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Ethical Theory Development

In: Social Issues

Submitted By ALTPRIDE
Words 19601
Pages 79
Effective Communication
Table of Contents

Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………..4
Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………5
Chapter One: History of Ethical Theory Development
Introduction……………………………………………………………………………….…6
Definition of Ethics
Business Ethics and Individual Ethics: Is There a Difference?…………………….…..7
Virtue Ethics…………………………………………………………………………............9 Practical Wisdom……………………………………………………………….14 Eudaimonia……………………………………………………………………...15 Kantian Ethics……………………………………………………………………16

Ethical Egoism…………………………………………………………………………….....18
Consequentialist Ethics.……………………………………………………………………..21
Chapter Two: Corporate Social Responsibility
Introduction 27
Corporate Social Responsibility 27
Summary 34
Chapter Three: The National Football League’s Blackout Policy is Unethical
Introduction……………………………………………………………………………….…35
The History of the NFL Blackout Policy: The Legal Test…………………………………..37
The Economic Test: Do Blackouts Have a Positive Economic Benefit?...............................39
The Philanthropic Test……………………………………………………………………….43
The Ethics Test………………………………………………………………………………47
Summary……………………………………………………………………………………..51
Chapter Four: Effective Communication
Introduction……………………………………………………………………………….....50
Effective Communication Defined………………………………………………………..…50
This Student’s Display of Effective Communication…………………………………….....51 Written Communication……………………………………………………………….…51 Verbal Communication……………………………………………………………….…53 Electronic Communication……………………………………………………………....53
Summary……………………………………………………………………………………..61
Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………62
References…………………………………………………………………………………….63

Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate this student’s understanding of the ethical decision...

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