Estore at Shell Canada Limited

In: Computers and Technology

Submitted By xuezhonglian
Words 700
Pages 3
eStore at Shell Canada Limited

Executive summary:

In 2003, Shell Canada Limited build up an e-Store developed from eCATS. The purpose was save cost and increase market share. However, it was not achieve the organization’s goal. The key issues are how to proving front and back end application, as well as promotion customer usage in e-Store.

Current Situation:

Shell had build up an e-Store that was an important company’s strategically project. Shell leveraged its international resources and took advantage of eCATS as the basis for the self-serve application, which reduced the development costs considerably. A success e-store could switch existing clients to a lean, faster e-commerce platform to achieve cost savings objective. However, e-Store could not reach an expected object because there is a few factors that effect both internally and externally application.
Internal issues arose from both business and IT:

• Inadequate training, communication, motivation to sales personnel
• Did not pay enough attention to users’ needs
• Lake of system integration (Front and Back)
• Security added barriers to inconvenient use of the site
• System performance (Order processing takes time)
• Difficult to use (SSO - single sign-on confusion)

External issues:

• Some customers never heard of e-store.
• Customers prefer to make deals through face-to-face or 1-800 line over internet
The major low usage could be related with system integration, internal and external communication and marketing campaign that required organization revamp in Shell downstream business strategy.

Local sales representative were lack motivation and inadequate training, some agents provide only minimal effort to promote eStore, they did not feel comfortable using the system and found it challenging to show their clients…...

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