent if the
University makes a documented determination of independence due to special circumstances. The
U.S. Department of Education interprets a special circumstance as one that makes it inappropriate to expect a parental contribution. Examples of special circumstances include inability to locate parents, an abusive family environment or abandonment by parents. Generally, the documentation of special circumstances will come from a third party who knows the student’s situation (such as a teacher or member of the clergy), but in cases where this is not available, the University will accept a signed statement from the student detailing the special circumstance.
Professional judgment is not used to change the status of a student from independent to dependent.
However, the University may use professional judgment to account for parental support where special circumstances warrant.

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Dependency overrides do not carry over from one year to the next. If the student is not independent for some other reason noted on the FAFSA, the University will reaffirm each year that the special circumstance persists and an override is still justified.

PLUS Exceptional Factor
Dependent students whose parents are unable to borrow PLUS Loans due to adverse credit or other exceptional circumstances may receive additional Direct Unsubsidized Loans for the same amount as independent undergraduate students. The PLUS exceptional factor is not a dependency override, as parent information is provided on the FAFSA. Examples include:
• The parent is incarcerated.
• The parent’s whereabouts are unknown.
• The parent has filed for bankruptcy and has provided a letter from the bankruptcy court stating that as a condition of the bankruptcy filing, the parent may not incur any additional debt.
• The parent’s income is limited to public assistance or disability benefits, and it has been documented that the parent would not be able to repay the PLUS Loan.
• The parent of a dependent student is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, or is unable to provide evidence from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) that he or she is in the United States for other than a temporary purpose with the intention of becoming a citizen or permanent resident.
Supporting documentation may include, but is not limited to, documentation that corroborates the exceptional circumstances. The University will re-examine and document that exceptional circumstances continue to apply before certifying/originating additional unsubsidized loan amounts for the dependent in a subsequent award year.

Eligibility for Direct and PLUS Loans
A student is eligible to receive a Direct Subsidized Loan, a Direct Unsubsidized Loan or a combination of these loans if the student meets the following requirements:
• The student is enrolled, or accepted for enrollment, on at least a half-time basis in a school that participates in the Direct Loan Program.
• The student meets the requirements for an eligible student.
• In the case of an undergraduate student who seeks a Direct Subsidized Loan or a Direct Unsubsidized
Loan at a school that participates in the Federal Pell Grant Program, the student has received a determination of Federal Pell Grant eligibility for the period of enrollment the loan is sought.
The annual loan limit for graduate and professional students is $20,500. This amount is limited to
Direct Unsubsidized Loans only.
In the case of a borrower whose previous loan or TEACH Grant service obligation was cancelled due to total and permanent disability, or discharged after a final determination of total and permanent disability, the borrower:
• Must obtain certification from a physician that the borrower is able to engage in substantial gainful activity;
• Must sign a statement acknowledging the Direct Loan the borrower receives cannot be discharged in the future on the basis of any impairment present when the new loan is made, unless that impairment substantially deteriorates; and
• If the borrower receives a new Direct Loan, other than a Direct Consolidation Loan, within three years of the date that any previous Title IV loan or TEACH Grant service obligation was discharged due to a total and permanent disability, the student must resume payment on the old loan before receipt of the new loan or TEACH Grant.

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In the case of a borrower whose prior loan under Title IV federal financial aid was conditionally discharged after an initial determination that the borrower was totally and permanently disabled based on a discharge request received prior to July 1, 2010:
• The suspension of collection activity on the prior loan has been lifted;
• The borrower complies with all requirements;
• The borrower signs a statement acknowledging the loan that has been conditionally discharged prior to a final determination of total and permanent disability cannot be discharged in the future on the basis of any impairment present when the borrower applied for a total and permanent disability discharge or when the new loan is made, unless that impairment substantially deteriorates; and
• The borrower signs a statement acknowledging that the suspension of collection activity on the prior loan will be lifted.
A graduate/professional student or parent is eligible to receive a Direct PLUS Loan if the following requirements are met:
• Student completes a current award year Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
• The parent borrower is the student’s biological or adoptive mother or father or the student’s stepparent if his or her income and assets are taken into account when calculating the student’s EFC.
• The parent borrower is borrowing to pay for educational costs of a dependent undergraduate student who meets the requirements for an eligible student.
• The parent borrower provides a Social Security number for his- or herself and the student.
• Student or parent borrower meets the requirements pertaining to citizenship and residency.
• Student or parent borrower meets the requirements concerning defaults and overpayments.
• Student or parent borrower is not incarcerated.
• The federal government does not have a judgment lien on the parent’s property.
• Complies with the requirements for submission of a Statement of Educational Purpose for the student, except for the completion of a Statement of Selective Service Registration Status.
• Student or parent borrower does not have an adverse credit history.
• Student or parent borrower has an adverse credit history but has obtained an endorser who does not have an adverse credit history; or has an adverse credit history but documents to the satisfaction of the Secretary that extenuating circumstances exist. (Note: Effective March 29, 2015: PLUS Loan counseling must be completed by the applicant [parent or graduate/professional student] with an adverse credit history who qualifies for a Direct PLUS Loan by obtaining an endorser who does not have an adverse credit history, or who documents to the satisfaction of the Department of Education that there are extenuating circumstances related to the adverse credit information.)

Grant Programs
Federal Grant Programs
University of Phoenix participates in the following federal grant programs:

Federal Pell Grant
A Federal Pell Grant, unlike a loan, does not have to be repaid. Pell Grants may be awarded to undergraduate students who have not earned a bachelor’s or a professional degree. The amount of aid students can receive varies depending on their financial need, cost of attendance and other eligibility criteria.
Students can receive the Federal Pell Grant for no more than 12 semesters or the equivalent: http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/grants-scholarships/pell/calculate-eligibility For more detailed information on eligibility and how to apply for the Federal Pell Grant, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/grants-scholarships/pell Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
The FSEOG program is for undergraduate students with exceptional financial need. Pell Grant recipients with the lowest expected family contributions (EFCs) will be considered first for an FSEOG.
The FSEOG does not have to be repaid.
For more detailed information on eligibility and how to apply for the FSEOG, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/grants-scholarships/FSEOG Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant (IASG)
A student whose parent or guardian was a member of the U.S. Armed Forces and died as a result of service performed in Iraq or Afghanistan after Sept. 11, 2001, may be eligible to receive the Iraq and
Afghanistan Service Grant.
For more detailed information on eligibility and how to apply for the IASG, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/grants-scholarships/iraq-afghanistan-service Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education
(TEACH) Grant Program
The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant Program provides grants of up to $4,000 per award year to students who are completing or plan to complete coursework required to start a career in teaching. Students receiving the grant must sign the agreement to serve and agree to teach:
• In a high-need field
• At an elementary school, secondary school or educational service agency that serves low income students
• At least four complete academic years within eight years after completing the course of study the grant was received for
All students in a TEACH-eligible program at the University will be sent a notification letter of their potential eligibility and instructions on how to apply for the TEACH Grant. Students must have a cumulative GPA of a least 3.25, sign an Agreement to Serve (ATS) at https://teach-ats.ed.gov/ats/index. action, and complete all required counseling each year they wish to be considered for a TEACH Grant.
For more detailed information on eligibility and how to apply for the TEACH Grant, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/grants-scholarships/teach TEACH Grant-Eligible Programs

The University has latitude to designate TEACH-eligible programs provided it meets criteria set forth by the U.S. Department of Education. TEACH-eligible programs are as follows:
MAED/SPE
MAED/TED-S
MAED/TEDHS (Oregon)
MAED/TEDMM (Texas)
MAED/TEDMS (Texas)
MAED/TEDMG (Texas)
MAED/TEDSS (Texas)
MAED/TEDSM (Texas)

Master of Arts in Education/Special Education
Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education
Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Education — High School/ Middle Level
Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education Middle Level Mathematics
Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education Middle Level Science
Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education Middle Level Generalist
Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education Secondary Level Science
Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education Secondary Level Mathematics

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State Grant Programs
Students may also be eligible to receive funding through state grant or scholarship programs where available. Depending on the program, student eligibility may be need-based, non-need-based, creditbased or dependent on other specific conditions. Contact a Finance Advisor at 866.766.0766 for additional information on state grant and/or scholarship programs. A list of campuses is available at http://www.phoenix.edu/campus-locations.html The actual amount of state grants awarded to any student is contingent on the availability of funds.
The University cannot guarantee any funding from the state grant sources listed, as the list is subject to change without notice based upon changes in state budgetary constraints, state law or regulation, and/or University participation. Where work or other requirements are included in order to preclude the conversion of a scholarship or grant to a loan, the University makes no representation or warranty as to whether a graduate will be able to obtain such employment or fulfill such other requirements.
For information regarding the grants offered by states — how to apply, eligibility, deadlines, etc. — see the list of programs and their respective websites and phone numbers below. For additional specific eligibility information, the institution may contact you directly when determining grant eligibility. Please note that states sometimes change eligibility requirements for existing grant programs or even eliminate programs for a period of time. The list below is deemed complete, but please confirm with your state.
ETV (Education Training Voucher) Program for Alabama, Arizona, Colorado,
Maryland, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Washington D.C.

http://www.fc2sprograms.org/
Arizona

Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE)
602.258.2435
https://highered.az.gov
Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) Grant https://azgrants.az.gov/arizona-leveraging-educational-assistance-partnership-azleap College Access Challenge Last Stretch (CAC Last Stretch) Scholarship https://azgrants.az.gov/college-access-challenge-last-stretch-scholarship Math, Science, Special Education (MSSE) Teacher Forgiveness Loan Program https://azgrants.az.gov/math-science-and-special-education-teacher-loan-forgiveness-program Private Postsecondary Education Student Financial Assistance Grant Program (PFAP) https://azgrants.az.gov/arizona-private-postsecondary-education-student-financial-assistance-program Postsecondary Education Grant (PEG) Program https://azgrants.az.gov/postsecondary-education-grant Special Postsecondary Education Grant (Special PEG) https://azgrants.az.gov/special-postsecondary-education-grant California

Chafee Grant
888.224.7268
https://www.chafee.csac.ca.gov/

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Florida

Office of Student Financial Assistance (OSFA)
888.827.2004
http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/
Florida Student Assistance Grant Program http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/home/uamain.htm Bright Futures Scholarship Program
Florida Medallion Scholars (FMS) Award
Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars (GSV) Award http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/bf Scholarship for Children or Spouses of Deceased or Disabled Veterans and Service Members http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/factsheets/CDDV.pdf José Martí Scholarship Challenge Grant Fund http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/factsheets/JoseMarti.pdf Hawaii

Kamehameha Schools Financial Aid and Scholarship Services (FASS)
800.344.8328
http://www.ksbe.edu/finaid/
Na Ho Okama A Pauahi
Imi Na Auao http://www.ksbe.edu/finaid/ Indiana

Education and Training Voucher (ETV) Program
855.577.2388
http://www.indianaetv.org/
Louisiana

Chafee Educational and Training Voucher (ETV) Program
800.259.5626
http://www.osfa.state.la.us/Chafee.htm
Maine

http://maine.gov/portal/education/
Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs
866.291.0004
http://www.gearupme.org
Michigan

Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs
888.447.2687
http://www.michigan.gov/mistudentaid/0,4636,7-128-60969_61016---,00.html

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Minnesota

Minnesota Office of Higher Education (MOHE)
651.642.0567
http://www.ohe.state.mn.us/
Minnesota State Grant http://www.ohe.state.mn.us/mPg.cfm?pageID=138 Child Care Grant http://www.ohe.state.mn.us/mPg.cfm?pageID=140 Minnesota GI Bill Program http://www.ohe.state.mn.us/mPg.cfm?pageID=1803 Minnesota Indian Scholarship Program http://www.ohe.state.mn.us/mPg.cfm?pageID=149 Missouri

Education and Training Voucher (ETV) Program
800.585.7115
http://www.fc2sprograms.org/missouri/
New York

Education and Training Voucher (ETV) Program
877.766.5025
http://www.fc2sprograms.org/new-york/
North Carolina

College Foundation of North Carolina (CFNC) http://www.cfnc.org/about/info_about.jsp Education and Training Voucher (ETV) Program
800.585.6118
http://www.fc2sprograms.org/north-carolina/
National Guard Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
866.866.2362
http://www.cfnc.org/Gateway?command=GetProgramDetail&type=3&id=56

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Ohio

Ohio Higher ED http://www.ohiohighered.org/ Ohio College Opportunity Grant Program
Tamika Braswell
614.728.8862
https://www.ohiohighered.org/ocog
Nurse Education Assistance Loan Program
Melissa Marshall
614.466.3561
https://www.ohiohighered.org/nealp
Ohio War Orphans Scholarship
Amber Brady
614.752.9528
https://www.ohiohighered.org/ohio-war-orphans
Ohio Education Training Voucher (ETV) Program
855.471.1931
http://www.fc2sprograms.org/ohio/
Ohio National Guard Scholarship Program
Afrika Alsup
614.336.7143 | 888.400.6484 http://ong.ohio.gov/information/education/scholarship_index.html Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s Promise
405.225.9239 | 800.858.1840 http://www.okhighered.org/okpromise/ Oregon

Office of Student Access and Completion (OSAC)
541.687.7400 | 800.452.8807 http://www.oregonstudentaid.gov/about-osac.aspx Chafee Education and Training Grant http://www.oregonstudentaid.gov/chafeeetv.aspx Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA)
800.233.0557
http://www.pheaa.org/index.html
Pennsylvania State Grant Program
800.692.7392
http://www.pheaa.org/funding-opportunities/state-grant-program/index.shtml
Chafee Education and Training Grant Program
800.692.7392
http://www.pheaa.org/funding-opportunities/other-educational-aid/chafee-program.shtml
Pennsylvania National Guard Educational Assistance Program (EAP)
800.692.7392
http://www.pheaa.org/funding-opportunities/aid-for-military-national-guard/national-guard-eap.shtml

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Rhode Island

Rhode Island Higher Education Assistance Authority (RIHEAA)
401.736.1100
http://www.riheaa.org/
Rhode Island State Grant Program
401.736.1170
http://www.riheaa.org/sng/
Tennessee

Tennessee National Guard Scholarship Program
615.833.9100 | 888.642.8448 http://www.state.tn.us/veteran/state_benifits/nat_guard_scholar.html Vermont

Vermont Student Assistance Corp (VSAC)
888.307.8722 | Burlington area 654.3765 http://services.vsac.org/wps/wcm/connect/vsac/VSAC Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)
Vermont Incentive Grant Program http://services.vsac.org/wps/wcm/connect/vsac/VSAC/Pay+for+College/Funding+Sources/Grants/ Institutional Grant Programs
University of Phoenix is committed to providing financial assistance opportunities through institutional grant programs for potential and current students. Various institutional grants are offered throughout the year. For a complete list of current institutional grant offerings, please visit http://www.phoenix.edu/institutionalgrants Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Scholarships
The Center for Scholarship Excellence (CSE) is a department of University of Phoenix. The CSE is committed to assisting with financial support through institutional and external scholarship programs.
The CSE encourages students to borrow responsibly as they work toward their educational goals.
University of Phoenix has a comprehensive scholarship website at http://www.phoenix.edu/tuition_ and_financial_options/scholarships.html to meet the needs of students. This website features scholarships offered by University of Phoenix, scholarship resources, tips, suggestions, articles, an external scholarship search engine and much more.

Institutional Scholarships
University of Phoenix offers a number of institutional scholarships, which are listed at http://www. phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/scholarships/institutional-scholarships.html. The
University often partners with organizations to promote scholarship programs. These scholarships are available to potential students or alumni. The CSE website, http://www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_ financial_options/scholarships/institutional-scholarships.html, is updated regularly for institutional scholarships, qualifications, and selection criteria specific to University of Phoenix current and potential students as opportunities become available.

External Scholarships
Private outside entities develop and fund external scholarships, some of which are listed at http:// www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/scholarships/external-scholarships.html. External scholarships are available to the general public, which may include University of Phoenix students.
Your eligibility for external scholarships depends on qualifying requirements that vary from scholarship to scholarship. The Center for Scholarship Excellence (CSE) evaluates external scholarship programs, determines applicability to the University student populations, and communicates these opportunities to students and campuses. The website is updated regularly as opportunities become available.

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Loans
Federal Direct Loan (DL) Program
Direct Loans, from the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program, are low-interest loans for eligible students to help cover the cost of higher education. Eligible students borrow directly from the U.S.
Department of Education at participating schools.
Direct Subsidized Loans — Direct Subsidized Loans are for students with financial need. The University will review the results of the FAFSA and determine the amount a student can borrow. The student is not charged interest while enrolled in school at least half-time.
Federal regulations limit a first-time borrower’s eligibility for Direct Subsidized Loans to a period not to exceed 150% of the length of the borrower’s educational program. Under certain conditions, the provision also causes first-time borrowers who have exceeded the 150% limit to lose the interest subsidy on their Direct Subsidized Loans. For more detailed information on Direct Subsidized Loan Time
Limitation, visit https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/directSubsidizedLoanTimeLimitation.action.
Note: Only first-time borrowers on or after July 1, 2013, are subject to the new provision. Generally, a first-time borrower is one who did not have an outstanding balance of principal or interest on a Direct
Loan or on an FFEL Program Loan on July 1, 2013.
Direct Unsubsidized Loans — Direct Unsubsidized Loans are available to students with and without financial need. Like subsidized loans, the University will review the results of the FAFSA to determine the amount a student can borrow. Interest accrues (accumulates) on an unsubsidized loan from the date the loan is initially disbursed. The student can pay the interest while in school and during grace periods and deferment or forbearance periods, or can allow it to accrue and be capitalized (that is, added to the principal amount of the loan). If a student chooses not to pay the interest as it accrues, this will increase the total amount to be repaid because the student will be charged interest on a higher principal amount.
Terms and Conditions — Students who receive a Direct Loan are subject to the terms and conditions disclosed on the Federal Direct Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN), http://www.direct.ed.gov/mpn. html, and the Direct Loan Disclosure Statement, http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/DirectLoan/ pubs/dlplain.pdf Borrower’s Rights and Responsibilities — Students receiving federal financial aid have varying rights and responsibilities in accordance with the Borrower’s Rights and Responsibilities Statement, http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/DirectLoan/pubs/dlrights.pdf, attached to the Master Promissory
Note (MPN).
For more detailed information on eligibility and how to apply for the Federal Direct Loan Program, visit https://www.studentaid.ed.gov/types/loans/subsidized-unsubsidized

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Federal Direct PLUS Loan for Parent(s)
Parents of dependent students may apply for a Direct PLUS Loan to help pay their child’s education expenses as long as certain eligibility requirements are met. Direct PLUS Loan eligibility is dependent upon the applicant’s credit history. If it is determined that the applicant has adverse credit history, the applicant will have the option to appeal the credit decision or pursue an endorser. If a parent is unable to secure a Direct PLUS Loan, the dependent student may be eligible for additional unsubsidized loans.
Terms and Conditions — Students whose parent(s) receive a PLUS Loan are subject to the terms and conditions disclosed on the Federal Direct PLUS Loan Application and Master Promissory Note (MPN) at http://www.direct.ed.gov/mpn.html
Borrower’s Rights and Responsibilities — Parents receiving federal financial aid have varying rights and responsibilities in accordance with the Borrower’s Rights and Responsibilities Statement, http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/DirectLoan/pubs/plusrights.pdf, attached to the Master
Promissory Note (MPN).
For more detailed information on eligibility and how to apply for Direct Parent PLUS Loans, visit http://www.studentaid.ed.gov/types/loans/plus Federal Direct PLUS Loan for Graduate and
Professional Degree Students
Graduate and professional degree students can borrow a Direct PLUS Loan to help cover education expenses at a fixed interest rate. Direct PLUS Loan eligibility is dependent upon the applicant’s credit history. If it is determined that the applicant has adverse credit history, the applicant will have the option to appeal the credit decision or to obtain an endorser.
Award Amount — Students are eligible to receive a Graduate PLUS Loan award up to their academic year cost of attendance (COA) minus any other financial assistance received.
Terms and Conditions — Students who receive a PLUS Loan for Graduate and Professional programs are subject to the terms and conditions disclosed on the Federal Direct PLUS Loan Application and
Master Promissory Note (MPN) at http://www.direct.ed.gov/mpn.html
Borrower’s Rights and Responsibilities — Students receiving federal financial aid have varying rights and responsibilities in accordance with the Borrower’s Rights and Responsibilities Statement, http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/DirectLoan/pubs/plusrights.pdf, attached to the Master
Promissory Note (MPN) for Direct PLUS Loans.
For more detailed information on eligibility and how to apply for the Direct PLUS Loan for Graduate and Professional students, visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/loans/plus
For information regarding Federal Student Loan Interest Rates, including Direct PLUS Loans, please visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/loans/interest-rates

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Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized
Annual Loan Limits
Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Annual and Aggregate Loan Limits are as follows:
Grade Level

Dependent
Undergraduate Student

Independent
Undergraduate Student

$5,500

3 & 4 (Junior & Senior)

$10,500

No more than $4,500 of this amount can be a subsidized loan. No more than $4,500 of this amount can be a subsidized loan. $7,500

2 (Sophomore)

No more than $3,500 of this amount can be a subsidized loan. $6,500

1 (Freshman)

$9,500

No more than $3,500 of this amount can be a subsidized loan. $12,500

No more than $5,500 of this amount can be a subsidized loan. No more than $5,500 of this amount can be a subsidized loan. $31,000

$57,500

No more than $23,000 of this amount may be in subsidized loans.

No more than $23,000 of this amount may be in subsidized loans.

Graduate/Professional Student

$20,500
Unsubsidized Loan only.*
The aggregate amounts for graduate students include loans for undergraduate study.

$138,500
Maximum total loan debt
(aggregate loan limits)

No more than $65,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans.
The aggregate amounts for graduate students include loans for undergraduate study.

Undergraduate certificate programs — Loan limits are based on the length of the program. For certificates that are less than an academic year, the $9,500 loan limits would be prorated by the lesser fraction of the weeks or credits in the program, divided by the University academic year definition of weeks or credits. Students in undergraduate certificate programs that are greater than an academic year cannot borrow more than the Grade Level 1 loan limits for each academic year. For final academic years less than 24 credits (graduating students in undergraduate degree or certificate programs that are greater than an academic year), loan limits will be prorated based on the number of credits in the final academic year divided by 24. Please note students may also receive less funding if they receive other financial aid used to cover a portion of cost of attendance.
*  raduate and professional students are not eligible to receive Direct Subsidized Loans for loan periods beginning on or after
G
July 1, 2012.

A student whose parent cannot obtain a PLUS Loan is allowed to borrow additional unsubsidized federal Direct amounts. Student dependency status will be determined based on answers to questions on the FAFSA.

Federal Education Loan Interest Rates and Origination Fees
For information regarding Federal Student Loan Interest Rates and Origination Fees, please visit http://studentaid.ed.gov/types/loans/interest-rates Interest Rate Cap for Military Members
During military service, students who qualify under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act may be eligible for 6% interest rate cap on the loans obtained before entering military service. Qualifying students must contact their loan servicer to request this benefit.
In addition, no interest is charged (for a period of no more than 60 months) on Direct Loans first disbursed on or after Oct. 1, 2008, while a borrower is serving on active duty or performing qualifying
National Guard duty during a war, other military operation or national emergency, and serving in an area of hostilities qualifying for special pay. Qualifying students should contact their loan servicer for eligibility details and to request this benefit.

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Prior Federal Loans and Financial Aid History
Federal financial aid borrowers can check the interest rate, servicer information and other financial aid history via the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) at http://www.nslds.ed.gov/

Private Student Loans
Understand your rights and responsibilities when considering private loan options. Clear and accurate information can help you make informed choices, so you borrow only what you need and can reasonably repay.
The University encourages that private loans be considered only after all federal and state financial aid options are exhausted. Private loans are made through third-party lenders and other financial institutions and are subject to a credit review and individual lender terms and conditions. These loans are not subsidized or guaranteed by the federal government. For more information on the difference between federal and private loans, please visit http://www.consumerfinance.gov/paying-for-college/ choose-a-student-loan/ Private student loans may be available to both students and parents who are not eligible for federal financial aid or who need assistance beyond their financial aid eligibility. The lender determines eligibility, and amounts are limited to the cost of attendance minus other aid, including discounts and any other resources received.
Students may choose to use any eligible lender that offers private loans. The University does not maintain a list of lenders that offer private loans, nor will it endorse a particular lender. Students who need a focused resource to assist in finding a private loan may choose to use the list of private loan options developed by FinAid at http://www.finaid.org/loans/privatestudentloans.phtml

Financial Aid Awarding
For students who have completed all required financial aid materials, the University will evaluate student eligibility for federal, state and institutional aid programs.
If a student is eligible, Student Financial Services — Operations calculates an estimated financial aid award and provides notification to the student. The notification includes eligibility information for each financial aid program awarded, as well as the amount and anticipated disbursement dates. This notification may be electronic. Generally, financial aid awards are divided into two payment periods.
Payment periods are based on individual course schedules and follow academic year requirements.
Federal Pell Grant eligibility for an undergraduate student is estimated before originating a Direct
Subsidized or Unsubsidized Loan. In addition, a Direct Unsubsidized Loan is not originated without first determining the eligibility for a Direct Subsidized Loan. However, if the amount of the Direct
Subsidized Loan is $200 or less and the amount can be included as part of a Direct Unsubsidized
Loan, the University is not required to originate a separate Subsidized Loan.
For a dependent student, the University may originate and disburse Parent PLUS funds without determining Federal Pell Grant and Direct Subsidized Loan eligibility. For a graduate student, the
University must determine graduate/professional maximum Direct Unsubsidized Loan eligibility before originating a Graduate/Professional PLUS Loan.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) eligibility for undergraduate students is determined by the expected family contribution (EFC) for the current award year. Awards are made beginning with the lowest EFC until program funds are obligated.
State grant program eligibility is determined by each state authority. The University is notified of student eligibility by the state authority.

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Institutional grant and scholarship eligibility determination will vary.

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Schedule Requirements
The University defines its academic year as follows:





Associate programs are a minimum of 24 credits and 36 weeks of instructional time.
Bachelor’s programs are a minimum of 24 credits and 40 weeks of instructional time.
Master’s programs are a minimum of 24 credits and 48 weeks of instructional time.
Doctoral programs are a minimum of 24 credits and 48 weeks of instructional time.
Note: The academic year definition may vary based on program level, version and course length.
The academic year begins with the first eligible course of a degree program and ends when a student successfully completes both the credits and weeks of instructional time requirements. An academic year has no calendar time constraints and continues through periods of nonattendance that are less than 180 days until both the credit and weeks requirements are met. A week of instructional time is a week (a consecutive seven-day period) in which one day of instruction occurs. Instructional time does not include periods of vacation, orientation or homework. An academic year that begins before a previous existing academic year has ended is considered an overlapping academic year.
Students who overlap courses or take courses concurrently may be required to complete additional credits to meet the number of weeks of instructional time required to complete the academic year.
The academic policy of the University prohibits a student from taking more than two courses concurrently without written approval from the Campus Director of Academic Affairs.
Federal regulations prohibit payment for auditing a course or payment for any course for which an assigned grade is not used in computing requirements for graduation. This includes repeats of grades
D or better, unless a higher grade is required, withdrawals and courses that are not applicable to the declared degree objective. This does not apply to repeats of required courses that a student has failed.

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Advancing Programs Policy
The purpose of this policy is to document the University’s treatment and determination of federal financial aid eligibility for students who advance programs (aka finish one program and begin another program) at the University.
If the student begins a new program at the University before the expiration of the prior program’s end of program (EOP) academic year, the University will award all federal financial aid to complete the remainder of the prior program’s EOP academic year.

Advancing Programs
A student who graduates from one program at the University and begins another program at the
University is a student who is advancing programs. Federal financial aid awards for students who advance programs will be based on whether or not the student has begun a new academic year or has an overlapping academic year with the prior program.

New Academic Year
A student who graduates from one program at the University and begins another program after the expiration of the prior program’s EOP academic year is a student who is advancing programs with a new academic year.
For these scenarios, the University will award the student all federal financial aid based on a full academic year as defined by the new program of study. (Refer to the Federal Pell Grant — IASG Policy,
Direct Loan Policy, and Campus-Based Policy for further information on awarding and the Academic
Year Definition Policy for further information on defined academic years.)

Overlapping Academic Years
A student who graduates from one program at the University and begins another program prior to the expiration of the prior program’s EOP academic year is a student who is advancing programs with overlapping academic years. If an overlapping academic year exists, the student is required to complete the academic year in terms of both instructional weeks and credits in the prior program.
For these scenarios, federal financial aid awards are determined as follows:
Federal Pell Grant Award

A student cannot receive more than his or her scheduled Federal Pell Grant award for a federal award year. (Refer to the Federal Pell Grant — IASG Policy for further information.) When a student has already received a Federal Pell Grant during the same federal award year, the University determines the percentage of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award that the student has received in order to calculate the student’s remaining eligibility (if any) for a Federal Pell Grant award.
To calculate the student’s remaining eligibility, the University uses the following formula:
Pell disbursed in prior program = % of scheduled award used
Scheduled award in prior program

The University then determines the maximum percentage of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant Award the student may receive in the new program by using the following formula:
(100% of scheduled award)
– (% of scheduled award used)
Maximum % of scheduled Pell award student may receive

When calculating the student’s Federal Pell Grant award, the University also ensures the student does not exceed the Pell Lifetime Eligibility Used (Pell LEU).

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The remaining Federal Pell Grant award amount is not divided equally across the payment periods in the new program. Instead, the Federal Pell Grant funds may be disbursed in an amount up to the student’s remaining eligibility for each payment period, except that no payment period disbursement can exceed 50% of the scheduled annual award.
Federal Pell Grant Example: A student graduates from the AAB program and advances to the BSBA program at the University. It is determined the student’s academic year for the AAB program overlaps with the academic year for the BSBA program.
Pell Data from the Prior Program at the University
Scheduled Pell award

$4,000

Pell award disbursed

$1,500

The University must now determine the student’s remaining Pell Grant eligibility for the federal award year to determine the amount it may actually award to the student.
Pell Calculations by the University
Scheduled Pell award
Percentage of Pell award already used in the prior program
(Pell award disbursed ÷ scheduled Pell award)
Percentage of remaining Pell eligibility
(100% – % used)
Student’s remaining Federal Pell Award
(Scheduled award at University X percentage remaining eligibility)

$4,000
$1,500 ÷ $4,000 = 37.5%
100% – 37.5% = 62.5%
$4,000 X 62.5% = $2,500

The student’s remaining Federal Pell Grant eligibility is $2,500. Since this amount is more than half of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award, the award must be disbursed in two payment periods. The student may receive half of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award in the first payment period as long as the first payment period is half an academic year, and the remainder of the amount in the second payment period. If the first payment period is not at least half an academic year, the Pell is disbursed based on the remaining credits in the academic year.
Pell Disbursements in the New Program at the University
First payment period
Second payment period

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$2,000
$500

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Federal Direct Loan Award

The University will award a Direct Loan in the new program for the remainder of the prior program’s EOP academic year as long as the student is enrolled at least half-time — i.e., at least six credit hours. (Refer to the Student/Parent Eligibility Policy for further information.) The loan period will cover the remaining credits and weeks of the overlapping academic year. The Direct Loan funds will not exceed the remaining balance of the student’s annual loan limit at the loan level associated with the new program.
Direct Loan example: A student graduates from the AAB program and advances to the BSBA program at the University. It is determined the student’s academic year for the AAB program overlaps with the academic year for the BSBA program. In the BSBA program, the student is a thirdyear, independent undergraduate student with a maximum annual Subsidized Loan eligibility of
$5,500 and Unsubsidized Loan eligibility of $7,000.
Direct Loan Data from the Prior Program at the University
Subsidized Loan disbursed

$1,688

Unsubsidized Loan disbursed

$2,250

The University must now determine the student’s remaining Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loan eligibility for the overlapping academic year in the BSBA program.
Direct Loan Calculations to Determine Remaining Eligibility for Overlapping AY
Remaining Subsidized Loan eligibility for overlapping AY
(Annual Subsidized Loan limit – Subsidized Loan funds already disbursed)

$5,500 – $1,688 = $3,812

Remaining Unsubsidized Loan Eligibility for Overlapping AY
(Annual Unsubsidized Loan limit – Unsubsidized Loan funds already disbursed)

$7,000 – $2,250 = $4,750

These remaining loan fund amounts will be disbursed based on the payment periods in the loan period at the University. (Refer to the Disbursements Policy for additional information.)
Other Federal Aid Awards

All other federal financial aid, including the Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) and Federal
TEACH Grant, follow the same awarding process of finishing out the prior program’s academic year.

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External Transfer Policy
The purpose of this policy is to document the University’s treatment and determination of federal financial aid eligibility for students who transfer to the University from another school.

External Transfers
Students who transfer to the University with or without accepted credits and who have overlapping academic years (AYs) with a prior school are referred to as external transfers. An overlapping AY exists if the student begins a program at the University prior to the expiration of the prior school’s AY. If the prior school’s AY length is less than 30 weeks, the University contacts the prior school to confirm the dates are correct or requests the school correct the dates in common origination and disbursement (COD).
The loan period (LP) — or payment period (PP), in the case of all other federal financial aid — to finish out the overlapping AY begins on the first day of courses at the University and ends on the inherited
AY end date of the prior school. If this date falls in the middle of a course at the University, the LP/PP and AY end dates are extended to reflect the end date of the last course on the student’s schedule that the student began prior to the inherited AY end date. If the inherited AY end date falls between courses scheduled, the inherited AY end date and the LP/PP end date to finish out the overlap reflects the inherited end date of the prior school.
When awarding federal financial aid for the overlapping AY, the University determines the number of credits required to complete the overlapping AY. The student must be enrolled at least half-time —
i.e., at least six credit hours in the LP that is finishing out the overlapping AY — in order to be eligible for Direct Loans. (Refer to the Student/Parent Eligibility Policy for additional information.)
The student must successfully complete the required number of credits in order to progress to the next AY and LP. The AY and LP are extended, as needed, until the student earns these credits.
Therefore, if the student receives a W or F for courses in the overlap, the end dates of the overlapping
AY and LP are extended, as needed, until the student earns these credits. Similarly, if the student receives an I grade or is granted an extension on time to complete coursework, the required number of credits are not successfully earned, and the overlapping AY and LP must be extended.

Federal Pell Grant Award
Students who transfer to the University after receiving a Federal Pell Grant at a previous school during the same award year may receive a Federal Pell Grant only if:
• The student submits a valid SAR to the University; or
• The University obtains a valid ISIR.
A student cannot receive more than his or her scheduled Pell award for a federal award year. (Refer to the Federal Pell Grant — IASG Policy for additional information.) When a student has already received a Federal Pell Grant during the same federal award year, the University determines the percentage of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award that the student has already received in order to calculate the student’s remaining eligibility (if any) for a Federal Pell Grant award.
To calculate the student’s remaining eligibility, the University uses the following formula:
Pell disbursed at prior school
Scheduled award at prior school

= % of scheduled award used

The University then subtracts the percentage of scheduled award used from 100 to calculate the maximum percentage of the scheduled award the student may receive at the University. The University determines the Federal Pell Grant Award the student is eligible for by using the following formula:
(Maximum % of scheduled award remaining)
X (Scheduled award at university)
Maximum Pell award

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When calculating the student’s Federal Pell Grant award, the University also ensures the student does not exceed the Pell Lifetime Eligibility Used (Pell LEU).
The remaining Federal Pell Grant award amount is not divided equally across the PPs in the new program.
Instead, the Federal Pell Grant funds may be disbursed in an amount up to the student’s remaining eligibility for each PP, except that no PP disbursement can exceed 50% of the scheduled annual award.
Pell Grant example: A student received a portion of a Federal Pell Grant at a community college, and then transferred to the University during the same federal award year. The community college performed a Return to Title IV (R2T4) calculation and returned a portion of the student’s Federal Pell Grant award.
Pell Data from the Community College
Scheduled Pell award

$3,000

Pell award disbursed

$1,500

Amount of Pell funds returned due to R2T4 calculation
Net amount of Pell funds disbursed to student

$300
$1,200

The University’s cost of attendance is higher than the community college, which increases the student’s scheduled Federal Pell Grant to $4,000 for the federal award year. The University must now determine the student’s remaining Federal Pell Grant eligibility for the federal award year to determine the amount it may actually award to the student.
Pell Calculations to Determine Remaining Pell Eligibility
Scheduled Pell award at the University
Percentage of Pell award already used
(Net Pell disbursed ÷ Scheduled Pell award at prior school)
Percentage of remaining Pell eligibility
(100% – Percentage used)
Student’s remaining Federal Pell Grant Award
(Scheduled award at University X Percentage remaining eligibility)

$4,000
$1,200 ÷ $3,000 = 40%
100% – 40% = 60%
$4,000 X 60% = $2,400

The student’s remaining Federal Pell Grant eligibility is $2,400. Since this amount is more than half of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award, the award must be disbursed in two payment periods. As long as the student’s first PP in the new program is at least half of an AY (in both credits and weeks), the student may receive half of the scheduled award in the first PP. If the second PP in the new program falls in the same federal award year, the student will receive the remainder of the Federal
Pell Grant amount in the second PP.
Pell Disbursements at the University
First payment period
Second payment period

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$2,000
$400

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Federal Direct Loan Award

The loan at the University may not exceed the remaining balance of the student’s annual loan limits after the disbursements at the previous school are considered. If the balance of the program is less than an AY, those Direct Loans originated for a single PP are disbursed in two disbursements. (Refer to the Disbursements Policy for additional information.)
Direct Loan example: A student received a portion of a Direct Loan at a community college, and then transferred to the University during the same AY, creating an overlapping AY at the University. When the student transferred, the community college performed a Return to Title IV (R2T4) calculation and returned a portion of the student’s Direct Loan funds. The student is enrolled at the University as a first-year independent undergraduate student with maximum annual Subsidized Loan eligibility of
$3,500 and Unsubsidized Loan eligibility of $6,000.
Direct Loan Data from the Community College
Subsidized Loan originally disbursed
Subsidized Loan funds returned due to R2T4 calculation

$1,750
$0

Net Subsidized Loan funds disbursed

$1,750

Unsubsidized Loan originally disbursed

$3,000

Unsubsidized Loan funds returned due to R2T4 calculation

$1,000

Net Unsubsidized Loan funds disbursed

$2,000

The University must now determine the student’s remaining Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loan eligibility for the overlapping AY.
Direct Loan Calculations to Determine Remaining Eligibility for Overlapping AY
Remaining Subsidized Loan eligibility
(Annual Subsidized Loan limit – Net Subsidized Loan funds disbursed)
Remaining Unsubsidized Loan Eligibility
(Annual Unsubsidized Loan limit – Net Unsubsidized Loan funds disbursed)

$3,500 – $1,750 = $1,750
$6,000 – $2,000 = $4,000

These remaining loan fund amounts will be disbursed based on the PPs in the LP at the University.
(Refer to the Disbursements Policy for additional information.)
Other Federal Aid Awards

All other federal financial aid, including the Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) and
Federal TEACH Grant, will follow this same awarding process of finishing out the overlapping AY.

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Program Changes Policy
The purpose of this policy is to document the University’s treatment and determination of federal financial aid eligibility for students who change programs during an open payment period at the University.

Program Changes
Federal regulations require the University to evaluate the federal financial aid award for a student who has changed programs during an open payment period to determine whether or not the student may remain in the same payment period or if the student will be required to begin a new academic year
(AY) and payment period. For a student to be considered in the same payment period, all five (5) of the following conditions must be met:
• The student is continuously enrolled at the University.
• The courses in the payment period the student is transferring out of are substantially similar to the courses the student will be taking in the new program, and credits associated with the courses transfer to the new program.
• The payment periods are substantially equal in weeks of instruction and credit hours.
• There are little or no changes in tuition and fee charges associated with the payment period.
• The credits successfully completed and earned in the payment period for the program the student is transferring out of are accepted for credit in the new program.

If All Five Conditions Are Met
If all five (5) conditions are met, the student will remain in the original payment period and AY.
However, adjustments to disbursement dates, payment period start and end dates, and the AY end date may be made to address any changes to when the student will complete the required credit hours and weeks of instructional time of the AY.

If All Five Conditions Are Not Met
If all five (5) conditions are not met, the University will perform a Return of Title IV (R2T4) calculation to withdraw the student from the payment period for the program the student is transferring out of and update the program’s AY/loan period (LP) accordingly. (Please refer to the Return to Title IV Policy for additional information.)
Once the Return to Title IV (R2T4) calculation has been completed and all required federal aid funds returned as required, the University will package the student for the new program based on a new AY/
LP as follows:
Federal Pell Grant Award

If the student is eligible for the Federal Pell Grant, the University must identify the amounts of Federal
Pell Grant already received for the federal award year in the program the student transferred out of and determine the percentage of the student’s annual scheduled Federal Pell Grant award already used.
To calculate the student’s remaining eligibility, the University uses the following formula:
Pell disbursed in prior program
= % of scheduled award used
Scheduled award in prior program

The University then determines the maximum percentage of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award the student may receive in the new program by using the following formula:
100% of scheduled award
– % of scheduled award used
Maximum % of scheduled Pell award student may receive

When calculating the student’s Federal Pell Grant award, the University will also ensure the student does not exceed the Pell Lifetime Eligibility Used (Pell LEU).

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The remaining Federal Pell Grant award amount is not divided equally across the payment periods in the new program. Instead, the Federal Pell Grant funds may be disbursed in an amount up to the student’s remaining eligibility for each payment period, except that no payment period disbursement can exceed 50% of the scheduled annual award.
Federal Pell Grant example: A student transfers from the AAB program to the BSBA program at the
University and all five conditions are NOT met.
Pell Data from the Prior Program at the University
Scheduled Pell award

$4,000

Pell award kept as a result of the R2T4 calculation

$1,500

The University must now determine the student’s remaining Pell eligibility for the federal award year to determine the amount it may actually award to the student.
Pell Calculations by the University
Scheduled Pell award
Percentage of Pell award already used in the prior program
(Pell award disbursed ÷ Scheduled Pell award)
Percentage of remaining Pell eligibility
(100% – Percentage used)
Student’s remaining Federal Pell award
(Scheduled award at University X Percentage remaining eligibility)

$4,000
$1,500 ÷ $4,000 = 37.5%
100% – 37.5% = 62.5%
$4,000 X 62.5% = $2,500

The student’s remaining Federal Pell Grant eligibility is $2,500. Since this amount is more than half of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award, the award must be disbursed in two payment periods. The student may receive half of the scheduled Federal Pell Grant award in the first payment period, and the remainder of the amount in the second payment period as long as the second payment period falls in the same award year.
Pell Disbursements in the New Program at the University
First payment period
Second payment period

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$2,000
$500

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Federal Direct Loan Award

If the student is eligible for the Federal Subsidized and/or Unsubsidized Direct Loan program, the new
AY/LP will be a full AY/LP and will be limited to the student’s remaining annual loan eligibility if the new program is at least an academic year in length. If the new program is less than an academic year in length or the remaining coursework represents less than an academic year in length, the student’s annual loan limit eligibility is the lesser of the remaining annual loan eligibility or the prorated loan eligibility based on credit hours to be completed in the new program.
Federal Direct Loan example: A student transfers from the AAB program to the BSBA program at the University, and all five conditions are NOT met. In the BSBA program, the student is a third-year, independent undergraduate student with a maximum annual Subsidized Loan eligibility of $5,500 and Unsubsidized Loan eligibility of $7,000.
Direct Loan Data from the Prior Program at the University
Subsidized Loan disbursed

$1,688

Unsubsidized Loan disbursed

$2,250

The University must now determine the student’s remaining Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loan eligibility for the overlapping academic year in the BSBA program.
Direct Loan Calculations to Determine Remaining Eligibility for New Loan Period in New Program
Remaining Subsidized Loan Eligibility for New Programs LP
(Annual Subsidized Loan limit – Subsidized Loan funds already disbursed)

$5,500 – $1,688 = $3,812

Remaining Unsubsidized Loan Eligibility for New Programs LP
(Annual Unsubsidized Loan limit – Unsubsidized Loan funds already disbursed)

$7,000 – $2,250 = $4,750

These remaining loan fund amounts will be disbursed based on the payment periods in the new program’s loan period at the University. (Refer to the Disbursements Policy for additional information.)

Program Change After Payment Period Is Completed
If the student changes programs after successfully completing a payment period and prior to starting another payment period, regardless of the five (5) conditions, the University will not perform an R2T4 calculation because the student completed the payment period for which funds were disbursed. Students in these scenarios will remain in the same AY/LP and will be required to complete the remaining credits and weeks of the AY/LP.

Program Change Effective Date
The program change effective date will be the start date of the first course the student will attend in the new program. This is also known as the program begin date.

Program Version Changes
A student enrolled at the University who changes versions of a program is not a student who is changing programs for federal financial aid purposes. Therefore, the University will not reevaluate payment periods for students changing versions of the same program at the University.

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Re-entry Policy
Federal regulations require certain procedures take place when a student withdraws from the
University and re-enters the same program within 180 days, or withdraws from the University and re-enters after 180 days. The 180-day break is determined by counting the days between the student’s official last date of attendance (OLDA) and the course start date when the student returns. This federal financial aid Re-entry policy is separate from the institution’s Academic Program Re-entry policy.

Re-entry Within 180 days
When a student withdraws from the University and re-enters within 180 days to the same program at the
University, the student remains in the same payment period the student was in when originally withdrawn.
The cost of attendance (COA) for a student who re-enters within 180 days will reflect the original educational costs associated with the payment period from which the student withdrew.
The student is immediately eligible to receive all federal financial aid funds returned when the student withdrew. The University will take the following actions, if applicable, for a student who re-enters the same program within 180 days:
• Re-disburse federal financial aid that was disbursed and returned under the Return of Title IV
(R2T4) provisions.
• Disburse federal financial aid the student was otherwise eligible for that had not yet been disbursed at the time the student withdrew.
• Cancel any overpayments assessed to the student as a result of the prior withdrawal that were disbursed on re-entry.
The student becomes eligible for subsequent federal financial aid payments when the payment period for which he or she was paid is completed.
If the date of a student’s return is outside the period for which the loan was originated, the University will extend the original loan period (LP) and originate a new loan. Additionally, if the scheduled date for a second disbursement is outside the period the loan was originated, the University will extend the LP and the date(s) for the second and any subsequent disbursement.
If a student returns to the University within 180 days and before federal financial aid funds are returned due to an R2T4 calculation, the University will not return the funds.
If a student withdrew, had a previous overpayment referred to Debt Resolution Services, and reenters within 180 days, the University will send Debt Resolution Services a fax identifying the student overpayment. The fax will state the overpayment should be made void as the student has returned to the University.

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Re-entry Within 180 Days and in a New Federal Award Year
If a student re-enters the University within 180 days and was originally enrolled in a payment period that began and was scheduled to end in one federal award year, but returns after the end of that federal award year, the University will disburse any remaining funds using the original federal award year. The University will follow this process as long as the original federal award year is still open. If the original federal award year is closed and the student is due additional Pell funds from the closed federal award year, the University will request the Pell Grant funds through the COD website.
If the student was originally awarded campus-based funds and the funds are no longer available from the original federal award year, the University may award funds from the current federal award year if funds are available. However, this does not increase the annual maximum campus-based funds award a student may receive.
If the student was awarded Direct Loan (DL) funds and the original federal award year is still open, the
University will recover the DL funds from that federal award year. If the original federal award year is closed, the University will award the student remaining DL funds using current federal award year paperwork. However, the original LP dates along with original cost of attendance and expected family contribution will be used to award the remaining DL funds.

Re-entry After 180 days or Re-entry into a Different Program
When a student withdraws from the University and re-enters after 180 days have elapsed or reenters into a different program of study at any time, the University will award the student based on new payment periods. The length of the program will be the number of credit hours and weeks of instructional time remaining in the program the student re-enters. If the remaining credit hours and weeks of instruction constitute one-half of an academic year (AY) or less, the remaining hours will constitute one payment period.
If the start of the new AY overlaps with a previous AY, meaning the start of the new program begins before the calendar end date of the previous program’s AY, prior funds disbursed will be taken into consideration when packaging the student for the new program.

Consortium Agreements
Purpose
Written arrangements consist of consortium and contractual agreements. The purpose of this policy is to document the University’s position on participating in consortium agreements with other institutions for the purpose of receiving or processing federal financial aid funds.

Policy
The University chooses to not participate in consortium agreements, defined as written agreements between two or more federal financial aid (Title IV) eligible institutions. Therefore, the University will not provide signature or approval on any consortium agreement submitted, whether as a host or home institution.

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Verification
A federal financial aid student may be chosen to participate in the verification process by the U.S.
Department of Education Central Processing System. The Central Processing System prints an asterisk next to the expected family contribution (EFC) on the Student Aid Report (SAR) or SAR
Acknowledgement to identify the student has been selected for verification.
The purpose of verification is to maintain the integrity of federal financial aid programs by verifying the information provided by students and parents on financial aid applications.
If a student is selected for verification, the University will request the student provide all applicable documentation, which may include, but is not limited to, the following:










IRS-issued federal tax return transcript(s)
IRS W-2 form for each source of employment income
Verification worksheet
V
 erification of household member(s) receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
Program (SNAP) benefits
Verification of child support paid
Verification of untaxed income
Documentation of high school completion
Government-issued photo identification
––  o comply with 18 USC § 701, the University is unable to make or accept photo copies
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of military identification cards. Copies of military identification cards will not be accepted.
Statement of Educational Purpose
Additional documents may be required by the University to complete the verification process.
A student will receive written notification from the University of verification requirements, required documentation and the timelines for completion of the process.
The student must return any requested verification documents within 30 days of receiving written notification from the University. If verification documents are not received within this timeframe, the University will cease processing his or her financial aid request.
Applicants selected for verification must complete the process by the federally published deadline,
Sept. 26, 2016, or 120 days after the last day of the student’s enrollment, whichever is earlier.

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Cost of Attendance Policy
A student’s cost of attendance (COA) is established solely for use in calculating federal financial aid eligibility and awarding financial aid, for a specific period of enrollment. The University reviews and, if necessary, updates each component annually, referencing the College Board website at http:// professionals.collegeboard.com/higher-ed and actual institutional data. The University uses estimated monthly living expenses, and an average cost of tuition, electronic course materials and books.
Amounts used in this year’s federal cost of attendance (COA) are as follows:
Ground Campuses
Undergraduate
Certificate2

Undergraduate
Degree

Graduate
Certificate 2

Graduate
Degree

Tuition

$8,190

$11,184

$12,312

$14,832

rEsource & Loan Fees

$900

$1,224

$1,440

$1,464

Cost of Attendance Components

Living Expense

$10,368

Annual COA

$12,960

$15,552

$15,552

$19,458

1

$25,368

$29,304

$31,848

Note: Military is assumed as all active for average weighting of tuition.
1  ousing expense for Military Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) is reduced by 72%. Living expenses include allowances
H
for room and board, transportation and miscellaneous educational expenses.
2 The figures provided for certificate programs are illustrative and based on 18 credits for undergraduate certificates and

24 credits for graduate certificates.

Online Campus
Associate
Degree

Undergraduate
Certificate 2

Undergraduate
Degree

Graduate
Certificate 2

Graduate
Degree

Doctoral
Degree

Tuition

$9,720

$9,108

$11,904

$10,350

$16,560

$19,296

rEsource & Loan Fees

$1,176

$900

$1,224

$900

$1,464

$1,536

Cost of Attendance Components

Living Expense

$11,664

$10,368

$12,960

$10,368

$15,552

$15,552

Annual COA

$22,560

$20,376

$26,088

$21,618

$33,576

$36,384

1

Note: Military is assumed as all active for average weighting of tuition.
1  ousing expense for Military Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) is reduced by 72%. Living expenses include allowances
H
for room and board, transportation and miscellaneous educational expenses.
2  he figures provided for certificate programs are illustrative and based on 18 credits for undergraduate certificates and
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15 credits for graduate certificates.

For detailed information regarding actual tuition fees for programs and locations, contact a Finance
Advisor or visit the tuition and fees calculator web page at http://www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_ financial_options/tuition_and_fees.html Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Policy
The University uses an average monthly cost of living expense, based on the following:





Seven months for certificate-seeking students
Nine months for associate degree-seeking students
Ten months for bachelor’s degree-seeking students
Twelve months for graduate students
The University COA consists of the following components:









Tuition
Electronic Course Materials and Books (resource fees)
Living Expense
Housing
Transportation
Miscellaneous (school supplies and personal expenses)
Loan Fees
If a student is attending less than half-time, the COA is made up of the following components:

• Tuition
• Electronic Course Materials and Books (rEsource Fees)

Tuition
Average tuition rates are obtained annually for online programs, and programs for each certificate and degree level. The tuition expense for the COA is an average based on modality and certificate and degree level. The University documents how averages are calculated and makes this information available upon request. Exceptions include professional judgment decisions and elimination of an overaward using actual tuition costs. If a student’s period of enrollment is less than a full academic year, costs are adjusted to match the period of enrollment.

Electronic Course Materials and Books
This mandatory fee encompasses course electronic textbooks and electronic materials, the University library, eBook collection, math labs, programming software, the Centers for Math and Writing
Excellence, and Phoenix Career Guidance System™.

Living Expenses
The monthly living expense component is based on the low budget for a 12-month academic year, as published by the College Board at http://professionals.collegeboard.com/higher-ed/financial-aid/ living-expense. This is used to calculate a monthly living expense amount used for students of all regions and states. The monthly living expense is multiplied by the months in the loan period, based on the degree level. Students receiving military housing assistance will have a reduction in living expenses in the amount of the housing allowance.

End of Program Periods
The end of program (EOP) COA is based on the credits required to complete the program and the weeks of instructional time, converted to months, needed to complete those credits. The months are rounded up and multiplied by the monthly living expense amount to determine the EOP COA.
The COA will not increase if a remaining period needs to be extended due to the student failing or withdrawing from a course(s) in the prorated period.

Loan Fees
The University calculates an average loan fee by performing a separate calculation for undergraduate and graduate students.

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Incarcerated Students
The COA for incarcerated students is limited to tuition, course material fees, and books and supplies, if required in the program of study. (Refer to the Student/Parent Eligibility Policy for further information.)

Tribal Budget
The University prepares a separate tribal budget for students who receive tribal funding. The tribal budget consists of actual tuition rates for the tuition component and may include a child/dependent care average component obtained from the National Association of Childcare Resource and Referral
Agency (NACCRRA). The University averages each childcare type for weekly and hourly cost for each state. Documentation is available for review, upon request.

Minnesota Child Care Budget
For students who are receiving the Minnesota Postsecondary Child Care Grant, the University will add actual childcare costs to the cost of attendance before computing financial need. This amount will be captured in the application process.

Grade-Level Determination
Determination of grade level is an important part of calculating eligibility for federal and state financial aid. The University determines the student’s grade level by calculating the total number of credits that have been completed at the beginning of an academic year. For example, a student with 12 transfer credits at the start of his or her program at the University will be considered a grade level 1 student.
After the completion of one academic year of 24 credits, the student will have a total of 36 credits completed, making the student eligible for grade level 2 loans in his or her second academic year.
The following chart illustrates the number of credits required to complete each grade level.
Undergraduate Grade-Level Determination
Grade Level

Credits Applied in Primary Program
(includes Transfer Credit)

GL 1 (freshman)

0–24

GL 2 (sophomore)

24–48

GL 3 (junior)

49–72

GL 2 (senior)

73+

Note: A student in a two-year program cannot receive more than a grade level 2 (GL 2) annual loan limit in any given year, no matter how long it takes to complete the program. A student in an undergraduate certificate program cannot receive more than a grade level 1 (GL 1) annual loan limit in any given year, no matter how long it takes to complete the undergraduate certificate.
For information on academic year definitions, please see the Financial Aid Awarding section.

1  he IX grade is only given to eligible students who require special accommodations (Americans with Disabilities Act) and
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provides additional time to complete a course. Faculty may select a completion date ranging from 5 to 15 weeks. The IX grade will default to an F grade when the course exceeds the completion date.
2  C grade (effective for classes in progress 9/9/2006): No grade was issued. No credits awarded. A QC is awarded in the
Q
following instances:
1. This grade may be used for zero-credit courses once the attendance requirement has been satisfied.
2. A QC grade may automatically post for certain doctoral and counseling courses when the IP period expires and

no formal grade has been submitted.
3. A QC grade is not calculated into the GPA.
4. This grade allows students to repeat a course (doctoral dissertations, etc.) without penalizing their GPA.
5. The QC grade is available using a drop-down menu on eCampus.

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Conflicting Information
If the University has conflicting information concerning a student’s eligibility or has any reason to believe a student’s application information is incorrect, the University will resolve such discrepancies before disbursing student financial aid funds. If discrepancies are discovered after disbursing student financial aid funds, the University will reconcile the conflicting information and require the student to repay any funds for which he or she was ineligible. Examples of conflicting information may include, but are not limited to, the following:







Social Security numbers
Date of birth
Legal name
Discrepant tax data (including whether or not the student/parent was required to file a tax return)
Household size or marital status
Citizenship status

Other Resources
Students are required to disclose financial assistance that will be paid by a third party on their behalf.
When a portion of a student’s cost of attendance is waived or paid by another source, other than federal financial aid, this is considered other resources. Examples of other resources include, but are not limited to, the following:












External grants and scholarships
University grants and scholarships
Tuition assistance
Military tuition benefits
University tuition discounts and waivers
University administration tuition and/or student account adjustments
Income from insurance programs that pay for the student’s education
Private loans
Private and state grants
Tribal aid
Other financial assistance paid directly to the University
Note: Adjustments to tuition due to an approved leave of absence, early payment discounts and cash payments made by the student will not count as other resources.
A student must have financial need to receive all federal financial aid funds except for Direct
Unsubsidized and PLUS Loans under the Direct Loans program. As such, a student’s expected family contribution and other resources will be subtracted from the cost of attendance when determining eligibility for federal financial aid (Title IV). All awards, including need and non-need-based aid, cannot exceed a student’s annual cost of attendance.
If the University receives additional other resources that cause the student to exceed the cost of attendance, it will adjust the awards appropriately to eliminate the overaward. This may include reducing future disbursements for a second or subsequent payment period or returning awards to the funding source. Funds will be returned in the order most beneficial to the student.

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Satisfactory Academic Progress
Information regarding University academic progress standards for individual programs and information regarding the University’s Program and Cumulative Grade Point Average policy may be found under the Academic Policies section of the appropriate University Academic Catalog at http://www.phoenix.edu/programs/degree-programs/academic-catalog.html Satisfactory Academic Progress for DVA Education Benefits
To receive Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) education benefits, a student must maintain satisfactory academic progress (SAP) and conduct. Accordingly, benefits will be terminated for individuals who are disqualified, suspended or expelled from the University.

Academic Probation
Academic probation (AP) shall occur when a grade point average (GPA) falls below acceptable levels for the program. Probation lasts for a period of four consecutive program-applicable courses. Concurrent enrollment is prohibited during the four-course AP sequence.
Associate degree students enrolled at the online campus should continue traditional block scheduling format with concurrent enrollment in two courses (excluding AACR and AAPF). In graduate programs, the four-course sequence excludes any undergraduate prerequisite courses.
Financial aid students will continue to receive funds during the probationary period.
Veteran students will continue to receive DVA education benefits during the probation period.
The veteran will be informed of the probation, and a notation to the student DVA file will be recorded when the probationary period commenced.

Academic Disqualification
Academic disqualification (AD) will result if a student fails to clear an academic probation status within four courses from the onset of probation. Veteran students will not be eligible for DVA educational benefits after disqualification. The DVA and student will be notified of the disqualification.
To reapply, a formal application for admission must be submitted in accordance with University admission procedures. In addition, applicants should explain the reasons for the scholastic deficiencies; the manner in which the intervening time has been spent; and why they should be given favorable consideration for readmission.
The readmission file will be reviewed by the Student Appeals Center and a decision reached regarding readmission. If approved, the student would be required to complete all program requirements in effect at the time of readmission. An application for DVA education benefits will also be necessary to re-establish benefits with University of Phoenix. If readmission to the University is approved, please contact your
Academic Advisor to determine if your chosen program remains eligible for DVA education benefits.

Federal Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy
Purpose
Federal regulations require institutions to establish a reasonable satisfactory academic progress
(SAP) policy for determining whether an otherwise eligible student is meeting SAP in an educational program and may receive financial aid under the Title IV HEA programs. The policy must be as strict as the policy the institution applies to a student who is not receiving federal financial aid under the
Title IV HEA programs.

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Policy
Students must maintain SAP throughout the duration of their academic program to remain eligible for federal financial aid. SAP is assessed by qualitative and quantitative measures and is evaluated at the end of each completed payment period in the student’s academic program.

Qualitative Measure
Grade Point Average

Undergraduate students must have a cumulative program grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 at the end of each completed payment period, unless otherwise defined by academic policy. Graduate students must have a program GPA of 3.0 at the end of each completed payment period.
A student’s cumulative program GPA is calculated using only those grades earned at the University for the current program of the student. The program GPA is computed by adding the program applicable cumulative grade quality points earned (calculated by multiplying the credit hours and the weight of the grade earned in the course) and dividing it by the program applicable cumulative total number of credit hours completed.
Courses from which the student withdraws are not included in the program GPA calculation for the qualitative measurement.

Qualitative Exclusions
The following are excluded from the qualitative computation:
• Waivers
• National Testing Programs
• Courses with the following grades:
–– In Progress Extension (IX)1 (provided there is no formal grade)
–– Audit (AU)
–– Incomplete (I)
–– In Progress (IP)
–– No Grade Awarded (QC)2
–– Passing (P)
–– Withdrawal (W)
–– Withdrawal/Failing (WF)
–– Waived with Credit (WC)
–– No Credit (NC)
• Orientations with the following completion statuses:
–– Orientation Complete (OC)
–– Orientation Not Complete (ON)
–– Orientation Extension (OX)
• Assessed Credits

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Quantitative Measure
Each academic program has a published standard credit load for completion. Pace of completion is automatically evaluated for all periods of attendance at the University, including periods the student did not receive federal financial aid.
Maximum Timeframe

The maximum timeframe to complete the program cannot exceed 150% of the published length of the program measured in credit hours attempted for undergraduate and graduate students. Progress is evaluated cumulatively at the completion of each payment period for a student’s primary program of study to ensure completion of the program within the 150% maximum timeframe.
If a student cannot complete the program of study within the maximum timeframe (as determined at the end of the payment period), the student will be placed on financial aid disqualification (FD) status without the ability to appeal.
Pace of Completion

The quantitative measure for the pace of completion is calculated using the following formula:
Cumulative number of credit hours the student successfully completed
Cumulative number of credit hours the student attempted

At the end of each payment period, the student’s pace of completion is evaluated. Students must earn at least 67% of the credit hours attempted toward completion of the primary program of study.
Credit hours taken at other institutions and accepted toward a student’s primary program of study at the University are included in both attempted and completed credit hours when measuring pace of completion.
Courses from which the student withdraws are counted as attempted credit hours when calculating the quantitative measurement or program pace.
Included in Pace of Completion

The following are included as attempted in the pace of completion calculation:









Courses that are waived with credit (WC)
Assessed credits
Withdrawal (W)
Withdrawal/Failing (WF)
Courses completed with the following grades: A, B, C, D and F (+/–)
In progress (IP)
Incompletes (I, IX and IF)
No grade awarded (QC)
Evaluation

The University evaluates SAP for the student’s primary program of study, based on a completed payment period (generally, at least 12 credit hours). As a result of the evaluation, a student is assigned a Federal SAP status.
Financial Aid Warning

Undergraduate students with less than a cumulative 2.0 GPA, or the minimum as stated in policy, and graduate students with less than a 3.0 OR who do not earn 67% of their attempted credits
(cumulatively) at the end of a completed payment period, are automatically placed on financial aid warning (FW) status. The University can disburse federal financial aid funds to students on FW status for one payment period.

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Financial Aid Disqualification

If a student on FW status does not meet SAP at the end of the subsequent completed payment period, the student is not eligible for additional federal financial aid and will be placed on an FD status.
Students who are placed on an FD status are ineligible for federal financial aid.
Financial Aid Probation

Students who are granted an appeal will be placed on financial aid probation (FP) status and will have their financial aid eligibility reinstated based on the appeal. The University can disburse federal financial aid funds to students on FP status for one probationary payment period, provided all other eligibility requirements are met. The student must meet the University’s SAP standards to maintain federal financial aid eligibility.
Student Notification

The University will notify students at any point during their enrollment if they are placed on or taken off the FW, FP, FD or Regular Student (RG) statuses, as these affect student eligibility to receive federal financial aid.
Student Financial Aid Appeals

Students placed on FD status due to a violation of the qualitative and/or quantitative standards during the financial aid warning period may appeal the disqualification to regain eligibility for federal financial aid. Students may do so by submitting an appeal to the Student Financial Services —
Operations Professional Judgment (SFS-OPJ) Team. The SAP-OPJ form is located on the University’s financial aid website. If there are unusual circumstances that should be considered during the appeal process, federal financial aid reinstatement may be possible during a financial aid probation period.
Approval and/or reinstatement of federal financial aid eligibility are not guaranteed. The SAP PJ
Team reviews all appeals on a case-by-case basis. Approval is only granted when there are significant extenuating circumstances. All decisions made by the SAP PJ Team are final.
The University allows a student to have a maximum of two approved appeals during his or her time at the University. These appeals cannot be consecutive and are only considered if unusual circumstances exist. Examples of unusual circumstances may include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Death of a relative
• An injury or illness of the student
• Other special circumstances
Students must explain in the appeals process why the nature and timing of their unusual circumstance(s) directly prohibited them from maintaining SAP, and what has changed in their situation that would allow them to demonstrate SAP at the next evaluation. If students have more than 12 credits remaining in their program of study, they must demonstrate the ability to graduate within the maximum timeframe allowed and meet the GPA requirements. If students have 12 or less credits remaining, they must demonstrate the ability to complete the remaining credits successfully.

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Regaining Eligibility after Payment Period of Ineligibility

A student who is not making SAP regains eligibility only when the student is in compliance with the
University’s SAP requirements. Therefore, if a student loses eligibility for federal financial aid as a result of not meeting SAP requirements, the student must pay for the ineligible payment period using non-federal financial aid funds. If the student meets all SAP criteria after the ineligible payment period, the student’s borrow-based academic year (BBAY) will start at the beginning of the eligible payment period following the period of ineligibility. The BBAY is packaged for a full 24 credits and 30 weeks of instructional time.
If the ineligible payment period is the second payment period of an academic year/loan period already established, any federal financial aid awarded for the second payment period will be canceled and, if necessary, returned to the funding source.
Maximum Timeframe

If at any time during the evaluation period it is determined a student is not going to complete the program of study within the maximum timeframe of 150% of the length of the educational program, the student becomes ineligible for federal financial aid. This determination cannot be appealed.
Transfer Credits — Qualitative

A student’s program GPA is calculated using only grades earned at the University in courses that are applicable to the program. Therefore, transfer credits do not apply when calculating the student’s
GPA at the University. Transfer credits include credits for all courses not completed at the University that are applied toward the completion of the student’s degree program.
Transfer Credits — Quantitative

Credits taken at other institutions and applied toward the student’s program/version at the
University are included in both attempted and completed hours when measuring the student’s pace toward completion. Students who change program/versions at the University will be re-evaluated to determine which credits apply to the new program/version.
Program Changes

Students who change programs at the University are re-evaluated to determine which credits apply to the new program. The student’s SAP status will be reset with an effective date of the program change and will be evaluated at the end of each completed payment period in the new program. If the student changes back to a program he or she was previously in, the student’s SAP status will reflect the status of the original program.
Repeat Courses

Grades for prior attempts are excluded when calculating the qualitative component. However, credits from all attempts are included when assessing if the student meets the quantitative component.
Although a student may successfully complete a course more than once, only the first passing grade is counted as a completion when calculating the quantitative component.
Concurrent Enrollment

The University evaluates SAP for the primary program based on completed weeks and credits of a payment period, regardless of whether or not the student is enrolled concurrently. All credits completed at the University applicable to the primary program will apply toward the primary program’s GPA.

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Professional Judgment
The University may exercise discretion to accommodate special circumstances, with respect to some aspects of eligibility, using professional judgment. Professional judgment allows the University to treat a student individually when the student has special circumstances not sufficiently addressed by standard procedures. The University uses professional judgment on a case-by-case basis.
Special circumstances will include conditions that differentiate an individual student from a whole class of students. The University will not accept professional judgments made for a student by another school, but will independently review the circumstances and, if appropriate, document the professional judgment decision. The decision of the University regarding professional judgment is final and cannot be appealed to the U.S. Department of Education.
A student should contact a Finance Advisor if interested in submitting a professional judgment request.
Note: The University will complete verification before exercising professional judgment for students who have been selected for verification.

Determining Enrollment at the University
Active enrollment is determined by a student’s continuous attendance at the University. A student is considered to be in continuous attendance as long as no more than 14 days exists between academically related activities (ARAs). For exceptions to this 14-day requirement, please refer to
Withdrawing from the University. For additional information, please see Academically Related
Activities below. Students may have one of the following active enrollment statuses based upon the academic workload for his or her program:
Active Full-Time: The student’s required academic workload for his or her program is at least 6 credits for an academic year, the student is actively attending class and the student’s official last date of attendance based on ARAs does not exceed 14 days. Institutionally Scheduled Breaks and
Incomplete Grade Extensions are excluded from the 14 day out of attendance calculation.
Active Less Than Half Time: The student’s required academic workload for his or her program amounts to less than the 6 credits for an academic year, as determined by the institution. In addition, the student is actively attending class and student’s official last date of attendance based on ARAs does not exceed 14 days. Institutionally Scheduled Breaks and Incomplete Grade Extensions are excluded from the 14 day out of attendance calculation.

Academically Related Activities
ARAs are used to determine a student’s official last date of attendance and corresponding enrollment status at the University. ARAs are also used to determine the effective date of active and withdrawn enrollment statuses.
The following activities that occur on or after the course start date and on or before the course end date will be considered academically related activities by the University:






Postings/Messages in a course (online, directed study and online weeks of FlexNet® courses)
Assignment submissions posted via the online classroom
Quiz/Exam submissions recorded by the system via the online classroom
Learning Team acknowledgements via the online classroom
Physical attendance verified by a signed attendance roster (local campus courses only)
Exception: ARAs will not generate for activities in Audited (AU) courses.

Institutionally Scheduled Break
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The University’s institutionally scheduled break for the 2015/2016 award year is Dec. 23, 2015 – Jan. 1, 2016.

Course Attendance Policy
Attendance at all scheduled class meetings is required. Students are responsible for scheduling and planning ahead for any absences that may occur during a course to the extent possible. For more information, please see Unexcused Absence Policy.

Online Class Attendance
In order to be in attendance during a week, a student must post at least one (1) message, assignment submission or quiz/exam that is recorded by the system in the online classroom on two (2) separate days during the online week. Deadlines for attendance are based on Mountain Standard Time.
Attendance is tracked automatically in all online courses.

Local Campus Class Attendance
Students must physically attend the local campus workshop meeting during the scheduled class and sign the attendance roster in order to be in attendance. Most local campus courses meet four hours per week.

Directed Study Class Attendance
Attendance in directed study courses is tracked in the same manner for both the local campus and online modalities. A directed study student receives automatic attendance for a class week if she or he posts one (1) message, assignment submission or quiz/exam submission that is recorded by the system in the online classroom during the scheduled class week. Deadlines for attendance are based on Mountain Standard Time. Attendance is tracked automatically in all directed study courses.

FlexNet Class Attendance
FlexNet students are in attendance at a local campus workshop if they physically attend the local campus workshop meeting during the scheduled class hours and sign the attendance roster. A FlexNet student receives automatic attendance for an online class week if she or he posts one (1) message, assignment submission or quiz/exam submission that is recorded by the system in the online classroom on two (2) separate days during the online week. Deadlines for attendance are based on Mountain
Standard Time. Attendance is tracked automatically in all online weeks of FlexNet courses.

School of Advanced Studies Class Attendance
In order to be in attendance during a week, a student must post at least one (1) message, assignment submission or quiz/exam submission that is recorded by the system in the online classroom on two (2) separate days during the online week. Deadlines for attendance are based on Mountain Standard
Time. Dissertation courses (i.e., DOC 722, DOC 733, etc.) only require one (1) message, assignment submission or quiz/exam submission that is recorded in the online classroom during each workshop week to remain in attendance. Residency courses require daily sign-in on the attendance roster to verify attendance.

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Unexcused Absence Policy
Attendance is mandatory in all University courses; however, circumstances do occasionally arise which prevent a student from attending class. The University’s unexcused absence policy allows unexcused absence(s) to be granted based on the number of workshops within a course (refer to the chart below). An unexcused absence may affect the final course grade due to the missed opportunity to earn participation points. Unexcused absences will result in a Withdrawal (W) or Withdrawal/Failing
(WF) grade if students miss more than the maximum allowed absences.
Absences resulting in
Withdrawal (W) grade

Number of workshops

Allowed absences

1–4

0

1

5–9

1

2

9 (Online associates)

2

3

10–59

2

3

60+

9

10

Leave of Absence
Purpose
The University must have a written formal leave of absence (LOA) policy. The University and students must comply with the stated policy as well as governing regulations when requesting, approving and processing LOAs.

Policy
This policy is applicable to all students enrolled in degree programs at University of Phoenix.
If a student is not actively enrolled in a program, the student is not eligible to apply for a leave of absence.
Students may be approved by the University for multiple LOAs in a 12-month period. The total of all approved LOAs may not exceed 180 calendar days in the 12-month period. During an approved LOA, the student is not considered withdrawn and no Return to Title IV (R2T4) calculation is required for financial aid recipients.

Required Documentation
An LOA may be approved if the University determines there is a reasonable expectation the student will return. Students must follow the University’s LOA Policy when requesting an LOA, by providing (on or before the start date of the LOA) a written, signed and dated request, including the reason for the LOA, to the Finance Advisor. All requests will be forwarded to Student Financial Services – Operations (SFS-O).
If unforeseen circumstances prevent a student from providing a request to the campus on or before the start of the LOA, the University may grant the LOA if the campus has documented the reason and decision. The campus must collect the signed LOA request form from the student at a later date and provide it to SFS-O within a reasonable amount of time from the student’s last date of attendance.
Unforeseen circumstances may include, but are not limited to, medical and family emergencies, military, jury duty, business travel, University course cancellation and/or facility closure, and natural disasters.

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If a student is out of attendance due to an unforeseen circumstance and considered an unofficial withdrawal and the campus can document the reason and decision for the LOA prior to the Return of Title IV (R2T4) Calculation being performed, the student will be placed on an approved LOA and no calculation will be required. However, if the student is an unofficial withdrawal and the campus does not document the reason prior to the calculation being performed, the student will be considered an unofficial withdrawal.
An LOA will NOT be approved if a student requests the LOA after 14 consecutive days of nonattendance, is in an unofficial withdrawal (UW) status and the request is not due to unforeseen circumstances that occurred prior to the UW status.
If a student requests an LOA start date in the future and is officially withdrawn, unofficially withdrawn, or administratively withdrawn from the University prior to the start date of the LOA, the LOA is not valid and will be negated.

HEROES Act
The Higher Education Relief Opportunities for Students (HEROES) Act of 2003 was created to ensure students who are receiving federal financial aid are not adversely affected because of their military status, a natural disaster or a national emergency, and to minimize the administrative burden placed on such individuals. If an affected student has difficulty providing a written LOA request because of affected status, a verbal LOA request may be approved. Affected students include those who:
• Are serving on active duty during a war or other military operation, or national emergency
•  re performing qualifying National Guard duty during a war or other military operation,
A
or national emergency
•  eside or are employed in an area that is declared a disaster area by any federal, state or
R
local official in connection with a national emergency
The University will document the decision for granting an approved LOA to an affected student if that student has difficulty providing a written LOA request because of affected status. The documentation will include both the reason for the LOA and the reason for waiving the requirement that the LOA be requested in writing. For additional information, students should contact their Finance Advisor.

Length
In determining the length of the LOA, the LOA start date is the first day of the LOA, and the LOA end date is the day before the start date of the course the student is returning to at the University. The first day of the student’s initial LOA is used when determining the start date for the 12-month period.
If a student is granted an LOA due to unforeseen circumstances, the beginning date of the approved
LOA, as recorded by the student on the LOA form, is the date the student was unable to attend class because of the unforeseen circumstance.
The course start date will cease the LOA day count; however, the University’s academic system of record will use an active enrollment status effective date as determined by the date the student posts an academic related activity (ARA) in the course the student returns to at the University. NSLDS
Enrollment Reporting will use the standard effective date for an active enrollment (i.e., course start date). A new LOA request form will be required for any additional LOAs.
Note: At the time of the LOA approval, the University will review the LOA dates requested by the student and may adjust those dates based on ARAs, classes scheduled, etc.

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Extending an LOA
A student may request an LOA extension as long as the request is made before the scheduled end date. Students must follow the University LOA Policy when requesting the LOA extension, by providing on or before the scheduled end date, a written, signed, and dated request, including the reason for the LOA extension to the Finance Advisor. All requests must be forwarded to Student
Financial Services – Operations (SFS-O).

Institutionally Scheduled Breaks
If a student submits an LOA request with a start date being the same day as the start of an institutionally scheduled break or a start date that falls within an institutionally scheduled break, the University will update the LOA start date to the first day after the institutionally scheduled break ends.
If a student’s LOA is scheduled to end on or within an institutionally scheduled break, the University will update the LOA return date to the start date of the course that is scheduled to begin after the institutionally scheduled break, as long as the student is registered for a course set to begin when the institutionally scheduled break ends.
If a student’s LOA request completely overlaps an institutionally scheduled break, all days of the institutionally scheduled break and the LOA days will count toward the length of the LOA and apply toward the maximum of 180 days in a 12-month period. The University will not allow a student to take two consecutive LOAs separated by an institutionally scheduled break.

Disbursements During an LOA
The University may disburse Pell, IASG and FSEOG funds to a student on an LOA during certain times of the year. Federal financial aid funds that are part of a credit balance created before a student began an
LOA may be paid to a student, since those funds were disbursed before the student went on the LOA.

Completion of Coursework upon Return
If a student takes an approved LOA in the middle of a course, the University must ensure no additional charges are incurred when the student returns. To ensure no additional charges are incurred, the
University will issue the student an LOA Credit (LOAC). This LOAC will be applied to the course scheduled after the LOA end date.

Failure to Return
The University will advise the student, prior to granting the LOA, the effect that failure to return from an LOA may have on loan repayment terms, including the expiration of the student’s grace period. If a student does not return from an approved LOA, the withdrawal date and beginning of the grace period will be the student’s last date of attendance.
If the student reenters, after withdrawing from the University, the previously approved LOA days will count toward the student’s LOA maximum of 180 days in a 12-month period.

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Financial Aid Disbursements
Federal Funds
A student is eligible to receive the first disbursement of federal financial aid when the University confirms the student is enrolled in courses for the payment period and is eligible to receive the funds.
The student becomes eligible to receive a disbursement of federal financial aid for the second payment period when the student successfully completes one-half the weeks of instructional time and earns one-half the credit hours in the defined academic year (AY). Typically, the University disburses funds once the student successfully completes half the credits and weeks of instruction in the current AY, which may consist of more credit hours and weeks of instruction than the defined AY.
First-time, first-year undergraduate borrowers will not have the first installment of the Direct Loan disbursed until 30 calendar days after the program of study academic year begins.
First Disbursement Eligibility

Second Disbursement Eligibility

Federal Loans
Direct First-Time, First-Year Borrower

30 days after academic year or program start date

Direct Subsequent Borrower, Parent
PLUS, and Graduate/Professional PLUS

10 days from the academic year start date or 10 days from date of certification if the academic year start date is in the past

Successfully completes ½ weeks and credits in academic year or program and has posted attendance for the second payment period

Federal Grants
Pell Grant
Iraq Afghanistan Servicemembers
Grant (IASG)

10 days from the academic year start date or 10 days from date of certification if the academic year start date is in the past

Successfully completes ½ weeks and credits in academic year or program and has posted attendance for the second payment period

Federal Student Education
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

10 days from the academic year start date or 10 days from date of certification if the academic year start date is in the past

Teacher Education Assistance for
College and Higher Education
(TEACH ) Grant Program

10 days after the academic year start date or 10 days after date of certification if the academic year start date is in the past

State and Institutional Grants

Varies: Dependent on individual state requirements

Varies: Dependent on individual state requirements

Private Loans

Varies: Dependent on individual state requirements

Varies: Dependent on individual state requirements

Application of Funds
Federal financial aid and/or state assistance funds are retained at the time of disbursement to pay allowable academic year or payment period charges owed to the University. Allowable charges are defined as tuition (including independent study and state sales tax) and electronic course material.
Federal financial aid funds may only be used to pay for costs the student incurs for the period for which the federal financial aid funds are provided. However, the University may use current-year federal financial aid funds to satisfy prior award year allowable charges for a total of not more than $200.

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Financial Aid Authorization to Hold Funds
The University may obtain a student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan) written, voluntary authorization through the University’s financial aid application process to hold a federal financial aid credit balance.
The University does not require or coerce the authorization and notifies the student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan) that the authorization may be canceled at any time. If the student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan) chooses to cancel the authorization, the cancellation is not retroactive.
Funds held for incurred allowable charges and prior year charges prior to the University receiving the authorization cancellation will remain on account.
At any time, the University will accept a signed statement from a student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan), canceling or modifying the authorization initially provided. The Financial Aid
Authorization form is available to students on the University’s financial aid web (FAW) site.
The University will accept an authorization provided by the student (or parent in the case of a
PLUS Loan) orally, rather than in writing if the student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan) has been affected by a federally declared natural disaster and is prevented from providing a written authorization based on status.
If a student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan) cancels an authorization to apply a federal financial aid credit balance, the funds will be paid directly to the student (or parent in the case of a PLUS
Loan, or student if authorized by the parent) as soon as possible, but no later than 14 days after the
University receives the notice.
The University automatically holds funds for invoiced allowable charges for the current payment period as well as Direct Loan funds for any prior loan period charges for tuition, electronic course material fees and directed study for a total not to exceed $200. If both the first and second disbursements are received simultaneously, allowable charges may be withheld for both payment periods provided those charges have been charged to the student account.

Application of Funds
The University applies funds received from a federal financial aid disbursement in the following order:
1.  nvoiced and unpaid allowable charges for the current payment period or prior payment period
I
of the loan period;
2.  f authorization has been obtained from the student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan),
I
future allowable charges in the payment period of the applicable loan period; and
3. Direct Loan funds to any unpaid allowable charges for a prior loan period, not to exceed $200.
Note: There may be instances where a disbursement of Direct Loan funds is received and there are no current invoiced or future allowable charges on the student’s account. In these instances, the
University first applies the Direct Loan funds to any unpaid allowable charges for a prior loan period, not to exceed $200.
Any remaining credit balance funds are disbursed to the student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan, or student if authorized by the parent) no later than 14 days after the date the balance occurred on the student’s account.
Notwithstanding any authorization, the University pays any remaining balance on loan funds to the student (or parent in the case of a PLUS Loan, or student if authorized by the parent) by the end of the loan period (Refer to the Federal Financial Aid Credit Balance Policy for additional information).

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Disbursement for Books and Supplies
Pell-eligible students may use Pell funds to purchase books if those funds could have been disbursed 10 days prior to the beginning of the payment period and disbursed funds would create a federal financial aid credit balance. These students are notified of the University’s book voucher request process. If a student requests a book voucher, the student will be provided with the lesser of the amount of the credit balance or the amount needed for the books and supplies, as determined by the University.
These funds will be issued to the student no later than the seventh day of the payment period.
Students may opt out of this offer by not requesting the book voucher.

Cancellation of Federal Financial Aid
The student (or parent in the case of a Parent PLUS Loan) must inform the University if all or a portion of federal financial aid funds are to be canceled. Once the loan is disbursed, the University sends the student/parent a Right to Cancel letter, which includes the time given to respond should the student and/or parent borrower wish to cancel their loan request(s). This notification is mailed after the loan disbursement has been credited to the student’s account. Borrowers who wish to cancel all or a portion of their loan must inform the University within 30 days from the date the University sends the disbursement notification. Any requests received after the 30 days but prior to 110 days will be honored as a partial cancellation based on Title IV funds that are currently unapplied. The University notifies the student/parent in writing of the outcome of his or her request regardless of when the cancellation request is received.

State Funds
A payment period is defined according to individual state requirements. The payment period determines when funds are disbursed and the exact amount to be disbursed.

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Federal Financial Aid Counseling
Federal Direct Loan Entrance Counseling
The University ensures loan entrance counseling is conducted using an online counseling module for students borrowing Federal Subsidized/Unsubsidized Loans or PLUS Loans for the first time. A link to the iGrad entrance counseling module is displayed within the online financial aid application process for student borrowers. Entrance counseling generally includes the following:









An explanation of the use of a Master Promissory Note (MPN)
Importance of repayment obligation
Description of consequences of default
Sample repayment schedules
Information in reference to a borrower’s rights and responsibilities
Information on the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS), http://www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds_SA/
Information on possible loss of eligibility for additional Direct Subsidized Loans
I
 nformation on how a borrower’s maximum eligibility period, remaining eligibility period and subsidized usage period are determined
•  he potential for a borrower becoming responsible for all accruing interest on Direct Subsidized
T
Loans during in-school periods, grace periods and periods of authorized determent
• Impact of borrower responsibility for accruing interest on the borrower’s total debt
• Other terms and conditions
The goal of entrance counseling is to help the borrower understand what it means to borrow federal student loans.

Federal Direct Loan Exit Counseling
The University notifies students to complete loan exit counseling online at the U.S. Department of Education website (https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.action) within 30 days of completion of a program, withdrawal from the University or when a student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. Exit counseling generally includes the following:









An explanation of the use of a Master Promissory Note (MPN)
Importance of repayment obligation
Description of consequences of default
Sample repayment schedules
Information in reference to a borrower’s rights and responsibilities
Information on the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS), http://www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds_SA/
Information on possible loss of eligibility for additional Direct Subsidized Loans
I
 nformation on how a borrower’s maximum eligibility period, remaining eligibility period, and subsidized usage period are determined
•  he potential for a borrower becoming responsible for all accruing interest on Direct Subsidized
T
Loans during in-school periods, grace periods and periods of authorized determent
• Impact of borrower responsibility for accruing interest on the borrower’s total debt
• Other terms and conditions
A letter is sent to students advising them of the exit counseling requirement. This letter includes an attachment with all required exit information. The attachment can be found at http://www.direct.ed.gov/pubs/exitcounselguide.pdf Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Federal Perkins Loan Counseling
Perkins Loans exit counseling is conducted online at the Mapping Your Future Online Counseling website at http://mappingyourfuture.org/oslc/. Perkins Loan counseling generally includes the following:







Importance of repayment obligation
Explanation of repayment terms
Consequences of delinquency and default
Sample repayment schedules
Information in reference to a borrower’s rights and responsibilities
Other terms and conditions

Federal Teacher Education Assistance for College and
Higher Education Grant Counseling
The University ensures initial and subsequent Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher
Education (TEACH) Grant counseling is conducted online at http://www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds_SA/
Within 30 days of learning a TEACH Grant recipient is no longer in attendance, a letter is sent to the recipient advising him or her of the exit counseling requirement. This letter includes an attachment that can be found at https://teach-ats.ed.gov/ats/images/gen/teachExitCounselingGuide.pdf

Federal Loan Repayment
Prior Federal Student Loan Deferments (Postponing Payments)
A student who is registered and attending classes at the University can postpone making payments on federal student loans from previous colleges by requesting a deferment from the loan holder or servicer.
Return all deferment forms to a Finance Advisor, who forwards the forms to the Registrar’s Office for processing. The loan holder or servicer makes the final determination to grant a deferment request.
Students receiving federal student loans may also obtain deferments for several reasons including serving in the Peace Corps, under the Domestic Volunteer Service Act and as a volunteer for a taxexempt organization of demonstrated effectiveness in the field of community service.
Receiving a deferment is not automatic; therefore, the student or parent(s) must apply for it.
Borrowers must formally request a deferment through the procedures established by the holder of their loan(s). Detailed information regarding deferments may be viewed at http://www2.ed.gov/ offices/OSFAP/DirectLoan/postpone.html Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Loan Payment Calculator
Loan payment calculators may be used by students or potential students to calculate monthly payments under the different student loan repayment plans available. The Repayment Estimator at https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/mobile/repayment/repaymentEstimator.action allows students to estimate their payment under all available repayment plans.
Sample Standard Repayment Calculator Detail
Loan Amount

$12,000

Interest Rate

6.80%

Repayment Summary
Months in Repayment
Monthly Payment

120
$138

Total Interest Payment

$4,572

Total Loan Payment

$16,572

With the standard plan, a fixed payment amount is due each month until loans are paid in full.
Monthly repayments will be at least $50, and have up to 10 years to repay.
Graduated Repayment Detail — 120 months starting at a payment of $80 and a final monthly payment amount of $239. Total interest paid would be $5,832, for a total of $17,832.
Extended Repayment — Only available for loan amounts greater than $30,000
Payment amounts under the Pay As You Earn, Income-Based and Income-Contingent repayment plans will be available in the Repayment Estimator after you enter tax filing status, adjusted gross income, family size and state of residence.

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Federal Student Loan Consolidation
A Direct Loan consolidation allows a borrower to combine multiple federal student loans into one, which results in one bill, and one lender. It can also lower monthly payments by giving borrowers up to 30 years to repay their loans; however, by increasing the length of the repayment period, you will also make more payments, and pay more in interest. Most federal student loans, including the following, are eligible for consolidation:












Direct Subsidized Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Loans
Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans
Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans
Direct PLUS Loans
PLUS Loans from the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program
Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS)
Federal Perkins Loans
Federal Nursing Loans
Health Education Assistance Loans
Some existing consolidation loans
When considering consolidation, it is important to consider the pros and cons. Consolidation could give borrowers access to alternative repayment plans, which they did not have before, and enable them to switch from a variable interest rate loan to a fixed interest rate. Consolidation may also cause borrowers to lose benefits offered with the original loans such as interest rate discounts, principal rebates, or some loan cancellation benefits, which can significantly reduce the cost of repaying loans.
More information regarding loan consolidation is located at http://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/ consolidation Federal Student Loan Forgiveness, Cancellation and Discharge
In certain situations, borrowers can have their federal student loans forgiven, canceled or discharged.
Below is a list of the type of forgiveness, cancellation and discharges available.










Total and Permanent Disability Discharge
Death Discharge
Discharge in Bankruptcy (in rare cases)
Closed School Discharge
False Certification of Student Eligibility or Unauthorized Payment Discharge
Unpaid Refund Discharge
Teacher Loan Forgiveness
Public Service Loan Forgiveness
Perkins Loan Cancellation and Discharge (includes Teacher Cancellation)
Detailed information on these options is available at http://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/ forgiveness-cancellation Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Veterans Educational Benefits
Students who are entitled to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) education benefits must make initial contact with a campus veterans affairs certifying official. A formal application for admission to the
University should be completed before applying for DVA education benefits. Applications for veteran education benefits should be sent to a local campus-certifying official for submission to the DVA.
Each University of Phoenix program segregated by instructional modality (classroom-based or distance education) requires separate State Approving Agency (SAA) approval for the training of veterans or eligible persons. A student should contact a local campus for information on current approvals.
DVA education benefit eligibility and payment rates vary depending on each individual’s military history and the educational program being pursued. Only the DVA can determine eligibility of DVA education applications. For information, a student should contact a DVA representative at 888.
GI.BILL.1 (888.442.4551) or review http://www.gibill.va.gov
Students may need to withdraw from the University and should provide official notification of their intent to withdraw. Withdrawing may impact DVA education benefits for the current course as well as the availability of DVA educational benefits in future courses. Please contact your Academic Advisor to verify program eligibility.
Students receiving Chapter 30, 32, 33, 35, 1606 and 1607 benefits while attending University of Phoenix
North Carolina campuses are required to submit a copy of high school transcripts if they are transferring fewer than 24 credits to University of Phoenix from a previously attended postsecondary institution.
Directed study courses have Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DSST-DANTES) approval for tuition reimbursement. For more information on this program, a student should contact the Educational Service Officer on the military base.
University of Phoenix does not participate in the DVA education advanced payment program.
More information about veterans’ benefits can be reviewed at http://www.phoenix.edu/colleges_ divisions/military.html Visit the Department of Veterans Affairs website, http://www.gibill.va.gov, for additional information on educational entitlements.
On April 27, 2012, the President of the United States signed Executive Order 13607, Establishing
Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members, Veterans/Spouses, and Other Family Members. This executive order addresses key areas relating to federal military and veterans educational benefits programs. Military or affiliated students may qualify for federal assistance or student loans under federal financial aid programs (Title IV). Additional information for military tuition benefits can be viewed at: http://www.phoenix.edu/colleges_divisions/military/ military-financial-options.html Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Credit for Prior Education and Training
Credit for prior education or training must be evaluated and reported to the U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs (DVA) prior to the start of week 25 of enrollment. The DVA may not always pay DVA education benefits after week 24 if the DVA records indicate the student has a large amount of transfer credits.
Please ensure all prior education transcripts and Joint Services Transcripts (JST) (Army, Navy, Marine),
Coast Guard Institute transcripts, or DD-295 and DD-214 forms are submitted for evaluation in a timely manner. The student is responsible for ensuring all transcripts are submitted to the University.
Academic credits earned for courses appearing on an official transcript from a regionally accredited or candidate-for-accreditation college or university will be evaluated according to University policies, and accepted subject to the approval of the University Office of Admissions and Evaluation.
Transfer credits based on a different unit of credit than the one prescribed by University of Phoenix are subject to conversion before being transferred. Only the official transcript and course evaluations performed by the University Office of Admissions and Evaluation or Prior Learning Assessment Center are final. Any preliminary reviews by campus personnel are unofficial, not binding and subject to change.

Military Tuition Assistance
To obtain federal military tuition assistance, visit your education or Navy College Office to receive college counseling and develop an education plan. From that point, a student can submit a military tuition assistance request; for more information, visit http://www.phoenix.edu/colleges_divisions/ military/military-financial-options/tuition-assistance.html A student can currently receive 100% of federal tuition assistance from military service, with a $250 cap per semester hour, and a $4,500 annual limit. If a student wants to apply for military tuition assistance, that student will need to submit a completed authorization form to a Military Advisor at least two weeks before a course start date.

DVA Tuition Assistance Top-Up Benefit
Active-duty students who request to use the Tuition Assistance Top-Up (TATU) benefit program should direct all questions or concerns to the DVA at 1.888.GI.BILL.1 (1.888.442.4551) or online at http://www.gibill.va.gov/ For more information about VA Tuition Assistance and financial options, go to http://www.phoenix. edu/colleges_divisions/military/military-financial-options/tuition-assistance.html Consumer Information Guide 2015–2016 | AUGUST 2015

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Readmission of Servicemembers
Any student whose absence from the University is necessitated by reason of service in the uniformed services is entitled to readmission if the following criteria are met:
•  he student (or an appropriate officer of the Armed Forces or official of the Department of Defense)
T
gives verbal or written notice to the University’s Military Division verifying that the student’s absence from the University was necessitated by service in the uniformed services.
•  he cumulative length of the absence and of all previous absences from the University by reason of
T
service in the uniformed services does not exceed five years.
Note: A student who submits an application for readmission to the University must provide documentation to establish that the student has not exceeded the specified service limitations and that the student’s eligibility for readmission has not been terminated. Examples of documentation to verify that the student is still within the acceptable service limitations include the student’s deployment paperwork or a letter from the commanding officer that includes the student’s dates of service.
Exception: The University may not delay or attempt to avoid readmission of a student under this section by demanding documentation that does not exist, or is not readily available, at the time of readmission.
• The student submits verbal or written notification of intent to re-enroll.
Note: If the student’s last date of attendance with the University is more than 365 days in the past, the student must complete an updated admissions application and Enrollment Agreement in accordance with the University re-entry policy. The Military Division should then submit these completed documents along with the servicemember’s readmission form. The student may remain in the original program/version without appeal, provided the cumulative length of absence does not exceed five years and that the program has not been expired.
A student’s eligibility for readmission under this section by reason of such student’s service in the armed services terminates upon the occurrence of any of the following events:
•  separation of such person from the Armed Forces (including the National Guard and Reserves)
A
with a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge, or
•  dismissal of such person permitted under section 1161(a) of Title 10, USC, or
A
•  dropping of such person from the roles pursuant to section 1161(b) of Title 10, USC
A
Note: If the student does not submit a notification of intent to re-enroll within the time limits, the student is subject to the University-established leave of absence policy and general practices.

Re-entry Policy for Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC)
Students out for a period of more than one year, with current, active or prior military experience in the Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps and Navy are covered under the Servicemembers Opportunity
Colleges (SOC) guidelines, and therefore will be permitted to continue in their original program/ version of study. These students are required to complete all degree requirements within the graduation deadline period. Students are granted five (5) years to complete an associate degree and seven (7) years to complete an undergraduate degree from the first date of positive attendance with the University. If the student is unable to complete his or her degree requirements within the deadline, the University is not obligated to uphold the agreement of the SOC Degree Network.
Note: A student with a SOC agreement who changes program, major or concentration is required to update to the most current program/version offered in his or her state or jurisdiction. A new SOC agreement will be created for the student when the student is admitted to the new program/version, and the student will be given a new five (5) year (associate) or seven (7) year (undergraduate) timeframe in which to complete the degree.

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Student Financial Responsibilities,
Policies and Options
Student Financial Responsibilities
The student is responsible to ensure all tuition and electronic course materials fees are paid whether in attendance or not. The student is responsible for knowing the account balance. Student account information is available on the student website.
When the student is considered administratively, officially or unofficially withdrawn from his or her program, the University may cancel any federal financial aid in process. The student may receive a refund for or may owe payment to the University depending upon the student’s account balance.

Changing Finance Plans
The student can change a finance plan if in compliance with the current finance plan. To change a finance plan, the student must contact a Finance Advisor and complete all necessary documents.
All changes must be approved by University of Phoenix to become effective.

Meeting Financial Plan Obligations
Students who primarily attend a physical University of Phoenix campus are subject to finance approval by their primary campus prior to enrolling in a course. Tuition and all applicable fees for each course must be paid according to the terms and conditions outlined in the primary financial option selected on the Student Financial Agreement form. Students who do not comply with the primary financial option term will not be allowed to attend classes. Students are required to be in compliance with University financial policies before grades and transcripts will be issued or the degree awarded.
A student may be administratively withdrawn for failure to make payment in a timely manner, preventing the student from attending future class sessions, until the amount owed is paid in full or satisfactory payment arrangements are made. All costs of collection, court costs and reasonable attorneys’ fees will be added to delinquent accounts collected through third parties. University of
Phoenix may obtain a current credit report as needed to support decisions to defer tuition payment or to assist in the collection of amounts owed.

Electronic Course Materials and Books Fees
Electronic course materials and books for each course must be paid at the time they are ordered or in accordance with a student’s stated payment option. Electronic course materials fees are nonrefundable, unless prohibited by law. The student who drops a course will be granted access to the electronic course materials for that course without additional charge if the course is retaken within 180 days of the course’s original start date.

State Tax
Various states require universities to collect a tax on tuition, fees, digital goods or access to digital information. The University will collect the appropriate tax on tuition, fees and electronic course materials fees charged to the student in these states. Contact a Finance Advisor for the current list of states requiring tax be collected.

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Financial Policies
Multiple-Tuition Discount Policy
For instances in which a student may qualify for multiple tuition discounts, the discount that provides the greatest benefit to the student will be applied to the tuition amount.

General Refund Policy
A tuition refund may be granted to those who qualify, based on the state refund policy. A complete list of state refund policies is located in the Academic Catalog and the Consumer Information Guide.
All other fees are nonrefundable, unless prohibited by law.

Payment Policies
Payments are accepted on the student website (https://ecampus.phoenix.edu/portal/portal/public/ login.aspx) by check, credit card or debit card. Finance Advisors can also process credit card or debit card payments. The student can mail a check, certified check or money order payment to the following address:
Apollo Education Group/Corporate Processing
P.O. Box 29887
Phoenix, AZ 85038-9887
If a credit card or a debit card is provided with a completed Authorization to Charge form, tuition and electronic course materials fees will be charged to that card. Automatic payments are set prior to each course upon request.
The University is not responsible for fees or penalties incurred as a result of payment with a debit card or other restrictive payment cards. The student should contact his or her financial institution for account balances, daily transaction limits and other restrictions.

Returned Check Fees
Returned checks will result in an additional processing fee of $25, unless prohibited by law.

Late Payment Fees
Payments must be made in accordance to the selected finance plan. If tuition payment is not received within the terms and conditions of the selected finance plan, fees up to $25 will be assessed to the student account, unless otherwise restricted by law. Late fees are due immediately upon invoice.

Notice
The University may report information about student accounts to credit bureaus. Late payments, missed payments or other defaults on student accounts may be reflected in a credit report.
If payment for tuition and electronic course materials fees is not received in accordance with the Student
Finance Agreement, the student may be withdrawn from the program and official transcripts withheld.

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Financial Options
Understanding and choosing the right finance plan is critical to the successful completion of the student’s selected program. University of Phoenix offers a number of finance plan options to assist the student in managing financial obligations. The student can utilize one or more of the plans listed below, depending on personal circumstances. For more detailed information regarding actual tuition fees for programs and locations, visit the tuition and fees calculator web page at http://www.phoenix. edu/tuition_and_financial_options/tuition_and_fees.html or contact a Finance Advisor with any questions regarding financial options and scholarships.

Cash Plan
The Cash Plan requires all tuition and electronic course materials fees to be paid in full prior to the start of each course. For more information, please visit http://www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_ financial_options/financial_options/cash-plan.html Federal Financial Aid Plan
The Federal Financial Aid Plan is available to students receiving federal grants, federal loans or both to pay for tuition in an eligible degree or a certificate program. To learn more, please visit http://www. phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/financial_options/federal_financial_aid.html Military or Government Billing Plan
Under the Military or Government Billing Plan, University of Phoenix directly bills the military or other government agency for a student’s tuition. For more information, please visit http://www.phoenix. edu/colleges_divisions/military/military-financial-options.html Third-Party Billing Plan
Under the Third-Party Billing Plan, University of Phoenix directly bills an approved employer for a student’s tuition. To learn more, please visit http://www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/ financial_options/third_party_billing.html Tuition Deferral Plan
The Tuition Deferral Plan is available for students whose employers offer to repay some or all of their employees’ tuition. The plan is also available to students receiving benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or U.S. Department of Defense. For more information, please visit http://www. phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/financial_options/tuition-deferral-plan.html Tribal Funding
Several American Indian tribal nations provide funding for the tuition of a student who is a recognized member. For more information, please contact tribalrelations2@phoenix.edu

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Withdrawing from the University
Circumstances may necessitate withdrawal from the University. A student who received, or is eligible to receive federal financial aid funds provided certain criteria are met, and subsequently officially or unofficially withdraws is subject to a Return of Title IV (R2T4) Calculation as required by federal regulations.

Official Withdrawals
There are two ways a student can provide official notification of the intent to withdraw from the
University to be considered an official withdrawal:
1.  omplete the self-service Official Withdrawal automated process via the University student website
C
at https://ecampus.phoenix.edu/portal/portal/public/login.aspx, through the Program tab.
2.  otify the designated campus offices of Enrollment Services, Academic Services and Financial Services.
N

Withdrawal Date
The withdrawal date for an official withdrawal is the last date of academic attendance or attendance of an academically related activity (ARA) determined from University attendance records. This date is always earlier than or equal to the date the student notifies the University of his or her withdrawal.

Date of Determination
The date of determination (DOD) for students who officially withdraw from the University is the latter of the student’s withdrawal date or the date of notification. The University will return the amount of federal financial aid for which it is responsible no later than 45 days after the date the University determines the student has withdrawn. (See Return of Federal Financial Aid for additional information.)

Rescission of Official Withdrawal
Students who rescind their intent to withdraw must provide an electronic or written statement to the
University stating their intent to participate in ARAs and complete the payment period.
Students may rescind the intent to withdraw by completing the Official Withdrawal Rescind request via the University eCampus website. Rescissions may be requested up until the time a Return of Title
IV (R2T4) calculation has been completed. The student may also submit an electronic or written statement to the University stating his or her intent to return to the University, remain in academic attendance and continue to participate in ARAs through the end of the payment period.
If the student subsequently withdraws after rescinding the intent to withdraw, the withdrawal date is the last date of academic attendance or academically related activity determined from University attendance records.
The DOD for students who rescind their intent to withdraw and subsequently withdraw from the
University, without official notification, is no greater than 15 days after the student’s official last date of academic attendance or attendance at an academically related activity.

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Unofficial Withdrawals
Students who do not provide official notification to the University of their intent to withdraw are considered unofficial withdrawals (UWs) after 14 days of consecutive nonattendance in an ARA.

Exceptions
The University allows the following exceptions when counting the 14 days of consecutive nonattendance in an ARA:
I Grades — If a student is granted an extension of the course he or she is currently attending and the intent is to complete the course, the days in the extension period will not count toward the 14 days of consecutive nonattendance in an ARA. During this time, a student in an extension period will remain in active status. An extension of the course is indicated by the issuance of an I (Incomplete), IP (In Process) or IX (In Progress Extension) grade.
Institutionally Scheduled Breaks — Students on institutionally scheduled breaks will not have the days of the break count toward the 14 days of consecutive nonattendance at an academically related activity. The following are different types of institutionally scheduled breaks at the University:
• Holidays
• Inclement Weather
• Administrative

Withdrawal Date
The withdrawal date for students who cease attendance at the University, including a student who does not return from an approved leave of absence, is the last date of academic attendance or attendance in an ARA determined from University attendance records.
In the case of a student who has received an approved leave of absence, the University will review the student record on or after the original approved return date. The University review determines if the student reentered as scheduled, or did not reenter as scheduled and must be withdrawn for the purposes of the Return of Title IV (R2T4) calculation and deferment processing.

Date of Determination
The DOD for students who unofficially withdraw from the University is no greater than 15 days after the official last date of attendance; or when a student fails to return from an approved leave of absence. Students granted an extension (I, IX, IP grades) have the period of the extension excluded when counting the 14 days of consecutive nonattendance. For example, if the student was out of attendance (OOA) for 5 days prior to the extension, once the extension is completed the days continue to count from day 6 until the next ARA posts. If the student does not post an ARA, then at
14 days (excluding the extension period) the DOD will populate. The University will return the amount of federal financial aid funds for which it is responsible no later than 45 days after the date the
University determines the student has withdrawn.

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Administrative Withdrawals
Students who are withdrawn from the University for failure to meet admission, academic, candidacy, financial or code of conduct policies are considered administrative withdrawals (AWs).

Withdrawal Date
The withdrawal date for students who are AW is the last date of academic attendance or attendance in an ARA that occurred prior to the decision to administratively withdraw the student.

Date of Determination
The DOD for students who are AW from the University is the date the University determines the withdrawal. The University will return the amount of federal financial aid for which it is responsible no later than 45 days after the date of the AW.

Academic Related Activities That Occur During an Institutionally
Scheduled Break
The University does not recognize any ARA that occurs during an institutionally scheduled break as attendance for federal financial aid purposes only.

Withdrawal Date
If a student posts an ARA during an institutionally scheduled break, the University will look for the most recent ARA that occurred prior to the start of the institutionally scheduled break. This date will be used as the withdrawal date for Title IV purposes.

Date of Determination
The DOD for students who post ARAs during an institutionally scheduled break will be no greater than
15 days after the end date of the institutionally scheduled break.
For example: A student attends class on December 19th. An institutionally scheduled break occurs
December 20 – January 4. The student posts an ARA on December 29th, which is during the scheduled break. The DOD is January 19th (the 15th day after the end date of the institutionally scheduled break).

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Return of Federal Financial Aid
A federal financial aid (Title IV) recipient who withdraws from the University is subject to a Return of
Title IV (R2T4) calculation. For the purpose of R2T4 calculation requirements, a recipient is a student who has actually received federal financial aid funds or has met the conditions that entitled the student to a late disbursement of federal financial aid funds. The University is required to review the amount of federal loan and grant aid a student received for the payment period, to determine what percentage of federal financial aid the student earned prior to withdrawal. The percentage of federal financial aid determined to be unearned for the payment period must be returned to the appropriate federal financial aid program(s).

Policy
When a federal financial aid recipient withdraws from the University prior to the end of a payment period, an R2T4 calculation must be performed to determine the amount of federal financial aid funds earned as of the date of withdrawal. If the total amount of federal financial aid funds earned is less than the amount of federal financial aid funds disbursed to the student or on behalf of the student in the case of a parent PLUS Loan, the difference between these amounts is returned to the applicable federal financial aid programs. If federal financial aid funds earned is greater than federal financial aid funds disbursed, the difference between these amounts is treated as a post withdrawal disbursement.
An R2T4 calculation is not performed if the federal financial aid recipient withdraws after successfully completing the payment period and all funds awarded for that period have been disbursed.

Return Calculation
The amount of federal financial aid earned is calculated by determining the percentage of aid earned and applying this percentage to the total amount of aid disbursed and that could have been disbursed for the payment period. The payment period is defined as the period of time it takes the student to complete at least one-half of the weeks and credits in the student’s academic year. For purposes of determining earned federal financial aid, a student’s aid is considered disbursed if it is disbursed as of the student’s last date of attendance. As long as conditions for a late disbursement (described below) are met prior to the date the student became ineligible (the student’s last date of attendance), any undisbursed federal financial aid will be counted as aid that could have been disbursed.

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Conditions for a Late Disbursement
(Including Post Withdrawal Disbursements)
•  he Department of Education (ED) processed a Student Aid Report (SAR) or Institutional Student
T
Information Record (ISIR) with an official Expected Family Contribution (EFC) for the student
(except in the case of a parent PLUS Loan)
• The University originated a Direct Loan (DL)
•  he University made the award to the student for a Federal Perkins Loan or Federal Supplemental
T
Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
• The University originated the award to the student for the TEACH Grant program
The University does not include as a post-withdrawal disbursement any funds the University was prohibited from disbursing on or before the date the student withdrew, which would apply to the following:
•  econd or subsequent disbursements of DL funds unless the student has graduated or successfully
S
completed the loan period.
•  econd disbursements of DL for the period that the University is prohibited from making until
S
the student successfully completes one-half of the weeks of instructional time and one-half the credit hours in the academic year.
• Disbursements of DL or Perkins Loan funds for which the borrower has not signed a promissory note.
•  isbursements of Federal Pell Grant, Iraq Afghanistan Service Grant and TEACH Grant funds
D
to a student for whom the University did not receive a valid SAR or a valid ISIR by the deadline date established by the Secretary in the Federal Register.
•  ederal Pell Grant, Iraq Afghanistan Service Grant and TEACH Grant funds for a subsequent
F
payment period when the student has not successfully completed the earlier payment period for which the student has already been paid.
•  isbursements of DL funds to a first-year, first-time borrower who withdraws before the 30th
D
day of the student’s program of study.

Inadvertent Overpayments
An inadvertent overpayment occurs when the University disburses funds to a student no longer in attendance but prior to the date the University determines the student withdrew from the program.
This would include any federal financial aid fund disbursements made after the student’s last date of attendance but prior to the University’s determination that the student was withdrawn. These inadvertent overpayments are included in the R2T4 calculation as aid that could have been disbursed.
Only students who meet late disbursement criteria are entitled to keep federal financial aid funds disbursed as an inadvertent overpayment. If an inadvertent overpayment cannot be made as a late disbursement, the University returns the entire amount of the federal financial aid funds disbursed.
If the inadvertent overpayment can be made as a late disbursement, the University returns only the unearned portion of the inadvertent overpayment within 45 days of the University’s date of determination that the student withdrew. Unearned inadvertent overpayments are returned according to the requirements for the return of unearned funds.

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Verification and the Return Calculation
If a student provides required verification documents after withdrawing from the University, but within 30 days of the date of the notification informing the student of the requirements, and in time for the University to meet the 30-day Return deadline, the University performs the R2T4 calculation based on all federal financial aid the student had established eligibility for prior to the withdrawal.
For the Federal Pell Grant Program, if the student provides the verification documents after the 30-day deadline but before the earlier of 120 days after the student’s last date of attendance or the deadline established by ED each award year, the University reviews and addresses eligibility as required.
If a student does not provide all verification documents in time for the University to complete verification and meet the R2T4 deadlines, the University includes in the R2T4 calculation only the federal financial aid that was not subject to verification (unsubsidized and PLUS Loan funds) and for which the conditions of a late disbursement were met prior to the withdrawal.

Institutionally Scheduled Breaks
Institutionally scheduled breaks of five or more consecutive days are excluded from the R2T4 calculation.
This includes all holiday, inclement weather and administrative breaks of five or more consecutive days.

When Funds Are Disbursed Using Different Payment Periods
When the University disburses different types of aid using different payment periods, e.g., one payment period for disbursing grant funds and another payment period for disbursing DL, only one payment period is used in determining earned funds. The payment period ending later is used for the R2T4 calculation.

Percentage of Federal Financial Aid Earned
The calculation of Percentage of Federal Financial Aid Earned includes all financial aid disbursed or that could have been disbursed to a student. This percentage is equal to the percentage of the payment period completed by the student as of the student’s last date of attendance in the payment period. This percentage is determined using the University’s rate of progression calculation.
If the student withdraws after successfully completing the payment period, 100% of the federal financial aid funds are earned and no calculation is required. If the withdraw date occurs after the student completes more than 60% of the payment period, the student earns 100% of the federal financial aid funds.

Rate of Progression Calculation
The percentage of the period completed is calculated as follows:
Number of calendar days completed in the payment period
Total number of calendar days in the payment period

Total Calendar Days Completed in the Payment Period
The total number of calendar days completed in the payment period (numerator) is the count of calendar days from the payment period start date to the student’s last date of attendance.

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Required Adjustments to Calendar Days Completed in the Payment Period
Calendar days are removed from calendar days completed in the payment period if any of the following occurred between the payment period start date and the student’s last date of attendance:
• Institutionally scheduled breaks of five (5) consecutive calendar days or more
–– Holidays
–– Inclement weather
–– Administrative
• Student scheduled or selected breaks of five (5) consecutive calendar days or more between courses
• All approved Leave of Absence calendar days
• Unapproved breaks of less than 180 days

Total Calendar Days in the Payment Period
The total number of calendar days in a payment period (denominator) is determined based upon the number and type (credential level and modality) of credits awarded in the payment period.

Required Adjustments to Calendar Days in the Payment Period
Additional calendar days will be added to the payment period for unsuccessful course(s) completions with grades of I, IX, IP, QC, F or W that occurred in a course prior to the course the student’s last date of attendance occurs within.
If the payment period needs to be extended, it is extended by a defined number of days based upon the following credential levels and modalities:
• Associate Program (9-week courses) — 63 days if one or two courses are needed,
126 days if three or four courses are needed
• Associate Program (5-week courses online) — 35 days if one course is needed,
70 days if two courses are needed, 105 days if three courses are needed, etc.
• Associate Program (5-week courses ground) — 29 days if one course is needed,
58 days if two courses are needed, 87 days if three courses are needed, etc.
• Bachelor’s Program Online — 35 days if one course is needed, 70 days if two courses are needed, 105 days if three courses are needed, etc.
• Bachelor’s Program Ground — 29 days if one course is needed, 58 days if two courses are needed, 87 days if three courses are needed, etc.
• Master’s/Doctoral Program Online — 42 days if one course is needed, 84 days if two courses are needed, 126 days if three courses are needed, etc.
• Master’s/Doctoral Program Ground — 36 days if one course is needed, 72 days if two courses are needed, etc.
Note: Additional calendar days are NOT added for the course(s) in which the student’s official last date of attendance falls within. This includes any course(s) the student was enrolled in, but did not complete at the time of withdrawal.
Calendar days are removed from the calendar days in the payment period if any of the following occurred or is scheduled to occur from the payment period start date to the payment period end date:





Institutionally scheduled holiday breaks of five (5) consecutive calendar days or more
Student scheduled of selected breaks of five (5) consecutive calendar days or more between courses
All approved Leave of Absence calendar days
Periods of non-enrollment of five (5) consecutive calendar days or more due to administrative and inclement weather closures
• Unapproved breaks of less than 180 days

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Rate of Progression Examples
The following examples illustrate the rate of progression calculation outlined above. The figures provided are examples only; actual amounts may vary for each student.

Bachelor’s Program Online
Last date of attendance is 07/15/20XX. Payment Period is 06/07/20XX to 10/24/20XX.
Course Schedule
Course ID

Credits

Start Date

End Date

Instructor

Grade

Course #1

3.0

06/07/20XX

07/11/20XX

SMITH

W

Course #2

3.0

07/12/20XX

08/15/20XX

JONES

Course #3

3.0

08/16/20XX

09/19/20XX

JOHNSON

Course #4

3.0

09/20/20XX

10/24/20XX

BROWN

Rate of Progression Calculation
39 (Number of calendar days completed in the payment period)
175 (Total number of calendar days in the payment period)

The percentage of the payment period completed = 22.28%

Days Completed

Total Days

Percentage of
Payment Period
Completed

39

175

22.28%

Federal Financial Aid
Disbursed for the
Payment Period

Disbursed Financial
Aid Earned*

$12,500

$2,785

* Estimate for illustrative purposes only

Title IV Credit Balance and the Return Calculation
A Title IV credit balance created during the period is not released to the student nor returned to federal financial aid programs prior to performing the R2T4 calculation. The University holds these funds even if, under the 14-day credit balance payment requirements, funds are otherwise required to be released.
In the R2T4 calculation, the University includes any federal financial aid credit balance as disbursed aid. Although not included in the R2T4 calculation, any federal financial aid credit balance from a prior payment period in the academic year that remains on a student’s account when the student withdraws is included as federal financial aid funds for purposes of determining the amount of any final federal financial aid credit balance when a student withdraws. Upon application of any applicable refund policies, a federal financial aid credit balance is allocated first to repay grant overpayments owed by the student as result of the current withdrawal.
Within 14 days of the date that the University performs the R2T4 calculation, the University pays any remaining federal financial aid credit balance in one or more of the following ways:
• Pay authorized charges at the University
• To the student (or parent for a PLUS loan)
The University applies its own refund policy before allocating a federal financial aid credit balance.
However, the University does not actually complete the refund process before completing the steps for allocating the federal financial aid credit balance.
If the University is unable to locate the student (or parent) when attempting to pay a credit balance, it returns the funds to federal financial aid programs.

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Return of Unearned Aid
In the R2T4 calculation, the total Amount Disbursed plus Amount that Could Have Been Disbursed to the student or on the student’s behalf, minus the Amount of Federal Financial Aid Earned by the
Student determines the amount of federal financial aid funds unearned and required to be returned to the funding source.
When a return of federal financial aid is required, the University and the student may both need to return funds. The University returns the lesser of the following amount to the appropriate federal financial aid program(s):
• The total amount of unearned aid; or
• The amount equal to the total University charges incurred by the student for the payment period multiplied by the percentage of unearned aid.
University (institutional) charges incurred by the student include tuition, fees, books and directed study (including state sales tax) initially assessed the student for the entire payment period. Initial charges are only adjusted for changes the University makes prior to the student’s withdrawal. The amounts of institutional charges included in the R2T4 calculation are those charged or anticipated to be charged to the student’s account. Although institutional charges may not have actually been charged due to the student’s withdrawal, the University uses the actual charges to date, to include full tuition, fees, books and directed study (including sales tax) for each course in the payment period, and estimate remaining charges based on the students’ primary campus. Institutional charges include all invoiced and scheduled charges, as well as any adjustments made to correct these charges, that occur prior to the beginning of the course from which the student withdrew.
Tuition waivers for military students and Campus Footprint initiative are not counted as Estimated
Financial Aid (EFA) and will be subtracted from institutional charges in the R2T4 calculation.
If after the student withdraws, the University changes the amount of institutional charges it assessed, or decides to eliminate all institutional charges, those changes do not impact the charges or aid earned in the calculation.
The University returns federal financial aid funds to programs in the following order up to the net amount disbursed from each:










Unsubsidized FFEL/Direct Unsubsidized Loan
Subsidized FFEL/Direct Subsidized Loan
Federal Perkins Loans
Federal Direct PLUS (Graduate Student)
Federal Direct PLUS (Parent of Dependent Student)
Federal Pell Grants
FSEOG
TEACH Grants
Iraq & Afghanistan Service Grant (IASG)
After the University allocates its portion of unearned funds, the student must return federal financial aid owed in the same order specified above for the University. The amount of federal financial aid the student is responsible for returning is calculated by subtracting the amount returned by the
University from the total amount of unearned federal financial aid funds to be returned.

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The student (or parent in the case of funds due to a parent PLUS Loan) must return or repay, as appropriate, the calculated amount to any federal financial aid loan program in accordance with the terms of the loan; and any federal financial aid grant program as an overpayment of the grant. The amount of a grant overpayment due from a student is limited to the amount by which the original grant overpayment exceeds one-half of the total federal financial aid grant funds received by the student.
The University may round final repayment amounts, for which the University and student are responsible, to the nearest dollar.

Timelines for Return of Funds
The University completes a student’s R2T4 calculation within 30 days of the University’s date of determination. The University returns the amount of federal financial aid funds for which it is responsible as soon as possible but no later than 45 days after the date the University determines the student has withdrawn.

Deceased Student
If the University receives reliable information indicating an individual borrower or student for whom a parent received a PLUS Loan dies, the University suspends further awarding and disbursements. An original or certified copy of the death certificate or accurate and complete photocopy of the original or certified copy of the death certificate is requested and forwarded to the Secretary of Education
(Secretary). Under exceptional circumstances and on a case-by-case basis, the Secretary may approve a discharge based upon other reliable documentation supporting the discharge request.
Determination of Withdrawal of a Deceased Student

The withdrawal date for a deceased student is the last date of academic attendance or attendance at an ARA determined from University attendance records. The date of determination is the date the University becomes aware of the student’s death. (Refer to Withdrawing from the University for further information.)
Return of Title IV Funds for a Deceased Student

The amount of federal financial aid funds earned by the student is calculated according to the Return of
Title IV Funds (R2T4) calculation. If the calculation indicates the amount of funds earned is less than the amount disbursed to the student, or on behalf of the student in the case of a PLUS Loan, the difference between these amounts is returned to the appropriate federal financial aid programs. The University does not report grant overpayments for deceased students to NSLDS or refer a grant overpayment to
Debt Resolution Services, as the student’s estate is not required to return any federal financial aid funds.
The following represents procedures the University follows if a credit balance of federal financial aid funds, created from funds disbursed before the death of the student, exists after the completion of the R2T4 and the University’s refund calculations:
• Pay authorized charges owed to the University.
• Return any federal financial aid grant overpayments owed by the student for previous withdrawals from the University.
• Return any remaining credit balance to the federal financial aid programs.
If the University previously referred a grant overpayment to Debt Resolution Services, documentation will be forwarded by the University indicating the student is deceased. Based on this information and documentation, Debt Resolution Services will remove the overpayment from the student’s records.
Although the student may be eligible to receive a post withdrawal or late disbursement, the University is prohibited by federal financial aid Title IV regulations from further disbursements and will therefore not request additional funds from federal financial aid programs nor send out a post withdrawal letter.

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Tuition Refund Policy
Institutional
The following provisions pertain to all refund policies applied by the University unless specifically stated otherwise. When a student begins a program under Registered (R) status, pending the completion of the student admission file, and is subsequently denied admission, the student is eligible for a full tuition refund. The University does not refund tuition for any completed course. A tuition refund can be requested in writing from a local campus.
Students who withdraw from a course prior to the start date will receive a 100% refund for that course. Students who have completed 60% or less of the course are eligible for a pro-rata refund.
The pro-rata refund percentage will be calculated by dividing the number of weeks remaining by the total number of weeks in the course.*
Here are a few examples of common course lengths:
Weeks Attended

Refund for
5-Week Course

Refund for
6-Week Course

Refund for
7-Week Course

Refund for
9-Week Course

1 Week

80% Refund

83% Refund

86% Refund

89% Refund

2 Weeks

60% Refund

67% Refund

71% Refund

78% Refund

3 Weeks

40% Refund

50% Refund

57% Refund

67% Refund

4 Weeks

No Refund

No Refund

43% Refund

56% Refund

No Refund

44% Refund

5 Weeks
6 Weeks

No Refund

* Attendance for doctoral residency is submitted after the student has attended and completed all days in the residency.

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State
If a student attends a class in one of these states, the specific state refund policy will be applied in addition to the University Institutional Refund Policy. In the event that there is a conflict in the policies, the state policy will supersede the general University policy, unless the University policy is better for the student’s situation. These policies are outlined below.

Arizona
Students have the right to a full refund of all monies paid, including application and materials fees, if they withdraw within three business days after signing the Enrollment Agreement. Otherwise, students in Arizona will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund Policy.

California
Students in the state of California will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exception:
• Students have the right to cancel the Enrollment Agreement and obtain a refund of charges paid through attendance at the first class session or the seventh day after enrollment, whichever is later.
• To cancel enrollment, the student must submit a written request postmarked on or before the applicable time period to the campus director of finance at the appropriate address listed below:
Refund administrative address for students attending any of the five California campuses (Southern
California, San Diego, Bay Area, Central Valley and Sacramento Valley):
University of Phoenix
3090 Bristol St.
Costa Mesa, CA 92626-3099
Refund administrative address for California residents attending Online:
University of Phoenix
4035 S. Riverpoint Pkwy.
Phoenix, AZ 85040

Florida
Students in the state of Florida will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students have the right to a full refund of all monies paid, including application and materials fees, if they withdraw within three business days after signing the Enrollment Agreement.
• The University will retain $45 of the application fee for students who withdraw from the University prior to the start of their program and after the three-day cancellation period.
• Refunds will be paid within 30 days of a student’s official withdrawal.

Georgia
Students in Georgia will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students have the right to a full refund of all monies paid, including application and materials fees, if they withdraw within three business days after signing the Enrollment Agreement.
• Students providing written notification of withdrawal prior to the first class session or who have been out of attendance for more than 14 days will receive a full refund of tuition paid for the unattended course.
• Refunds are paid within 30 days of a student’s official withdrawal.
• A student who is out of attendance for more than 14 days is considered withdrawn from the course.

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Indiana
Indiana has established refund policies that differ from the University Institutional Refund Policy. If a student attends a class in Indiana, the state’s refund policy will be applied. The University must make the proper refund no later than 31 days after the request for cancellation or withdrawal.
A student is entitled to a full refund if one or more of the following criteria are met:
• The student cancels the Enrollment Agreement within six business days after signing.
• The student does not meet the University minimum admission requirements.
• The student’s enrollment was procured as a result of a misrepresentation in the written materials utilized by the University.
If the student has not visited the University prior to enrollment and, upon touring the University or attending the regularly scheduled orientation or classes, the student withdrew from the program within three days, he or she will not have a financial obligation.
A student withdrawing from an instructional program after starting the instructional program at the
University and attending one week or less is entitled to a refund of 90% of the cost of the financial obligation, less an application or enrollment fee of 10% of the total tuition, not to exceed $100.
A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after attending more than 25% but equal to or less than 50% of the duration of the instructional program, is entitled to a refund of 50% of the cost of the financial obligation, less an application or enrollment fee of 10% of the total tuition, not to exceed $100.
A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after attending more than 50% but equal to or less than 60% of the duration of the instructional program, is entitled to a refund of 40% of the cost of the financial obligation, less an application or enrollment fee of 10% of the total tuition, not to exceed $100.
A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after attending more than 60% of the duration of the instructional program, is not entitled to a refund.
Indiana Refund Policy Chart
Weeks Attended

Refund for 5-Week Course

Refund for 6-Week Course

Refund for 9-Week Course

1 Week

90% Refund

90% Refund

90% Refund

2 Weeks

50% Refund

50% Refund

75% Refund

3 Weeks

40% Refund

50% Refund

50% Refund

4 Weeks

No Refund

No Refund

50% Refund

No Refund

40% Refund

5 Weeks
6 Weeks

No Refund

Iowa
Students in the state of Iowa who withdraw from a course prior to the start date will receive a
100% refund of tuition for that course. Students who withdraw from a course after the start date will receive a pro-rata refund of tuition for the course until they have attended 100% of the course.
Refunds will be paid within 30 days of a student’s official withdrawal.

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Kansas or Missouri
Students in Kansas or Missouri will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students have the right to a full refund of all monies paid if they withdraw within three business days after signing the Enrollment Agreement.
• To cancel enrollment, a student must notify the local campus in writing on or before the three-day period. After the three-day period, all fees, including applications fees, assessment fees and book fees, are nonrefundable.
• A tuition refund must be requested in writing to the student’s local campus.

Kentucky
Students in the state of Kentucky will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exceptions:
• A student who cancels enrollment any time before the start of the first class session will receive a full refund of all monies paid.
• The University may retain 10% of the tuition agreed upon in the Enrollment Agreement or $100, whichever is less, for students who fail to attend in the enrollment period for which advanced payment was made.
• Refunds will be paid within 30 days of a student’s official withdrawal.
• A student who is out of attendance for more than 30 days is considered withdrawn.

Louisiana
Students in the state of Louisiana will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students who cancel enrollment any time before the start of the first class session will receive a full refund of all monies paid, except the application fee, which is nonrefundable.
• Refunds will be paid within 30 days of a student’s official withdrawal.
• The University may retain an administrative fee, not to exceed 15% of total tuition and fees paid.

Minnesota
Students in the state of Minnesota will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional
Refund Policy with the following exception:
• Refunds for state aid programs and non-state aid programs are calculated on a proportional basis using the state mandated or institutional refund policy.
•  o calculate the minimum refund due to the State Grant Program, the SELF Loan Program and other
T
aid programs (with the exception of the state Work Study Program), the Higher Education Services
Office Refund Calculation Worksheet of the Minnesota State Grant manual is used.

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Nevada
Students in the state of Nevada will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students who cancel enrollment any time before the start of the first class session will receive a full refund of all monies paid.
• The University may retain 10% of the tuition agreed upon in the Enrollment Agreement or $150, whichever is less, for students who fail to attend in the enrollment period for which advanced payment was made.
• Refunds will be paid to the person or entity that paid the tuition within 15 calendar days after one of the following, whichever is applicable:
–– The date of cancellation by a student of his or her enrollment
–– Termination by the University of the enrollment of the student
–– The last day of an authorized leave of absence, if a student fails to return after the period of authorized absence
–– The last day of attendance of a student
• For purposes of this refund calculation, the period of attendance must be measured from the first day of instruction, as set forth in the Enrollment Agreement, through the last day of actual attendance, regardless of absences. In addition, tuition must be calculated using the tuition and fees set forth in the Enrollment Agreement and does not include books, educational supplies or equipment listed separately from tuition and fees. Books, educational supplies or equipment for individual use are not included in the policy for refund, and a separate refund will be paid by the University to the student if those items were not used by the student.
• If the University cancels or discontinues a course or educational program stated in the Enrollment
Agreement, the University will refund all monies paid for that course or program.

New Mexico
Students have the right to a full refund of all monies paid, including application and materials fees, if they withdraw within three business days after signing an Enrollment Agreement. To withdraw, a student must provide written notice to the University or appear personally at the University.
• If a student withdraws following the expiration of the three-day cancellation period, but prior to the first class, the University may retain up to $200.
• Following the beginning of the first class, refunds will be provided according to the University
Institutional Refund Policy.
• Refunds must be made within 30 calendar days of the University’s receipt of written notice of withdrawal or the University’s termination of the student’s enrollment, whichever is earlier.

Ohio
Students in the state of Ohio will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students have the right to a full refund of all monies paid if they withdraw within five calendar days of signing the Enrollment Agreement.
• A student who withdraws before the first class and after the five-day cancellation period is obligated for the registration fee.

*  lthough this information may be disclosed without prior written consent according to FERPA, the University policy is to
A
maintain the confidentiality of this student information.
**  tudent IRN, SSN or PIN numbers generally should not be released to a third party, unless necessary to perform a required task
S
(e.g., Student Financial Agreement, FBI request, etc.).

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• To cancel enrollment, a student must notify the local campus in writing on or before the five-day cancellation period after signing the Enrollment Agreement.
• Refunds will be paid no later than 30 days after cancellation.

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Oregon
Students in the state of Oregon will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy except all fees, including application fees, assessment fees, student service fees and book fees, are nonrefundable.

South Carolina
Students in the state of South Carolina will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional
Refund Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students have a right to a full refund of all monies paid, including application and materials fees, if they withdraw within 72 hours, excluding weekends and legal holidays, after signing the Enrollment Agreement.
• A full refund of all monies will be made to any applicant not accepted by the University.
• After the 72-hour cancellation period, the University may retain up to $100 if the student does not attend a course.
• The University may retain an administrative fee up to $100.
• Refunds will be paid within 40 days of a student’s official withdrawal.

Wisconsin
Students in the state of Wisconsin will have tuition refunded using the University Institutional Refund
Policy with the following exceptions:
• Students have the right to cancel enrollment until midnight of the third business day after receipt of notice of acceptance and are entitled to a full refund of any tuition paid.
• Refunds will be paid within 30 days of a student’s official withdrawal.
• If the University cancels or discontinues a course or educational program stated in the Enrollment
Agreement, the University will refund all monies paid for that course or program.

Online
The refund policy of the state where online campus students reside will be used to calculate their refund amount. The refund policy of the state where local campus students attend class will be used to calculate their refund amount.

Consumer Policies and Codes of Conduct
University of Phoenix Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
University student records are confidential for all schools receiving funding under programs administered by the U.S. Department of Education in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. Generally, information pertaining to a student record is not to be released to a third party without written or authorized electronic consent via a FERPA release form, judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena.
The University is required to provide students a copy of its FERPA policy annually and upon written request from students. Current students can obtain a copy of the FERPA policy in the appropriate online
Academic Catalog at https://www.phoenix.edu/programs/degree-programs/academic-catalog.html
Under FERPA, a student is defined as an individual who is or has attended an educational institution.
Students with at least one academically related activity (or one positive attendance “Y” posted, whichever happens sooner) in a university course are considered students at University of Phoenix.
Note: University Orientation Workshops are not considered university courses.

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Access to Education Records
University student records are confidential for all schools receiving funding under programs administered by the U.S. Department of Education in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). Generally, information pertaining to students’ records shall not be released to a third party without written or authorized electronic consent, via a FERPA Release form, judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena.
Education records are defined as all records, files, documents and materials that contain information directly related to a student, and maintained by an educational institution.
The following are not interpreted as education records:
• Personal records maintained by an individual; must be kept in the sole possession of the individual and are not accessible to others
• Records of the law enforcement unit of an educational institution
• Personnel records; records related to a person as an employee not used for any other purpose
• Medical records
–– Exception: The Student Health Insurance Plan Enrollment/Acknowledgment form completed by local campus students in New Jersey and Massachusetts is defined as an education record.
• Records created after the student is no longer a student; alumni records

Releasable Information — Directory
In compliance with FERPA, a University-designated representative without prior written or authorized electronic consent of the student can release the following educational record information, provided the student does not have a FERPA Hold Request form on record.
















Student name
Home address
Email address
Home telephone number
Year of birth
Dates of attendance at the University
Dates of admission to the University
University programs of study
University degree completion dates and type of degrees earned
Current enrollment status
Most recent previous institutions attended and degree(s) earned
Grade level (freshman, sophomore, junior or senior)
Photographs
Honors and awards received
Participation in officially recognized activities
Exception: If a student submits written or authorized electronic requests via a FERPA Hold Request form that directory information not be released to a third party, no information can be released, absent a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena. A FERPA Hold Request is valid throughout the student’s enrollment.
To add a FERPA Hold Request, the student must complete and submit a FERPA Hold Request form to the Registrar’s Office.
For a student to remove a FERPA Hold from their record, the student will need to fill out a FERPA
Hold Release form.
For a student to remove previously authorized parties from his or her record, the student would complete a FERPA Release Rescind form listing any/all parties to which that information should no longer be released.

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Information Not Released — Non-Directory
Information that must not be released:
In compliance with FERPA, the following student information shall not be released by the University without prior written or authorized electronic consent of the student, a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena. The student’s signature on the written requests shall be verified before acting upon the request.
• Place of birth*
• Month and day of birth*
• Social Security number (SSN), individual record number (IRN) or personal identification number
(PIN)**
• Grades or grade point averages
• Course schedules
• Employment information including: employer, position held, work address or work telephone number
• Academic performance information, such as academic suspension, probation disqualification or academic dishonesty charges
• Admission information, including test scores or entry grade point averages
• Financial and accounting information
• Gender*
• Race*
• Ethnicity*
• Citizenship*
• Country of origin*
Note: Non-directory information can only be released to third parties via telephone or in person if the student has provided written or authorized electronic consent including a security word. If the student does not complete the release information, including security word, information is not released via telephone or in person.
Note: All third parties, including parents, with inquiries require a FERPA Release form on file unless the third party meets one of the definitions under FERPA allowing access without prior written or authorized electronic consent from the student.

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Exceptions: The University may release personally identifiable information (PII), directory and nondirectory information without the student’s consent under the following conditions:
• School officials with legitimate educational interests, which include any University employee acting within the scope of her or his University employment, and any duly appointed agent or representative of the University acting within the scope of his or her appointment
• Person or company with whom the University has contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of using University employees or officials such as Apollo Education Group, Inc., Nelnet
Scholarship Management, Aptimus, Protiviti, ACS, ECMC Solutions, National Student Clearinghouse, iParadigms, LLC, Taylor Corporation, Education Sales Management, Double Positive, Hills Consulting
Group, SCRIP-SAFE, Student Outreach Solutions, i3, Inside Track, Salesforce, Iron Mountain, Outsell
Y-Connecting, Cenveo, IntraEdge, ITC InfoTech, TK20, Microsoft, Western International University, iGrad, HCL Technologies, Echosign, Regent Education, Google and other services.
• Collection agencies (Firstsource Advantage, Reliant Capital Solutions, FMS, CBEGroup, States
Recovery Systems, Northland Group, Primary Financial Services, Gatestone, Malcolm S. Gerald, I.C.
System, Asset Recovery Solutions, Capital Management Services, Account Control Technology, ATG
Credit, Tate and Kirlin Associates, Optio Solutions, Financial Recovery Services, Federal Bond and
Collection Service) and other services.
• Other schools to which a student seeks or intends to enroll
• Specified officials for audit and evaluation purposes
• Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student (The disclosure is in connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or received, if the information is necessary for such purposes as to determine the following: eligibility for aid, amount of aid, conditions for aid and/or enforcement of terms and conditions of the aid.)
• Organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the school
• Accrediting organizations
• Authorized representatives of the Comptroller General of the United States, Secretary of Education, or state and local educational authorities
• To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena
• Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies
• State and local authorities, pursuant to state law
• To appropriate officials to comply with federal law (e.g., the USA Patriot Act, Solomon Amendment,
SEVIS program)
• Under the Campus Sex Crime Prevention Act, institutions are permitted to disclose information concerning registered sex offenders who are required to register under the Violent Crime Control
& Law Enforcement Act.
• The institution may disclose the results of a disciplinary proceeding if the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or nonforcible sex offense and he or she has been found to have violated the institution’s policies and procedures with respect to the allegation. Disclosures may only be made if the institution determines the student did violate its policies and such disclosures must only include the name of the student, violation committed and any sanction imposed by the institution against the student.
• The institution must, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or a nonforcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearing conducted by the institution against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, the institution must provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.
• The disclosure is to organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, educational agencies or institutions. • If a student initiates legal action against an educational institution, the institution may disclose to the court, without a court order or subpoena, the student’s education records that are relevant for the institution to defend itself.
• The disclosure is to parents of a dependent student as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue
Code or to parents of students under the age of 21 when laws or university policies regarding alcohol

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or drugs are violated.

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A school official is defined as:
• A person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research or support staff position.
• A person employed by or under contract to the University to perform a task.
• A person serving on an institutional governing body or committee.
A school official has a legitimate educational interest if:











Performing a task specified in his or her job description or contract.
Performing a task related to a student’s education.
Providing a service or benefit related to a student or a student’s family.
Representing a school in which a student seeks to enroll.
Disclosing information to federal and state authorities auditing compliance of federal or state support programs.
Disclosing information in connection with financial aid, to determine financial aid eligibility, amount of aid, conditions for the aid, or to enforce the terms of conditions of the aid.
Disclosing information to state and local officials to whom this information is specifically allowed to be disclosed pursuant to state laws if the allowed disclosure concerns the juvenile justice system and the system’s ability to effectively serve the student whose records are released.
Performing studies on behalf of educational institutions.
Disclosing information to accrediting organizations carrying out their function.
Complying with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena provided notification to the student is made before complying with the subpoena.
The University can disclose personally identifiable information (PII), directory and non-directory, without student consent if the disclosure meets one of the following conditions:

• This disclosure is to other school officials, whom the University determines have legitimate educational interests.
• The disclosure is to officials of other schools where the student seeks or intends to enroll.
• The disclosure is, subject to requirements of 34 CFR 99.35, to authorized representatives of the
Comptroller General of the United States, Secretary, or state and local educational authorities.
• The disclosure is in connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or received, if the information is necessary for such purposes as to determine the following:
–– Eligibility for aid
–– Amount of aid
–– Conditions for aid
–– Enforce terms and conditions of the aid
Financial aid means a payment of funds (or a payment in kind of tangible or intangible property to the individual) that is conditioned on the individual’s attendance at an educational agency or institution [authority: 20 U.S.C.1232g (6)(1)(0)].
Students requesting demographic or PII on other University of Phoenix students for survey or research purposes must contact the appropriate director of operations and Academic Affairs after it has been approved through the University’s Human Subjects Committee and/or Committee on
Research as appropriate.
The University shall retain a record of disclosure of student information disclosed to a third party.
This information will be stored on the University computer system and will contain dates, names and reasons for release. Students shall have reasonable access to their educational records, may request to review their educational records and may challenge the contents of their educational records if they feel the contents to be inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of their privacy or other rights.

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Student Right to Access
Students wishing to review their educational records shall submit a written request to the Registrar specifying the records to be reviewed. Only records covered by FERPA will be made available. If necessary, the Registrar’s Office will work with a campus designee so that the student can review the record.
FERPA regulations require the University to comply with the students’ right to inspect and review their academic records by responding within 45 days from the time the University receives a written request to access their records. However, the Office of Admissions & Records will respond to students’ requests to review their records within 14 days from receipt of the request. Students should submit their request to the University Registrar and specify the record or records they wish to have a copy of or to inspect.
Students who wish to review their records at a campus location must present photo identification before access to educational records is allowed. For copies of records from a student’s file, the student must fill out and submit the Student Request for Information from Files form. Distance education students must submit a written request specifically outlining which record they would like to review.
A designated University official must be present when a student wishes to review his or her records at a campus location. This includes documents on file or student history notes that do not reference other student information. Printed files requested by the student and mailed from the Registrar’s
Office will not include history notes from any record systems.

Procedure
Students alleging that their University records are inaccurate or misleading, or who allege violations of FERPA, may present their challenges to the University Registrar.
Students have the right to correct record-keeping errors, but not to seek to overturn administration decisions and assessments. The Registrar shall review students’ challenges and, when appropriate, amend students’ records accordingly. Students will be notified within 14 days of the Registrar’s actions and, based on the action, may request a formal hearing.
A student must submit a request for amendment in writing to the Registrar identifying the specific portion of his or her record he or she wants changed and why he or she believes it’s inaccurate or in violation of his or her privacy. The Registrar will respond to the request within 14 days.
If the University denies the request to change the record, the Registrar will notify the student within
14 days of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to challenge the information.
A student’s request for a formal hearing must be made in writing and submitted to the Office of
Admissions & Records. The Registrar will arrange for a hearing, and notify the student within 14 days from the receipt of the request of the date, place and time of the hearing. Students may present relevant evidence and may be assisted or represented at the hearings by one or more persons of their choice, including an attorney, at the student’s expense.
The University shall be represented by a hearing panel appointed by the Registrar. The panel will be comprised of individuals that do not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. The panel shall consider all relevant evidence supporting students’ allegations of inaccurate or misleading information in students’ records. Decisions of the panel will be final.
The University will provide a written decision within 14 days of the hearing based on evidence presented at the hearing, and will include a summary of evidence presented and the rationale for the decision.
If the University decides that the challenged information is not misleading, inaccurate or in violation of the student’s privacy rights, it will notify the student within 14 days of his or her right to place in the record a statement commenting on the challenged information or a statement of reasons for disagreeing with the decision.

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The statement will be maintained as a part of the student’s record as long as the contested portion is maintained. If the University discloses the contested portion of the record, it must also disclose the statement.
If the University decides the information is inaccurate or in violation of the student’s right of privacy, it will amend the record and notify the student within 14 days, in writing, that the record has been amended.
Exception: Students may not inspect and review the following absent a judicial order or legally issued subpoena:
• Confidential letters and recommendations for which they have waived their rights of inspection
• Educational records containing information about more than one student
(Access is permitted only to that part of the record concerning the inquiring student.)
• Records of instructional, supervisory, administrative and certain educational personnel, which are in the possession of the originator
• Records connected with an application to attend the University if the application was denied
(For example, a student is enrolled in an undergraduate program and applies for admission to a graduate program but is denied.)
University of Phoenix cannot deny students access to their records. Copies do not need to be provided, unless by not providing copies, the students’ rights are denied.
Exception: The University may release foreign transcripts to students.
Rationale: Original transcripts from institutions in other countries may be difficult or impossible for students to replace.
The University reserves the right to deny transcripts or copies of records not required to be made available by FERPA in any of the following situations absent a judicial order or legally issued subpoena:
• The student is not in compliance with his or her UOPX financial plan.
• There is an unresolved disciplinary action against the student.
Transcripts will be issued as an exception to the above if one of the two following exception criteria is met:
• A student has filed for bankruptcy and has provided UOPX with a copy of the bankruptcy petition filed with the courts.
• A student has graduated from a previous UOPX program on record as that student had previously satisfied his or her financial obligation for that program.
If a student believes he or she qualifies for one of the aforementioned policies or exceptions but is unable to order a transcript on the University student website, the student should contact the
Admissions and Records Service Center at 800.866.3919 for assistance.
Students have the right to file a complaint with the FERPA. Inquiries should be directed to:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20202-5920

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For a period of 25 years following the death of a student, education records of deceased students may only be released to the executor of the estate (written authorization required) or immediate family members (notarized affidavit required) defined as: spouse or legally recognized domestic partner, parents, children (over the age of 18) and siblings. Beyond this time, requests for these records may be released to anyone after review and approval from the Registrar’s Office.
The University is required to provide students a copy of its FERPA policy annually and upon written request from the student.

Solomon Act
University of Phoenix complies with the Solomon Act, which provides certain information to military recruiters. Information that may be released includes the following:







Student name
Home address
Telephone listing
Age (date of birth)
Level of education
Academic major
If available, the following information will also be provided:

• Email address
• Degrees received
• Most recent educational institution attended

Gainful Employment Disclosures
Disclosures regarding University programs related to gainful employment are provided on the program home page for each eligible program. Each program home page is linked to gainful employment information specific to that program. For more information about gainful employment disclosures, visit http://www.phoenix.edu/programs/gainful-employment.html

Student Loan Code of Conduct
The University protects students with established loan policies. University of Phoenix follows federal regulations that govern student loan requirements. The Student Loan Code of Conduct at http:// www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/student_loan_code_of_conduct.html creates and maintains uniform student loan practices that focus on the best interest of student borrowers.
It also manages relationships between school employees, learning institutions, lender advisory board members and student loan organizations.
University of Phoenix encourages students to review the Student Loan Code of Conduct at http:// www.phoenix.edu/tuition_and_financial_options/student_loan_code_of_conduct.html to learn about loan regulations.

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Student Code of Conduct
The Student Code of Conduct of University of Phoenix supports the University mission to provide access to higher education opportunities that enable students to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve their professional goals, improve the productivity of their organizations and provide leadership and service to their communities. Students are expected to conduct themselves ethically, honestly and with integrity as responsible members of the University academic community.
This requires the demonstration of mutual respect and civility in academic and professional discourse.
A University is a marketplace of ideas and, in the search for truth, it is essential that freedom exists for contrary ideas to be expressed. Accordingly, students are expected to respect the rights and privileges of others and to foster an environment conducive to learning. Students are accountable for their actions and are required to work independently, as well as collaboratively with teams, in achieving learning goals and objectives. By virtue of membership in the University academic community, students accept an obligation to abide by this Student Code of Conduct. Conduct, either on or off campus, determined to impair, interfere or obstruct the opportunities of others to learn or that disrupts the mission, processes or orderly functions of the University will be deemed misconduct and shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary action.
For additional information on the Student Code of Conduct, see a local campus academic catalog, https://www.phoenix.edu/programs/degree-programs/academic-catalog.html, or contact the local campus, http://www.phoenix.edu/campus-locations.html

Consumer Privacy Policy
Summarized below are key elements of the University Privacy Policy. The full version of the policy is available at http://www.phoenix.edu/copyright-legal/privacy_policy.html

Scope of Privacy Policy
This policy applies to website visitors, current and potential students, alumni and any other user of services offered through our Sites including any websites or mobile applications operated by or on their behalf. This policy applies to both online and offline collection, storage, processing and transfer of personal information. However, certain Sites or services may be subject to additional privacy policies or privacy disclosures relating to the services provided on the Site(s) (collectively “Additional Policies”).

Information Collected
We collect various types of information through our Sites and other websites where you can express interest in our services, through our mobile applications, over the phone and in person where print materials and digital technology may be used to collect information from you. Some information is collected automatically through various web and Internet technologies, including Social Networking tools used by your University to foster communication and collaboration among members of our community. Other information is collected when you provide it in response to an advertisement, a survey or a request for information; apply for admission or financial aid; register for classes; order educational or other products and services; set up a social network or other site profile; or use one of our career resources, learning assessments, or other interactive tools. We may also obtain information from other sources and combine that with information we collect about you.

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Information Uses
We will not sell, rent or lease your personal information to others except as provided in this policy.
We may collect, use and disclose personal information for the following purposes:




























To determine your admissibility and to register you for your selected educational programs
To contact you regarding your status with the University
To provide requested products and services
To respond to your inquiries and provide customer support
To administer promotions in which you have indicated an interest
For our internal marketing purposes, which includes, but is not limited to, sending you material about products, services, updates, etc. that we think may be of interest to you
For fostering communication and collaboration among members of your University community through social networks
For sharing with our Educational Partners who may contact you with respect to their educational or other services
For sharing with our Educational Partners or Business Associates who are performing services on our behalf
To analyze how Sites and services are being accessed and used
For investigation of information security and information asset protection-related incidents
To test, correct and improve our content, applications and services
To develop new applications, products and services
For Online Behavioral Advertising purposes
To improve Site and service performance and delivery
To prevent potentially illegal activities (including illegal downloading of copyrighted materials in accordance with our Copyright Infringement Policy)
To investigate suspicious information that denotes illegal activity such as financial aid fraud
To analyze academic and learning outcomes and preferences
For external academic research and scholarship
To analyze risk and business results
To obtain payment for services that we provide to you
To provide you with information concerning arrangements and other options for the repayment of funds loaned to you for your education
To maintain business records for reasonable periods
To enforce our Terms of Use
To provide to Educational Partners, Business Associates or Unrelated Entities in connection with the contemplated or actual reorganization, merger, acquisition, financing, securitization, insuring, sale or other disposal of all or part of our business or assets, including for the purposes of determining whether to proceed with such transaction or fulfilling any records or other reporting requirements to such parties. In the event of any actual reorganization, merger or acquisition, such information may be transferred as part of the transaction to the acquirer.
And/or as may be required or permitted by legal, regulatory, industry self-regulatory, insurance, audit or security requirements applicable to Apollo Education Group, Inc., our Educational Partners or our
Business Associates.

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Your Rights and Choices
Marketing Communications

If you do not wish to receive marketing email communications from us, you may express your choice where indicated on the applicable email or other communication, or cut and paste this link into a browser: http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/contact_us/unsubscribe.html
If you do not wish to receive marketing telephone calls or mailings, you may express your choice to opt out by emailing Office.ComplianceUOPX@phoenix.edu
If you do not wish to receive text messages, reply STOP to cancel future text messages. By sending
STOP, you agree to one additional confirmation message stating that you’ve opted out and will no longer receive text messages from University of Phoenix. To get help, text HELP. You may also get additional support or help by sending an email to TextMsgSupport@phoenix.edu or by calling 866.766.0766.
Under California’s Shine the Light law, Cal. Civ. Code § 1798.83, we provide California residents the ability to opt out of disclosures to Educational Partners for direct marketing purposes. To opt out of these disclosures at no cost, email Office.ComplianceUOPX@phoenix.edu
Do Not Track and Online Behavioral Advertising

University of Phoenix does not itself respond to web browser-based DNT signals.
We or our Business Associates may use data collected on this site for Online Behavioral Advertising purposes, e.g., to customize ads to you on other websites as you browse the web. If you do not want your browsing behavior on the sites to be collected for Online Behavioral Advertising purposes, visit http://info.evidon.com/pub_info/184 Other Collection, Use and Disclosure

You may be able to opt out of our collection, use and disclosure of your personal information in other situations subject to applicable contractual, academic, legal or technical restrictions and reasonable notice. Note that if you opt out of certain uses of your personal information, we may no longer be able to provide certain products or services. For more information on your ability to opt out, email
Office.ComplianceUOPX@phoenix.edu
Other Important Information

We will take commercially reasonable measures to secure and store your information to protect against the loss, misuse and alteration of the information under our control. We utilize industrystandard security measures when accepting your credit card information during your registration or other transaction you have initiated with us, as well as whenever we ask you to log in to any of our sites.
If you become a student, your educational records are subject to the U.S. federal Family Education
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), state laws and your University policies. To obtain a copy of the
“Students’ Rights to Privacy and Access to Educational Records” policy, visit http://www.phoenix.edu/ about_us/regulatory/consumer-information.html You may also contact us via one of the below methods:
Mail: University of Phoenix
Attn: Registrar’s Office
3201 E. Elwood St.
Mail Stop: CF-A103
Phoenix, AZ 85034-7259
Email: ARSC@phoenix.edu
Phone: 800.866.3919

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University of Phoenix may update this policy or revise it from time to time. If you are concerned about how your personal information is used or disclosed, you should contact the University as described above or review the web page at http://www.phoenix.edu/copyright-legal/privacy_policy.html

How to Contact Us or Access Your Information
If you want access to or wish to update any of your personal information or have any questions about our privacy practices, contact the University Office of Compliance at Office.ComplianceUOPX@phoenix.edu or
University of Phoenix
Attn: Office of Compliance
1625 S. Fountainhead Pkwy.
Mail Stop: CF-S903
Phoenix, AZ 85040

Dispute Resolution Policy and Procedures
The following policy and procedures are to be used to resolve disputes by both current and former students of the University. This policy is effective as of September 1, 2012. Students who change from one program to another program at a different degree level (for example, a student who changes from an associate-level program to a bachelor-level program) will be considered newly entering students for purposes of this policy. Students are encouraged to bring the concerns outlined below to the attention of the appropriate individual/department, as set forth in Step One below. These individuals/departments will investigate and resolve such concerns accordingly. A covered dispute is subject to the conditions below and may be submitted to the formal Dispute Resolution Procedures set forth in this section if not satisfactorily resolved through the prior intervention of Step One.
In connection with the University policies identified in Step One below, this policy is intended to address disputes between a student and the University and create a framework by which students and the University can resolve all such disputes arising from a student’s interactions with the University.
Although the University strongly recommends utilization of the resources identified in Step One to resolve such disputes, the only dispute resolution policy that is mandatory is the arbitration policy.
Arbitration is the exclusive means by which all covered disputes asserted by either a student (whether current or former) or the University, involving justiciable disputes and/or or any justiciable matter arising from the student’s interactions with the University, shall be decided and finally resolved.
Claims and/or disputes covered by this policy fall into one of two levels:
• Level One disputes involve alleged violations of state or federal law, any statutory or common law tort claim or alleged breach of contract claim, claims of discrimination or harassment pursuant to state or federal law, or any other issue of a substantial nature. If not resolved sooner, Level One disputes may be processed through all three steps of the following Dispute Resolution Procedures.
• Unless such issue involves a violation of law, issues of a lesser nature — for example, Student Code of Conduct violations, general student grievances, academic issues and grade disputes, etc. — are considered Level Two disputes and, if not resolved sooner, may be processed only through Step One of the following Dispute Resolution Procedures.

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Step One: Internal Resolution
Students should first attempt to resolve any dispute or issue related to the following subject matters, or like subject matters, by contacting the following individuals/departments, and utilizing the process set forth in the corresponding section(s) of the Academic Catalog, as referenced below. Please note that the information provided below represents only the initial contact with whom such disputes should be reported. Students should carefully consult the Academic Catalog (https://www.phoenix. edu/programs/degree-programs/academic-catalog.html) to gain a fuller understanding of the processes associated with reporting and resolving disputes related to these subject matters.
• Allegations of sex discrimination or sexual harassment: Camie Pratt, Associate Vice President and Title IX Coordinator, Office of Dispute Management (“ODM”). See Nondiscrimination Policy and Harassment Policy in Academic Catalog.
• Allegations concerning all other forms of discrimination: Campus Director of Academic Affairs,
Campus Director of Operations, Campus Director of Student Services, or their respective designee.
See Nondiscrimination Policy and Harassment Policy in Academic Catalog.
• Student Code of Conduct violations, other than sex discrimination and sexual harassment:
Registrar. See Student Code of Conduct section in Academic Catalog.
• General student grievances (other than sex discrimination and sexual harassment):
Office of Dispute Management. See General Student Grievances section in Academic Catalog.
• Student grievances relating to financial aid, account balances or collections:
Campus Management. See General Student Grievances section in Academic Catalog.
• Academic issues: Student Appeals Center in ODM. See Student Appeals Center Section in
Academic Catalog.
• Grade disputes: Director of Academic Affairs or designee. See Grade Disputes section in
Academic Catalog.

Step Two: Mediation
If a Level One dispute is not resolved as a result of Step One, then prior to proceeding to Arbitration, all parties are encouraged to participate in a formal mediation session facilitated by a professional, neutral mediator. Mediation is not mandatory but is strongly encouraged as an effective way to resolve disputes. Mediation is not a mandatory prerequisite to arbitration.
The physical location for the mediation shall be mutually selected by the parties. If the parties elect mediation, the student is required to pay the sum of $100 toward the mediation costs, which amount shall be paid directly to the mediator. Any other costs associated with the mediation shall be paid by the University. Both the student and the University shall submit in writing to the other the name(s) of one or more professional, neutral mediators as a potential mediator in the matter. The parties will exercise their best efforts to agree on the selection of a mediator. If the parties cannot agree on the selection of a mediator, then the parties can submit the matter to the American Arbitration
Association for the purpose of having a neutral mediator appointed.
The mediator shall schedule the mediation as expeditiously as possible. All parties will have the opportunity to attend and participate in the mediation. Any party may be represented by counsel of his or her choosing, at his or her own expense. The mediator shall direct how the mediation will be conducted. As with all mediations, any resulting resolution must be agreed to by the parties, which shall constitute a final and binding resolution of the matter.

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Step Three: Binding Arbitration
1. 
This Binding Arbitration provision (“Arbitration Agreement”) is governed by the Federal Arbitration
Act 9 U.S.C. § 1 et seq., and evidences a transaction involving commerce. This Arbitration Agreement is a condition of becoming enrolled with the University. This Arbitration Agreement applies to any covered dispute arising out of or related to the student’s interactions with the University. Nothing contained in this Arbitration Agreement shall be construed to prevent or excuse the student from utilizing the University’s existing internal procedures for resolution of complaints, as set forth in
Step One above, and this Arbitration Agreement is not intended to be a substitute for the utilization of such procedures. Except as it otherwise provides, this Arbitration Agreement is intended to apply to the resolution of disputes that otherwise would be resolved in a court of law, and therefore this
Arbitration Agreement requires all such disputes to be resolved only by an arbitrator through final and binding arbitration and not by way of court or jury trial. Such disputes include without limitation disputes arising out of or relating to interpretation or application of this Arbitration Agreement, including the enforceability, revocability or validity of the Arbitration Agreement or any portion of the Arbitration Agreement. Regardless of any other terms of this Arbitration Agreement, claims may be brought before an administrative agency if applicable law permits access to such an agency notwithstanding the existence of an agreement to arbitrate. Such administrative claims include without limitation claims or charges brought before the U.S. Department of Education, State Boards of Education or the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs.
2. 
Notwithstanding any other language in this Arbitration Agreement, a student’s Enrollment
Agreement, the Academic Catalog or any other University policy or practice, this Arbitration
Agreement will not be unilaterally revised, modified or eliminated by the University with respect to any covered dispute after that dispute has been submitted to arbitration pursuant to this
Arbitration Agreement.
3. 
The parties shall select the neutral arbitrator and/or arbitration sponsoring organization by mutual agreement. If the parties cannot mutually agree to an arbitrator and/or arbitration sponsoring organization, the arbitration will be held and the arbitrator selected under the auspices of the
American Arbitration Association (AAA). Except as provided in this Arbitration Agreement, the arbitration shall be held in accordance with the then current Commercial Arbitration Procedures of the AAA. The AAA rules are available at http://www.adr.org. However, nothing in said rules or procedures and/or any modification thereto shall affect the enforceability and validity of the Class
Action Waiver, including but not limited to the provision that the enforceability of the Class Action
Waiver may be determined only by a court and not by an arbitrator. Unless the parties jointly agree otherwise, the arbitrator shall be either an attorney who is experienced in the subject matter at issue and licensed to practice law in the state in which the arbitration is convened, or a retired judge.
4. 
The party bringing the claim must demand arbitration in writing and deliver the written demand by hand or first class mail to the other party within the applicable statute of limitations period. Any demand for arbitration made to the University shall be provided to the Legal Department, University of Phoenix at 4025 S. Riverpoint Parkway, Mail Stop: CF-KX01, Phoenix, AZ 85040. The arbitrator shall resolve all disputes regarding the timeliness or propriety of the demand for arbitration. A party may apply to a court of competent jurisdiction for temporary or preliminary injunctive relief in connection with an arbitrable controversy, but only upon the ground that the award to which that party may be entitled may be rendered ineffectual without such provisional relief.
5.  arbitration, the parties will have the right to conduct adequate civil discovery, bring dispositive
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motions, present witnesses and evidence as needed to present their cases and defenses, and any disputes in this regard shall be resolved by the arbitrator.

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6. LASS ACTION WAIVER: There will be no right or authority for any dispute to be brought, heard or
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arbitrated as a class, collective or representative action or as a class member in any purported class, collective action or representative proceeding (Class Action Waiver). Notwithstanding any other clause contained in this Arbitration Agreement, the preceding sentence shall not be severable from this Agreement in any case in which the dispute to be arbitrated is brought as a class, collective or representative action. Notwithstanding any other clause contained in this Arbitration Agreement, any claim that all or part of the Class Action Waiver is unenforceable, unconscionable, void or voidable may be determined only by a court of competent jurisdiction and not by an arbitrator.
7. 
Each party will pay the fees for his, her or its own attorneys, subject to any remedies to which that party may later be entitled under applicable law. The University shall initially bear the administrative costs associated with the conduct of the Arbitration, subject to: (1) a one-time payment by the student toward these costs equal to the filing fee then required by the court of general jurisdiction in the state where the student in question attended the University; and
(2) any subsequent award by the Arbitrator in accordance with applicable law.
8. 
The Federal Rules of Evidence shall apply. The arbitrator shall have jurisdiction to hear and rule on prehearing disputes and is authorized to hold pre-hearing conferences by telephone or in person, as the arbitrator deems necessary. The arbitrator shall have the authority to entertain a motion to dismiss and/or a motion for summary judgment by any party and shall apply the standards governing such motions under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and applicable federal common law.
9. 
Within 30 days of the close of the arbitration hearing, any party will have the right to prepare, serve on the other party and file with the arbitrator a brief. The arbitrator may award any party any remedy to which that party is entitled under applicable law, but such remedies shall be limited to those that would be available to a party in his or her individual capacity in a court of law for the claims presented to and decided by the arbitrator, and no remedies that otherwise would be available to an individual in a court of law will be forfeited by virtue of this Arbitration Agreement.
The arbitrator will issue a decision or award in writing, stating the essential findings of fact and conclusions of law. Except as may be permitted or required by law, as determined by the arbitrator, neither a party nor an arbitrator may disclose the existence, content or results of any arbitration hereunder without the prior written consent of all parties. A court of competent jurisdiction shall have the authority to enter a judgment upon the award made pursuant to the arbitration.
10.  t is against University policy for any student to be subject to retaliation if he or she exercises his
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or her right to assert claims under this Arbitration Agreement. If any student believes that he or she has been retaliated against by anyone at the University, the student should immediately report this to the ODM.
11.  his section entitled “Binding Arbitration” is the full and complete agreement relating to the formal
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resolution of student-related disputes in arbitration. Except as stated in paragraph 6, above, in the event any portion of this Arbitration Agreement is deemed unenforceable, the remainder of this Arbitration Agreement will be enforceable. If the Class Action Waiver is deemed to be unenforceable, the University and the student agree that this Arbitration Agreement is otherwise silent as to any party’s ability to bring a class, collective or representative action in arbitration.

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State Authorization and Contact Information for Filing Complaints
University of Phoenix is regulated by a large number of state regulatory bodies across the country for filing complaints in the state that a student resides. If a student chooses to file a complaint, he or she can submit an internal complaint to the University’s Office of Dispute Management or file an external complaint with the designated state regulatory agency. For Online students who reside in Alabama,
Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, Tennessee,
Washington or Wisconsin, students can file a complaint with their own state regulatory agency.
All other Online students should file external complaints with the Arizona State Board for Private
Postsecondary Education. The following is a list of the contact information for those regulatory bodies.
Alabama: The student may contact the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education,
PO Box 302130, Montgomery, AL 36130-2130; telephone 334.242.2959.
Arizona: The student may contact the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education,
1400 W. Washington, Room 260, Phoenix, AZ 85007; telephone 602.542.2399.
Arkansas: The student may contact the Arkansas Department of Higher Education,
114 East Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201-3818; telephone 501.371.2065.
California: The student may contact the California Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education,
C/O Department of Consumer Affairs, PO Box 980818, W. Sacramento, CA 95798-0818; telephone 916.431.6959, 888.370.7589.
Colorado: The student may contact the Department of Higher Education, Commission on Higher
Education, 1300 Broadway Road, Second Floor, Denver, CO 80203; telephone 303.866.2723,
303.866.4209.
Connecticut: The student may contact the Office of Higher Education, Connecticut State Board of
Education, 61 Woodland Street, Hartford, CT 06105-2326; telephone 860.947.1800, 860.947.1821.
Delaware: The student may contact the Delaware Department of Education, The Townsend Building,
401 Federal St., Suite 2, Dover, DE 19901-3639; telephone 302.735.4000.
Florida: The student may contact the Commission for Independent Education, 325 West Gaines
Street, Suite 1414, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400; telephone 850.245.3200.
Georgia: The student may contact the Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission,
2082 East Exchange Place, Suite 220, Tucker, GA 30084; telephone 770.414.3306.
Hawaii: The student may contact the Hawaii Post-Secondary Education Authorization Program, P.O.
Box 541, Honolulu, HI 96809; telephone 808.586.7327.
Idaho: The student may contact the Idaho State Board of Education, P.O. Box 83720, Boise, ID
83720-0037; telephone 208.332.1587.
Illinois: The student may contact the Illinois Board of Higher Education, 431 East Adams Street,
Second Floor, Springfield, IL 62701-1418; telephone 217.557.7359, website: www.ibhe.org.
Indiana: The student may contact the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, Board for Proprietary
Education, 101 West Ohio Street, Suite 670, Indianapolis, IN 46204; telephone 317.464.4400.
Iowa: The student may contact the Iowa College Student Aid Commission, 430 E. Grand Avenue, FL 3,
Des Moines, IA 50309-1920; telephone 515.725.3400.
Kansas: The student may contact the Kansas Board of Regents, 1000 SW Jackson, Suite 520,
Topeka, KS 66612-1368; telephone 785.296.4936, 785.296.4917.
Kentucky: The student may contact the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education,
1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 320, Frankfort, KY 40601-8204; telephone 502.573.1555.

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Louisiana: The student may contact the State of Louisiana Board of Regents, P.O. Box 3677,
Baton Rouge, LA 70821; telephone 225.342.4253.
Maryland: The student may contact the Maryland Higher Education Commission, 6 North Liberty
Street, Baltimore, MD 21201; telephone 800.974.0203.
Massachusetts: The student may contact the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education,
One Ashburton Place, Room 1401, Boston, MA 02108-1696; telephone 617.994.6950.
Michigan: The student may contact the Michigan Department of Education, P.O. Box 30008 (or)
608 W. Allegan, Lansing, MI 48909; telephone 517.373.9235.
Minnesota: The student may contact the Minnesota Office of Higher Education, 1450 Energy Park
Drive, Suite 350, St. Paul, MN 55108; telephone 651.642.0567, 800.657.3866.
Mississippi: The student may contact the Mississippi Commission on College Accreditation, 3825
Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211; telephone 601.432.6372.
Missouri: The student may contact the State of Missouri Coordinating Board for Higher Education,
205 Jefferson Street, Jefferson City, MO 65101; telephone 573.751.2361.
Nebraska: The student may contact the Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary
Education, P.O. Box 95005, Lincoln, NE 68509-5005; telephone 402.471.0020, 402.471.2847.
Nevada: The student may contact the Nevada Commission on Postsecondary Education, 8778 S.
Maryland Parkway, Suite 115, Las Vegas, NV 89123; telephone 702.486.7330.
New Jersey: The student may contact the New Jersey Secretary of Higher Education,
20 W. State Street, PO Box 542, Trenton, NJ 08625-0542; telephone 609.292.4310, 609.984.2709.
New Mexico: The student may contact the New Mexico Higher Education Department,
2048 Galisteo Street, Santa Fe, NM 87505-2100; telephone 505.476.8400.
North Carolina: The student may contact the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina,
General Administration, 910 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2688; telephone 919.962.4558.
Ohio: The student may contact the Ohio Board of Regents, 25 South Front Street,
Columbus, OH 43215; telephone 614.466.6000.
Oklahoma: The student may contact the Oklahoma State Regents of Higher Education, 655 Research
Parkway, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, OK 73104-3603; telephone 405.225.100, 405.225.9142.
Oregon: The student may contact the Oregon Office of Degree Authorization, 1500 Valley River Dr.,
Suite 100, Eugene, OR 97401; telephone 541.687.7478.
Pennsylvania: The student may contact the Pennsylvania Department of Education,
333 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333; telephone 717.783.6785.
Puerto Rico: The student may contact the Consejo de Educacion Superior de Puerto Rico/Puerto
Rico Council on Higher Education, PO Box 19900, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00910-1900; telephone
787.724.7100 ext. 2022 or ext. 2016.
South Carolina: The student may contact the Nonpublic Postsecondary Institution Licensing, 1333
Main Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29201; telephone 803.737.2281.
Tennessee: The student may contact the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Parkway Towers,
Suite 1700, 404 James Robertson Pkwy, Nashville, TN 37243-0830; telephone 615.741.3605.
Texas: The student may contact the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, P.O. Box 12788,
Capitol Station, Austin, TX 78711; telephone 512.427.6520.
Utah: The student may contact the Utah Division of Consumer Protection, 160 East 300 East, 2nd
Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84111; telephone 801.530.6601, or toll-free in Utah 800.721.SAFE.
Virginia: The student may contact the Commonwealth of Virginia Council of Higher Education,
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James Monroe Building, 101 North Fourteenth Street, Richmond, VA 23219; telephone 804.225.2600.
Washington: The student may contact the Washington Student Achievement Council, PO Box 43430,
Olympia, WA 98504-3430; telephone 360.753.7869, 360.753.7866.
Washington DC: The student may contact the Government of the District of Columbia Education
Licensure Commission, 810 1st Street, NE, 2nd Fl., Washington, DC 20002; telephone 202.727.2824.
Wisconsin: The student may contact the Wisconsin Educational Approval Board, 201 West
Washington Avenue, 3rd Floor, Madison, WI 53703; telephone 608.266.1996, 608.266.1996.
Wyoming: The student may contact the Wyoming Department of Education, Hathaway Bldg.,
2 Floor, 2300 Capitol Avenue, Cheyenne, WY 82002-0050; telephone 307.777.5712.

Copyright Infringement and Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Policy
Copyright Law
Copyright is a form of legal protection provided by U.S. law, Title 17 U.S.C. §512(c) (2), which protects an owner’s right to control the reproduction, distribution, performance, display and transmission of a copyrighted work. The public, in turn, is provided with specific rights for fair use of copyrighted works.
Copyrighted works protect original works of authorship and include








Books, articles and other writings
Songs and other musical works
Movies and television productions
Pictures, graphics and drawings
Computer software
Pantomimes and choreographic works
Sculptural and architectural works
Specific information on copyright law and fair use may be found at the following sites:

• The U.S. Copyright Office: http://www.copyright.gov
•  he Electronic Frontier Foundation fair use frequently asked questions:
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http://w2.eff.org/IP/eff_fair_use_faq.php

Copyright Infringement
The copyright law provides the owner of a copyright the exclusive right to do the following:
• Reproduce the work in copies.
• Prepare derivative works based upon the work.
• Distribute copies of the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease or lending.
• Perform the work publicly.
• Display the copyrighted work publicly.
• Perform the work publicly by means of a digital audio transmission in the case of sound recordings.
The copyright law states, “Anyone who violates any of the exclusive rights of the copyright owner is an infringer of the copyright or right of the author.”
Generally, under the law, one who engages in any of these activities without obtaining the copyright owner’s permission may be liable for infringement.

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Peer-to-Peer File Sharing
Peer-to-Peer (P2P) file sharing is a general term that describes software programs that allow computer users, utilizing the same P2P software, to connect with each other and directly access digital files from one another’s hard drives. Many copyrighted works may be stored in digital form, such as software, movies, videos, photographs, etc. Through P2P file sharing it has become increasingly easy to store and transfer these copyrighted works to others, thus increasing the risk that users of P2P software and file-sharing technology will infringe the copyright protections of content owners.
If P2P file-sharing applications are installed on your computer, you may be sharing someone else’s copyrighted materials without realizing you are doing so. As a user of the University network, recognizing the legal requirements of the files that you may be sharing with others is important.
You should be careful not to download and share copyrighted works with others.
The transfer and distribution of these works without authorization of the copyright holder is illegal and prohibited.

Violations and Penalties Under Federal Law
In addition to University sanctions under its policies as more fully described below, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or statutory damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For willful infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505.
Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense.

The University Plans to Effectively Combat Unauthorized Distribution of
Copyrighted Material; Student Sanctions
A student’s conduct in the University classrooms and websites is subject to and must fully conform to the University Student Code of Conduct policy, its Acceptable Use policy and any other applicable
University policies.
The University may monitor traffic or bandwidth on the networks utilizing information technology programs designed to detect and identify indicators of illegal P2P file-sharing activity. In addition to, or as an alternative, the University may employ other technical means to reduce or block illegal file sharing and other impermissible activities.
The University will also provide for vigorous enforcement and remediation activities for those students identified through the University Digital Millennium Copyright Act policy as potential violators or infringers of copyright.
Disciplinary sanctions will be based on the seriousness of the situation and may include remediation based on a comprehensive system of graduated responses designed to curb illegal file sharing and copyright offenses through limiting and denial of network access or other appropriate means. These sanctions may be in conjunction with additional sanctions through the University Student Code of
Conduct, its Acceptable Use Policy and any other University policy applicable to the particular situation.
Students who are subject to professional codes of conduct that apply to their enrollment at the
University shall be sanctioned according to the requirements of the respective code.

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Education and Awareness
The University uses a variety of means to inform students, faculty and other network users about copyright laws and the response to copyright infringement claims by the University.
The University informs its campus community through the Consumer Information Guide and other periodic communications that unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, including unauthorized P2P file sharing, may subject students and faculty to civil and criminal liabilities and the extent of the possible liabilities.
The Consumer Information Guide, http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/regulatory/consumerinformation.html, is available on the University website, is provided to potential students and employees, and is sent by email on a yearly basis to current students, faculty and employees.

Legal Sources for Online Music and Videos
The following links are online sources that provide information on legal access to copyrighted music and videos:
EDUCAUSE is an association of colleges and universities, which maintains a list of legal media sources: http://www.educause.edu/legalcontent The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) provides a list of legal music sources: http://www.riaa.com/toolsforparents.php?content_selector=legal-music-services The legal sources for online music and videos are reviewed annually by the Sr. Director of Governance,
Risk and Compliance.

Digital Millennium Copyright Act Policy
The University computer networks, including its online library and classroom environment, are critical assets. Accordingly, University of Phoenix respects the rights of the copyright owners and expects its faculty, staff, students and other network users to comply with U.S. copyright laws. Federal law prohibits the reproduction, distribution, public display or performance of copyrighted materials over the Internet without permission of the copyright owner, except in compliance with fair use or other copyright applicable statutory exceptions. For more information on copyright law, please refer to the
University’s Copyright Infringement and Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Policy.
In addition to sanctions that may be applicable under the University Student Code of Conduct Policy, the
Acceptable Use of Computing Resources Policy or other policies, University of Phoenix may terminate the network accounts or access to users who have repeatedly infringed on the copyrights of others.
University of Phoenix, in compliance with the federal Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), has established a mandated process for receiving and tracking alleged incidents of copyright infringement.
The University has designated an agent who will investigate notices of alleged copyright infringement and take appropriate actions. Such actions may include terminating repeat infringers’ accounts under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). The copyright infringement notices must be given in writing, preferably by email, or by U.S. mail to the agent listed below:
University of Phoenix
Attn: Copyright Agent
Subject: Copyright Compliance
4025 S. Riverpoint Pkwy.
Mail Stop: CF-K612
Phoenix, AZ 85040
Email: CopyrightAgent@apollo.edu

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If a valid DMCA notification is received, the University will respond under this process by taking down the infringing content found on our networks. On taking down content under the DMCA, the
University will take reasonable steps to contact the owner of the removed content so that a counter notification may be filed. Upon receiving a valid counter notification, the University will generally restore the content in question, unless the University receives notice from the notification provider that a legal action has been filed seeking a court order to restrain the alleged infringer from engaging in the infringing activity.
Please note that the DMCA provides that you may be liable for damages including costs and attorneys’ fees if you falsely claim that someone is infringing on your copyright. Alternatively, you can also be liable for damages including attorneys’ fees if you materially misrepresent that an activity is infringing on the copyright of another. Therefore, the University recommends contacting an attorney if you are unsure whether your work or the work of another is protected by copyright laws.

Filing Notice of Alleged Infringement
Following is the process for filing a notification under the DMCA. Notice must be given in writing to the designated agent as specified above and contain the following information:
1. 
Identify in sufficient detail the copyrighted work that you believe has been infringed upon; for example, describe the work that you own.
2. 
Identify the material that you claim is infringing on your copyright as set forth in number one and provide detailed information that is reasonably sufficient to locate the infringing item; for example, provide the link to the infringing material.
3. Provide sufficient contact information: phone number, address and email address.
4.  possible, provide information that allows the University to notify the alleged infringing party
If
of notice of the alleged infringement.
5. 
The following statement must be included in your notice: “I have a good faith belief that the use of the copyrighted materials described above and contained on the service is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent or by protection of law.”
6. 
The following statement must be included in your notice: “I swear, under penalty of perjury, that the information in the notification is accurate and that I am the copyright owner or am authorized to act on behalf of the owner of an exclusive right that is allegedly infringed.”
7. The notice must be signed.

Filing Counter Notification of Alleged Infringement
The person or provider of the alleged infringing material may present a counter notification pursuant to the DMCA. Upon proper counter notification, the University may reinstate the removed content.
Notice must be given in writing to the designated copyright agent as specified above and contain the following information:
• Identify the material that has been removed. This may include providing the location or the URL when possible.
• Provide your name, address, telephone number and email address if available.
• Provide a statement that you consent to the jurisdiction of Federal District Court for the judicial district in which you reside, or for any address outside the United States or any judicial district, in which the service provider may be found, and that you will accept service of process from the person who provided notification to the University of the alleged infringement or an agent of such person.
• Provide the following statement: “I swear, under penalty of perjury, that I have a good faith belief that the material identified above was removed or disabled as a result of a mistake or misidentification of the material to be removed or disabled.”
• The notice must be signed.

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Upon receiving a valid counter notification, the University will provide the person who filed the original notification with a copy of the counter notice and inform him or her that the material will be reinstated or access to it restored between 10 and 14 business days following receipt of the counter notice, pursuant to the DMCA unless the University receives notification that legal action to seek a court order restraining the alleged infringer from further engaging in the infringing activity has been filed.

Vaccinations and Immunizations
Information regarding program admissions requirements, including immunization requirements for designated states, is located at http://www.phoenix.edu/admissions/admission_requirements.html

Register to Vote
The National Mail Voter Registration Form can be used to register U.S. citizens to vote, to update registration information due to a change of name, make a change of address or to register with a political party. You must follow the state-specific instructions listed for your state. After completing the form, you must sign your name where indicated and send it to your state or local election office for processing.
The national form also contains voter registration rules and regulations for each state and territory.
For more information about registering to vote, contact your state election office at http://www.eac. gov/voter_resources/contact_your_state.aspx Register to vote by following your state-specific instructions and using the National Mail Voter
Registration form at http://www.eac.gov/voter_resources/register_to_vote.aspx

Campus Safety and Security
Campus Safety Policies
The University Campus Safety policies at http://cdn.assets-phoenix.net/content/dam/altcloud/ doc/about_uopx/Campus-Safety-Policies.pdf have been prepared to increase University of Phoenix community’s awareness of current programs that exist to protect its members’ safety and well-being and to satisfy the requirements of the Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities Act and Clery
Act. The information included relates to the following:














Alcohol and other drug abuse prevention, health risks and counseling services
Annual crime statistics
Available counseling and assistance resources
Crime prevention measures
Reporting criminal activities
Emergency mass notification
Information related to campus safety programs
Penalties and sanctions regarding the unlawful use, sale, possession or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol
Legal effects of alcohol and other drug use
Prohibited use or distribution of alcohol and other drugs
Safety and awareness
Sex offender registry
Sexual violence policy and prevention
The information is intended to provide a useful description of University of Phoenix campus safety policies; however, it is not intended to serve as a contractual agreement between the University and the recipient. Additionally, the University will disseminate and publicize, for each of its campus locations, crime statistics from the most recent calendar year and two preceding calendar years.
Visit http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/campus-safety/campus-safety-policies.html to access a PDF

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file of University of Phoenix Campus Safety Policies.

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Campus Crime Statistics
This report is compiled in conjunction with University of Phoenix’s Campus Safety Policies. The following statistics are in accordance with definitions used in the Uniform Crime Reporting System of the Department of Justice and FBI, as modified by the Hate Crime Statistics Act. The data includes all crimes reported to the police or a University of Phoenix campus security authority over the previous three years that occurred on campus, in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by the University, and on public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. If a crime has occurred but has not been reported, it cannot be reflected in the following statistics. For this reason, University of Phoenix encourages everyone to report all crimes to their designated campus security authority and local law enforcement agency.
Specific campus location statistics are available electronically at http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/ campus-safety/campus-crime-statistics.html or by requesting a printed copy from your local campus security authority. (Contact information can be viewed at http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/ campus_safety/campus_safety_contact_list.html) University of Phoenix expressly reserves the right to modify or to adopt additional campus policies and procedures relating to campus safety, at any time without notice.
Note: Please use the latest version of your Internet browser when reviewing the campus crime statistics.
Google Chrome is recommended.

Statement of Policy on Sex Offender Registration
The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act requires colleges and universities to issue a statement advising the campus community where state law enforcement agency information concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. The Act also mandates that sex offenders who are already required to register in a state provide notice of each institution of higher education in that state at which the offender is employed or is a student. This notice should be directed to the campus security authority at their campus.
To learn the identity of registered sex offenders on or near a campus, or anywhere in the United
States, visit the Sex Offender databases at http://www.sexoffender.com or http://nsopw.gov/.
You can search by city, county or ZIP code. This information is collected by other agencies, and this institution cannot guarantee this information is correct or complete. The information provided here is intended to be in compliance with the Clery Act and for campus safety purposes only. It should not be used to intimidate, threaten or harass. Misuse of this information may result in prosecution.

Florida Sexual Predator and Sexual Offender Registry
The University of Phoenix Campus Safety website at http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/campussafety.html provides a link to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) sexual predator and sexual offender registry website at http://offender.fdle.state.fl.us/offender/homepage.do and toll-free telephone number, 888.357.7332 (for TTY accessibility, dial 877.414.7234). These give access to Florida sexual predator and sexual offender public information, including a database to search for offenders employed or enrolled at Florida universities.

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Emergency Mass Notification Policy
Apollo Education Group (Apollo) and University of Phoenix (UOPX) have established an emergency mass notification process that includes emergency escalation processes, mass notifications and supporting systems. These processes enable Apollo and UOPX to contact or send notices, alerts or warnings without delay to employees, faculty and students in the event of an emergency, dangerous or otherwise high-risk situation at a UOPX site.
Apollo and UOPX maintain emergency management policies, procedures and systems to protect lives and property, and to continue necessary critical functions and essential services. An emergency is defined as a situation that poses an immediate threat to the health or safety of someone in the
University community at a UOPX site or that significantly disrupts programs and activities.
The Emergency Mass Notification Policy applies to all employees, faculty and students of UOPX in the event of an emergency, dangerous or otherwise high-risk situation at a UOPX site.
The policy can be viewed in its entirety in the Campus Safety Policies at http://cdn.assets-phoenix. net/content/dam/altcloud/doc/about_uopx/Campus-Safety-Policies.pdf or by requesting a printed copy from your local campus.

Campus Security Authority Contact List
University of Phoenix campus security authorities assist in the safety of the University community by serving as contacts for University security issues. A current list of security contacts can be viewed at http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/campus_safety/campus_safety_contact_list.html Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention
Drug abuse affects all aspects of life. It threatens the workplace as well as our homes, our schools and our community. The U.S. Department of Education requires institutions of higher education to implement a drug prevention and awareness program for their students and employees. University of Phoenix abides by federal Drug-Free Workplace and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act regulations regardless of individual state legalization.
Students are expected to conduct themselves ethically, honestly and with integrity as responsible members of the University’s academic community. Any member of the University community found consuming or selling alcohol and other drugs on University property, including attending class or meeting with campus personnel, is subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the University, depending on the seriousness of the situation. All alcohol and other drug abuse policies, prevention and referrals can be viewed in the Campus Safety Policies document at http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/campus-safety/campus-safety-policies.html Prohibition of Illicit Drug Use
The University community must adhere to a code of conduct that recognizes the unlawful manufacture, sale, delivery, unauthorized possession or use of any illicit drug is prohibited on property owned or otherwise controlled by University of Phoenix. If an individual is apprehended for violating any alcohol- or other drug-related law while at a University location or activity, the
University will fully support and cooperate with federal and state law enforcement agencies. The
University enforces a “zero tolerance” policy regarding underage drinking.
Underage possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages is not permitted on property owned or controlled by the University, and the state laws will be enforced.
Also, intentionally or knowingly selling, or intentionally or knowingly furnishing alcoholic beverages to persons under the age of 21, or to persons obviously inebriated, is not permitted on property owned or controlled by the University.

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Federal Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Violations
According to the Higher Education Act (HEA), students convicted for a drug offense that occurred during a period of enrollment while they were receiving federal financial aid may lose eligibility for federal aid. Federal aid includes Federal Pell and FSEOG Grants, Federal Work Study, Federal Perkins
Loans, Federal Stafford Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, Graduate PLUS Loans and other financial assistance.
The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) asks students if they have been convicted of a drug-related offense. If the student answers “yes” to the question, then he or she will be sent a worksheet by the federal processing center in order to determine whether the conviction affects eligibility for aid. Should the financial aid office be notified that a student has been convicted of sale or possession of illegal drugs, financial assistance will be suspended immediately. If a conviction was reversed, set aside or otherwise rendered invalid, it does not count. Convictions occurring during periods of non-enrollment also do not count. In addition, any conviction received as a juvenile does not count, unless the student was tried as an adult.
Failure to answer the question automatically disqualifies students from receiving federal financial aid.
Answering this question falsely could result in fines, imprisonment or both. More information about federal penalties and sanctions is located at http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ftp3.shtml

Penalties for Drug Convictions
If a student is convicted of a drug-related felony or misdemeanor that took place while her or she was receiving federal student aid, the student will become ineligible to receive further during a period of enrollment for which he or she was receiving federal student aid. If the student was convicted of both possessing and selling illegal drugs during a period for which the student was receiving federal student aid, and the periods of ineligibility are different, then the student will be ineligible for the longer period.
Possession of Illegal Drugs

• First offense: Loss of eligibility for federal financial aid for one year from the date of conviction.
• Second offense: Loss of eligibility for federal financial aid for two years from the date of conviction.
• Third offense and subsequent offenses: Indefinite ineligibility for federal financial aid from the date of conviction.
Sale of Illegal Drugs

• First offense: Loss of eligibility for federal financial aid for two years from the date of conviction.
• Second offense and subsequent offenses: Indefinite ineligibility from the date of conviction.

How to Reduce the Period of Eligibility or Regain Eligibility
The student may shorten the period of ineligibility by:
• Successfully completing an approved drug rehabilitation program that includes passing two unannounced drug tests;
• Passing two unannounced drug tests administered by an approved drug rehabilitation program; or
• Having the conviction reversed, set aside or otherwise rendered invalid.
The student may regain eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends.
Students denied eligibility for an indefinite period can regain it after successfully completing a qualified rehabilitation program, passing two unannounced drug tests from such a program, or if a conviction is reversed, set aside or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on the record (in such cases, the nature and dates of the remaining convictions will determine when the student regains eligibility).

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Students who regain eligibility during the award year should notify the financial aid office immediately so that they might receive any eligible financial aid which they are entitled to receive.
It is the student’s responsibility to certify that a rehabilitation program was successfully completed, as with the conviction question on the FAFSA, the University is not required to confirm the reported information unless conflicting information is determined.

Qualified Drug Rehabilitation Program
A qualified drug rehabilitation program must include at least two unannounced drug tests and must satisfy at least one of the following requirements:





Be qualified to receive funds directly or indirectly from a federal, state or local government program.
Be qualified to receive payment directly or indirectly from a federally or state-licensed insurance company.
Be administered or recognized by a federal, state or local government agency or court.
Be administered or recognized by a federal or state-licensed hospital, health clinic or medical doctor.

Convictions for Offense That Occurred During Enrollment
Federal regulations require an enrolled student convicted of a drug offense after receiving federal financial aid to notify Student Financial Services immediately. The student may be ineligible for further aid in that academic year and required to pay back all federal aid received after the date of the conviction. Student Financial Services will work with the student regarding all of the available options.

Institutional Sanctions for Alcohol and Drug Violations
Any member of the University community found possessing or selling illegal drugs on University property shall be subject to discipline on a case-by-case basis.
• Discipline will be based on the seriousness of the situation.
• A case may result in dismissal from the University.
• In all cases, the University will abide by local, state and federal sanctions regarding unlawful possession of drugs and the consumption of alcohol.
• Additional state penalties and sanctions may also apply.
• The University has adopted a zero-tolerance policy regarding alcohol and drug violations.

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...Studieportalen.dk? Klik her for at oprette en bruger. Kommentarer til Save as many as you ruin - Essay * Kommentar #1 12. oktober 2012 Af IsabellaFF Wow, hvordan er du blevet så god til engelsk? :) Hvis jeg må spørge - du må have et eller andet trick. :D ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst på formularen * Kommentar #2 24. november 2011 Af benjaminpetersen Fantastisk essay. Fortjent 12-tal. Grunden til at forrige kommentar, tror at du kobler det med Helligtrekongersdag, kunne være fordi at ordet "epiphany" både kan oversættes til førnævnte, men også betyde en slags åbenbaring. (Sudden realization) Men igen, super essay :) ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst på formularen vis/skjul svar * 01. januar 1 Af Longarm Tak Benjamin, - og skarpt observeret! Nu giver det mere mening. :) God weekend! * Kommentar #3 28. august 2011 Af Fiierne Virkelig flot essay. Noget jeg ikke helt fanger er hvordan du kobler det sammen med Helligtrekongersdag? ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst på formularen vis/skjul svar * 01. januar 1 Af Longarm Hvorfor skulle jeg det? :) Det må være en ekstra opgave i er blevet stillet :) * Kommentar #4 17. juni 2011 Af backus Et virkeligt velskrevet og rammende essay. ------------------------------------------------- Øverst på formularen Nederst......

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...paragraph. The idea is to allow the author to develop an argument and support it with ideas. • Stated first and last The topic sentence appears both at the beginning and at the end. It is a technique that is used by authors in cases where the content of the paragraph is complex. The topic sentence that appears at the end aims to remind the readers about the content in the paragraph so that they do not loose focus. • Stated implied This is a situation where an author states an obvious topic sentence to avoid being direct. In this case, the topic sentence is not conspicuous. The readers have to read in between the lines to identify the hidden topic sentence. 13. Paragraphs are the building blocks of coherent, authoritative and well-developed essays. An adequately developed paragraph should contain the following four details; Topic sentence This is a sentence that traditionally appears as the first sentence. However, the topic sentence could also appear at the end, in the middle, at the beginning and at the end or implied. It informs the reader the subject matter of the paragraph. The reader is in a position to internalize what to expect in the paragraph. In addition, the topic sentence substantiates the thesis statement. Conclusion This is a summarizing sentence that comes at the end of the paragraph. The sentence wraps up the argument developed in the paragraph and gives a summary. The conclusion helps the reader to connect the argument that is being developed and......

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...How to Write a Religious Studies Essay The first thing to understand when approaching an essay in religious studies is the unique nature of the discipline. Apart from its distinctive subject matter, the interdisciplinary nature of the field makes the study of religion both fascinating and highly challenging. The academic study of religion requires more than knowledge of individual texts, beliefs and practices, and may draw upon fields as diverse as history, sociology, anthropology, hermeneutics, and linguistics. For this reason, your instructors will expect you to familiarise yourself with and be able to employ a variety of different theories and methods. The interdisciplinary nature of the subject is also reflected in the various kinds of essays you will be asked to write, which may include a mixture of comparative, textual, ethnographic, hermeneutical, sociological and historical approaches. The academic study of religion takes place in a secular rather than a faith-based context. Since it aims to understand religion from a perspective that can be shared by all, and limits itself to evidence that is available to all, you will not be required to try to prove or refute particular religious beliefs. As an interdisciplinary academic subject, religious studies employs historical, textual, cultural, sociological and anthropological methods to contextualise, interpret and understand religious beliefs, practices, traditions and communities. As such, it is important......

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...HOW TO READ ESSAYS YOU MUST ANALYZE 1. Take a pencil in your hand. 2. Read the essay over once, quickly, looking for the main idea, for what the essay is about in general, and for what the author seems to be saying. Don't get bogged down in details. (If you come to an unfamiliar word, circle it but go on reading). 3. Check the meaning of unfamiliar words. If they seem to be key words, i.e., if the author uses them more than once, scribble a brief definition at the bottom of the page or at the end of the essay. 4. Now re-read more slowly and carefully, this time making a conscious attempt to begin to isolate the single most important generalization the author makes: his thesis. Follow his line of thought; try to get some sense of structure. The thesis determines the structure, so the structure, once you begin to sense it, can lead you to the thesis. What is the main point the author is making: Where is it? Remember, examples or "for instances" are not main points. The thesis is the generalization the author is attempting to prove valid. Your job, then is to ask yourself, "What is the author trying to prove"? Another way of identifying the thesis is to ask yourself, "What is the unifying principle of this essay"? or "What idea does everything in this essay talk about"? or "Under what single main statement could all the subdivisions fit"? If the author has stated his thesis fully and clearly and all in one place, your job is easier. The thesis is apt to be......

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...to write A Level Sociology Essay Assessment With reference to the present AEB syllabus, there are three main skills being assessed in your essays. 1. Knowledge and Understanding (9 marks) 2. Interpretation and Application (9 marks) 3. Evaluation (9 marks) What Does This Mean? What this means is that for writing an essay is that the content (studies, names of researcher, dates, figures, concepts, although important need to be organised coherently, applied to a variety of social situations and interpreted, and expressed in a critical fashion. You must be aware of the skills being highlighted in the question in order to use the appropriate skills in your essays. You should also practice writing essays regularly and develop a technique which addresses the skills required so that you can actually answer the question set. I hope that this handout should allow you to achieve this. Stage One Many students are too quick into diving into an answer. They have focused on certain key terms and ‘assumed’ what the essay requires from a quick look at the question. Instead, the question should be read a number of times. Task One With the title provided. Analyze the question by underlining the key features in the essay title Double underline the skills being assessed, e.g., describe and explain Identify any terms or concepts contained in the question. These terms will need to be defined, i.e. concepts such as interactionists. Essay questions will also......

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...Lindsay Apedaile Ms. Brown English 1020 2 November 2015 4.1 Ravisankar begins his essay by describing consumers and their want for low prices then describes sweatshops and their conditions. The problem he identifies is consumers demand lower prices to do this, corporations cut the cost on their employees either decreasing their wages or worsening their working conditions. Ravisankar assumes his readers are poor college students looking for lower prices and have a basic understanding of what a sweatshop is but does not fully know the appalling conditions of sweatshops. His purpose in this essay is to raise awareness of the degrading environment of sweatshops. In order to accomplish this purpose, he appeals mainly to pathos an appeal to emotions by mentioning how bad sweatshop working conditions are and its consumer’s. He also appeals to logos when he writes that people should have equal rights as others like pay. In this essay, Ravisankar addresses the main argument against his thesis the idea that the big companies like Nike, Reebox, and Gap are to blame for decreasing conditions in sweatshops. He refutes this argument by saying these companies are taking apart of “the race to the bottom” the pressure for low costs. Finally, he concludes by making the point that universities purchase around $3 billion in clothing with the universities name on it. This puts pressure on the companies to provide living wages and reasonable working. Overall, the argument Ravisankar makes...

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