Ethics and Legality in Classroom Management

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Submitted By jhollern
Words 1440
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Running head: ETHICS LEGALITY CLASSROOM








Ethics and Legality in Classroom Management
Jordan Hollern
GCU EDU 536
03/04/2012


Ethics and Legality in Classroom Management
A teacher must deal with disruptive classroom behavior throughout their career. To do so, they must not only develop their skills in handling these situations but also develop ethical standards for their classroom. These standards set forth by the teacher will help them deal with their students, those students’ parents, the school administrators and their community. There are numerous articles written that could help a teacher when researching any legal or ethical issues that may arise during their teaching career. This paper summarizes four peer-reviewed articles that address the legal and ethical implications for classroom management related to the rights and responsibilities of students, parents and teachers.
The first article under review is Public School Law-Teachers and Student’s Rights in which the legal rights of both the teacher and the students are defined. The article also includes the legal liabilities of the teacher in the classroom. The Negligent Tort Law states that a teacher may be held accountable by a court of law if he or she could have foreseen and prevented the injury by exercising proper care (McCarthy & Cambron-McCabe, 1992). The duty of the teacher in the classroom is to protect the students (McCarthy, et.al, 1992). The teacher must take all precautions to unsure that proper care and supervision is given to every student while in the care of the teacher (McCarthy, et.al, 1992). If an accident or injury occurs in the classroom but it could have been prevented or predicted by a member of the staff and proper supervision was overlooked, then the law declares that negligence has occurred (McCarthy, et.al, 1992). If an accident or injury does occur…...

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