Free Essay

Ethics in Criminal Justice

In: Other Topics

Submitted By BrooklynnsOwn
Words 3572
Pages 15
NORTHCENTRAL UNIVERSITY
ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET

Learner: LaChara S. Hill

THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETELY FILLED IN

Please Follow These Procedures: If requested by your mentor, use an assignment cover sheet as the first page of the word processor file. The assignment header should include the Learner’s last name, first initial, course code, dash, and assignment number (DoeJXXX0000-1) justified to the left and the page number justified to the right.

Keep a Photocopy or Electronic Copy of Your Assignments: You may need to re-submit assignments if your mentor has indicated that you may or must do so.

Academic Integrity: All work submitted in each course must be the Learner’s own. This includes all assignments, exams, term papers, and other projects required by the faculty mentor. The known submission of another person’s work represented as that of the Learner’s without properly citing the source of the work will be considered plagiarism and will result in an unsatisfactory grade for the work submitted or for the entire course, and may result in academic dismissal.

| | |
|CJ7011-8 |Gabriele Suboch |
| | |
|Ethics and Criminal Justice |Assess a Case Scenario to Foster a Culture of Ethics |
| | |

Faculty Use Only

Running Head: CASE SCENARIO

Assess a Case Scenario to Foster a Culture of E \LaChara S. Hill Northcentral University Ethics and Criminal Justice – CJ7011-8 Gabriele Suboch

December 6, 2015

Introduction The law enforcement officers, in particular the police, are governed by a set of rules that control their activity while on duty; such is to safeguard the rights of the public as well as their safety, and that of the police officer on duty. Law enforcement exists a job that requires men and women of integrity. In view of the fact that, the values and morals associated with the service, stands for what is rightfully protected by the constitution. During performance of their duties, police officers undergo tough conditions at the same time as upholding laws and maintaining order, making it difficult for some officers to behave and respond in ethical and just manners without error. The core function of the police force is to serve and protect, however, on some occasions society finds uniformed officers on the wrong side of the law, in which they swore to uphold and protect. Case Scenario In the case of the Fruitvale Bart Train Station shooting on New Year’s Day of 2009; involved an officer by the name of Johannes Mehserle and victim 22-year-old Oscar Grant. A case that sparked outrage nationwide; an unfolding that exhibited gross misconducts from a trained, regarded and respected police officer, against a citizen he had sworn to serve and protect. According to eyewitnesses Officer Mehserle shot 22-year old Grant while he was handcuffed, and before an on looking crowd that recorded the entire happening. Throughout this paper, this writer will analyze the aforementioned case, illustrate and/or highlight the unethical unfolding’s in which took place, make informed suggestions on the recommendations to minimize any reoccurrences’ of the same nature, and provide a reformed police code of ethics. Code of Ethics Police officers, not only in the United States but also throughout the world are believed to offer service to the people. Through ensuring that public security and safety is maintained and the rule of law is adhered to (Barker, 2011). In dispensing their duties, police officers are governed by a set of ethical codes and principles of behavior; the codes of ethics exists as: • Accountability: where every police officer is held responsible for his or her actions, omissions and decisions. Signifying that while on duty, the decisions he or she makes should be informed and within the provisions of the law. The actions taken to control a situation should be done so with respect to the constitutional rights of the public (Baker, 2011). • Fairness: police officers while carrying out their duties, are supposed to treat people with fairness despite their race, gender or even religious orientation; considering the fact that police officers are protectors of the law and respecters of unprejudiced public rights (Baker, 2011). • Integrity: each police officer is presumed to do the right thing, at all times, regardless of the matter at hand, those involved and any other influences. Officers are held to a higher lever of integrity and expected to perform above all else, at all times (Baker, 2011). • Leadership: which states that a police officer should constantly-continuously lead by example. Even in times of conflict, officers are expected to take a leadership role and guide the populace into conflict resolution (Baker, 2011). • Objectivity: denoting that police officers are obliged to make informed choices, be good judges of character, and respond based upon evidence and experience when making decisions (Baker, 2011). • Transparency: indicating that an officer on duty should be open in his or her action(s) and decision(s). While on duty, the rights of all citizens should be maintained and all rules enforced equally (Baker, 2011). • Respect: signifying that an officer should treat every person with respect, despite his or her age, gender and/or ethnicity. All citizens are protected equally under the constitution and should be treated in such fashion regardless of their status and/or association within society (Baker, 2011). • Selflessness: denoting that an officer should at all times act in a manner that reflects the best interest of the public. Actions that would be deemed as best fitting, while at the same time protecting and preserving the rule of law (Baker, 2011). The United States Constitution protects all citizens as well as police officers under the same rule of law, no one person is exempt. Police officers perform their duties under guided principles of behavior. These principles control and make clear how officers are required to conduct themselves while serving on or off duty. Such guiding principles are formulated to ensure that even as officers are upholding the law and controlling order, they too must also operate within the same provisions of the laws (Brannigan, 2005). A few guiding principles are: • Police Officers are allowed by the law to use force. However, the use of force is only allowed when necessary and to a proportionate amount. Force can only be used when the safety of others is at risk, the safety of the officer is at risk and/or a person resorts to force after a direct command to submit him or herself (Brannigan, 2005). • Police Officers operate under directives, within parameters, orders and instructions and exclusively carry out such in accordance of regulations that govern operations of the police force (Barker, 2011). Officers operate within guidelines that are lawful and do not put the safety of the public at risk. • Police Officers are obliged to treat all information with confidentiality, both during the course of and after investigation(s) (Brannigan, 2005). • The conduct of police officers ought to be of a desirable manner, whether on duty or off duty; with an aim of protecting the image of the police force and maintaining the confidence of the public (Brannigan, 2005). • Officers must be diligent when performing their responsibilities and duties, with the best interest of the public, without any dealings and/or participation in corrupt or unethical behavior that might jeopardize the officers’ livelihood or the force as a whole (Brannigan, 2005). Ethical Concerns Taking into account the above-detailed codes of ethics and principles, the slaying of Oscar Grant was a clear indication of gross misconduct and a obvious disregard of the rules and regulations that are set forth to control the operational actions and behaviors of those who are sworn-in to service. Oscar Grant was exploited and treated with the minimum amount of respect, when he was savagely killed before the public (Barker, 2011). Grant was mishandled from the start. While being apprehended he was placed to the ground by means of inappropriate and unnecessary force, and as reports state Mehserle’s partner is believed to have put his knee on the face of Grant once he was already on the platforms floor. Moreover, it is reported that Oscar never resisted arrest; instead he continuously demanded to know reasons for being apprehended. Sadly his demands fell on deaf ears as he was excessively forced to the ground, with his hands behind his back, shot and killed in cold blood. Not only a clear depiction of the officers’ lack of respect for the guiding principles of behavior and the US Constitution, but also an unconcealed disregard for human life. The officers’ actions reflected little regard for the image of the police force in which they service and represent, while acting in such a ruthlessness manner before the public that not only watched, but also recorded the incident. Once more, the aforementioned illustrates the deviation from the code of ethics by those we in-trust to serve and protect (Brannigan, 2005). How do you defend shooting an unarmed person, whom posed no threat to himself, the public or the officers involved? Such is not possible; hence the motive of the shooting remains undetermined. During the course of the investigation, it was also not established what the primary and/or justifiable reason(s) for the encounter. The officers, who are expected to act with due care and responsibility, provided little to no answers for their actions. The shooting showed lack of responsibility and failure to accept accountability. Sub Culture At the root of all deemed good and bad within our judicial system (e.g. law enforcement etc.) existent is a strong, deep-seated subculture that pervades many agencies. Despite the fact a universal belief in academic debate is that police culture is negative, allegiance above all else, rooted in pessimism, and an “us versus them” way of thinking; it has constructive aspects that are frequently go unnoticed (e.g. the bad at times outweighs the good. Members of law enforcement, corrections as well as the courts, subculture share morals and values that permit officers to endure what at times is a strenuous and emotionally taxing occupation. Principles such as supportiveness, empathy, solidarity, perseverance, and loving enable the discussed professionals to cope with associated concerns such as post-traumatic stress; these individuals are part of a team of coworkers whom genuinely tend to their colleagues (Perez, 2011). The backing received from one officer to the next is the result of shared morals within the culture. Officers who are plagued with/in grave situations are able to depend on their comrades as a result of known moral and values they believe their colleague(s) also possess. Morals and values such as camaraderie, courage, and sacrifice will encourage members to place themselves in jeopardy (Perez, 2011). Once more, on the contrary, loyalty to fellow coworkers cannot overpower your sworn duties. Police Officers are in a position where the lives of others must come before their own. The decision to stand by another officer can at no time come before and/or at the expense of a citizen. Advantages Ethical Pluralism, Over Ethical Absolutism and Ethical Relativism As mentioned in the Oscar Grant case, statistics show that many cases of police brutality and killings have not reached the justice department; which is said to be the result of the power the police force, having the ability to muffle such cases (Prenzler & Ransley, 2002). According to reports and studies, law enforcement officials are known to use means that are aimed at discriminating people who are willing to go forward to report cases of police misconduct and serious wrongdoings. Officials are said to threaten potential whistle blowers, using scare tactics such as conducting background checks to find any criminal offences and using them against the individual; planting evidence and in some cases threats of physical harm, all in an attempt to quiet the tattler (Prenzler & Ransley, 2002). The public has however lost confidence in the criminal justice because of the misconduct of the police. This is a major conflict brought about by the combination of different and distinct code of ethics and subculture the police are supposed to operate under. The theories of ethics and integrity are meant to strengthen communities through effective communication and reconciliation. These theories are fostered through training of police officers, they are; procedural justice, which is to ensure that during administration of a judicial process, the officers are to carry out adequate and sufficient investigation. By means of setting aside their personal emotions away from the investigations, and conducts an impartial process. All the evidence gathered is to be used without favor and justice is left to the court’s discretion. The police officers should also work towards reduction of bias treatment. Through performing their duties, not observing race, gender and religious affiliations. Police officers are human and from time, they might favor a party because they are of the same race or share a similar belief. The officers are also trained on ensuring racial reconciliation. This is through playing a leadership role while performing their duties, showing no favor for the same race and teaching the public on the importance of racial cohesion. Moral pluralism is the basic belief that every culture has a right to exist, be respected and protected by the law, and differentiates right from wrong with respect to every culture. It is based on a person’s individual judgment of what is morally right or wrong. Moral absolutism is the belief that one’s culture is the right culture and no other should exist, be respected or protected. Moral relativism is the belief that each culture is special in its own way and there is no right or wrong based on this assumption (Browning, 2006). The advantages of ethical pluralism over relativism and absolutism are that, judgment is based on an individual’s understanding of morality and respect for other cultures. It also creates room for reconciliation and accommodation for the beliefs of other people, based on religion, ideologies and political beliefs. Pluralism aims at saving the moral fiber of humanity with respect to the environment and other human ways of life. Another advantage is that it creates cohesion among different people, with diverse culture living together with respect for each other (Browning, 2006); which exists as the most important moral lesson of humanity. Respecting one another, despite the differences, supporting each other, peaceful interactions, and having a common set of rules to adhere to no matter the diversity. With specific regard to the to the Grant killing, when different people of diverse backgrounds come together for a common course; protesting what they all believe is wrong, no matter their diversity and speaking in one voice of condemning an act they all deem as a disgrace and disregard of human life. When a society stands together in defending what is morally right, it helps racial reconciliation, speaking in one voice and pushing towards the same goals. Moral pluralism is a belief that aims at promoting a sense of the world being a single unit despite the diversity in race, religion, culture and gender. All with respect for each other and treating a society as a unit and not grouping people based on superiority and minority. Applying Theory In the case of Oscar Grant, the misconduct of the police officers is best associated with the Rationale Choice Theory. Rationale Choice Theory explains that the action of an individual is based upon a variety of choices. An individual is placed within a multitude of courses of actions, and is to decide on which choice they are willing to settle with (Gilboa, 2010). In criminal offences such as in the case of Oscar Grant, police officers act in their own ill will, unlawfully and ill intended in deciding the choices they take to settle a conflict. Officer Johannes Mehserle had many choices on how to go about handling the situation of that fateful night. The first choice would have been to arrest Grant in the manner outlined, apprehend him and taken him to custody. Such action could have possibly changed the entire dynamics and saved the life of an innocent young man (Barker, 2011). Secondly, the two officers could have attempted to control the situation by dispersing the crowd, to allow them to work with a free space to make informative decisions (Barker, 2011). With a chanting crowd, the action of most police officers may be without clear thought as the officers are working to clear a situation in the shortest time possible. Lastly, the involved officers could have called for backup from assisting units around the train station, to help in dispersing the crowd, giving him time to investigate and make a personal judgment that is informed (Barker, 2011). Essentially, many choices could have been made, regrettably, Mehserle and his partner instead decided to use excessive force to constrain an unarmed civilian, treat him like an animal before public onlookers, and in the uncontrolled process drew a service weapon, and unjustifiably took Oscar Grants young life. Once more it is not clear whether the killing had existing factors that led to the decision of the officer drawing a gun to a defenseless civilian. The rationale choices of a police officer that made a wrong judgment led to the death of an innocent civilian (Barker, 2011). Recommendations With the increase in cases of unethical practices by police officers, many recommendations can be put in place to control the vice. As officers are also human and will at times make mistakes and bad calls, thorough training in emotional management is necessary (Perez, 2011). On a daily basis, police officers are put in different positions and situations that are life threatening or puts their emotions to the ultimate test. With many emotional discomforts, the officers can sometimes make poor judgment due to the trauma and such can lead to negative consequences (i.e. bad outcomes). Stricter rules should be put in place to handle the misconduct of officers who willfully engage in unlawful acts. These measures should be put in place to lessen and control the subculture of the police that is done with disregard for the interest of the public. The officers found culpable of these acts should face the law, as would any other citizen without the protection of the police force. Tough penalties should be introduced to punish those involved in illegal activities such as: corrupt dealings, witness interference and tampering with evidence (Perez, 2011). Such officers should be excluded from the force and face criminal charges as individuals and not as police officers. The aforementioned could reduce the ill conducts performed by rogue officers who use their uniforms as above the law super hero costumes. The referenced officers are the ones tainting the image of the police force, thus discouraging public confidence. Police officers should not be allowed to appear as witnesses in cases were their partners or close coworkers are defendants. The “blue line cop code” allows them to defend their colleagues, even with false information under oath. This will reduce the conflict between the normal code of ethics and the cop subculture. Special departments should be created to handle disputes between police officers and the public (non internal affairs). Particularly in cases involving judicial killings, police brutality, corrupt dealing and police involvement in criminal activities (Perez, 2011). This would be a good step towards restoring public confidence in the police force and assure citizens of protection when they want to forward significant information to the authorities. Improvement of working conditions and pay of police officers; providing money exists as the primary motive in corruption and wrongdoing. Higher wages for police officers could lessen if not eliminate illegal dealing that earned them an extra income. Assurance of good benefits of injuries acquired or deaths in line of duty, for both the cops and the families they leave behind (Perez, 2011). Officers feeling financially secure and safe, knowing that their welfare and that of their immediate family is well taken care of, they might operate with greater motivation and will to protect and serve wholeheartedly and ethically. Conclusion Police officers perform their duties under guided principles of behavior. These principles control and make clear how they are required to carry themselves while both on and off duty. The guiding principles are formulated to ensure that even as officers responsible for imposing the law and maintaining order, they must also operate within the same parameters. The public has however lost confidence in the criminal justice as a result of all the unprosecuted police shooting, beatings etc. The misconduct of police officers has truly weakened an already unstable system. To state that reforming ethical policy and guidelines will rectify the problem would be far reaching, however a small step in the direction of a larger victory. We must start someone and if the inception is at the very beginning of the prison system process (e.g. arrest, etc.), this writer will however state, it is a great move.

References

Browning, D. (2006). Universalism vs. Relativism: Making moral judgments in a changing, pluralistic, and threatening world. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield. Brannigan, M. C. (2005). Ethics across cultures: An introductory text with readings. Boston: McGraw-Hill. Barker, T. (2011). Police ethics: Crisis in law enforcement. Springfield, Ill: Chares C. Thomas. Gilboa, I. (2010). Rational choice. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press. Prenzler, T., & Ransley, J. (2002). Police reform: Building integrity. Annandale, NSW: Hawkins Press. Perez, D. W. (2011). The paradoxes of police work. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Cengage Learning Vadackumchery, J. (2002). Police criminology and crimes. Delhi: Kalpaz Publications.

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics

...Brooke Fritz Mini-Paper CCJS 380 5055 Ethical Behavior in Criminal Justice 3/24/15 Ethics Ethics is a very important subject that requires a lot of focus and attention in the criminal justice field. Police integrity and ethics is a crucial element to an efficient police agency. In every police agency, it is desired to have an environment which has effective partnerships between the police and citizens. Good ethics and integrity is so important because it is what builds trust within a community. Police leadership must be in the highest ethical standards if the agency wants to keep the public’s trust. In order to be successful at enhancing integrity and ethics within an organization, leaders must establish consistent ethical mentoring and role modeling. It only takes one single incident of unethical behavior to turn an admired police agency into one of the least-respected. Ethics is known to be the foundation of the criminal justice system. Ethics is what has developed the moral reasoning we use, how we define criminal activity, and what the society considers acceptable punishment. Ethics must be studied because the criminal justice system is the most effective and best operates in an ethical manner. It is important that we study ethics in criminal justice so that we know what should be done in different given situations. Ethics entitles doing the right thing, at the right time, for the right reason. That raises a common question, how are we supposed to know......

Words: 346 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Ethics in Criminal Justice

...Running head: ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 1 Facing Ethics in Criminal Justice Through a Christian Worldview Jordan Kopko A Senior Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduation in the Honors Program Liberty University Spring 2011 ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 2 Acceptance of Senior Honors Thesis This Senior Honors Thesis is accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduation from the Honors Program of Liberty University. ______________________________ Stephen Parke, J.D., L.L.M. Thesis Chair ______________________________ Charles Murphy, Ph.D. Committee Member ______________________________ Shelah Simpson, M.A. Committee Member ______________________________ Brenda Ayres, Ph.D. Honors Director ______________________________ Date ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 Abstract The purpose of this thesis is to express the need for young men and women in law enforcement to endure ethical dilemmas through a Christian worldview. Ethical dilemmas and moral struggles in the criminal justice field are described in detail throughout the thesis. In the decision-making process during an ethical dilemma, an officer with a Christian worldview should make better decisions with the added guidance from the Holy Spirit. This thesis delves into the different aspects of ethics including reasons why some police officers make immoral decisions. The ethical issues in criminal justice have been a problem in law......

Words: 8552 - Pages: 35

Premium Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics

...qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmrtyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmrtyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmrtyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmrtyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnmqwer...

Words: 691 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics

...Criminal Justice Ethics Paper Ethics - 232 September 28, 2013 Criminal Justice Ethics Paper A few months ago, a woman was brutally raped, beaten and left for dead. Since the attack she remains in a coma. This case has risen to national prominence as an example of how today’s youth no longer respects fundamental social values, television and video game violence has desensitized young men to the consequences of crimes such as assault and rape, and as a demonstration of the inability of the police to keep the streets safe for law-abiding citizens. My partner and I work in the criminal justice system as police officers and handle most of the homicide cases in our area. The publicity from this crime has placed our police department under pressure to send someone to trial for this crime immediately. A gang of young men were spotted in the areas where the victim was found assaulting and threatening people that were passing by. Two members of the gang were arrested. The two members are both male and 14 years of age that both have previous records of robbery and assault. Our obligation as police officers is to follow the policy and ethical standards of our police department and the law, which states, minors must be informed of their legal right to have their parents present during the interrogation and to use videotape during important interviews. However, my partner has pushed his ethical obligation aside and interviews both of the minors while deciding not to contact......

Words: 608 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics

...Criminal Justice Ethics Monica A. Stoddard Prof. Stephen Knights CRJ 410 June 10, 2012 Two of my most important values is integrity and honesty. Integrity and honesty go hand and hand. Without honesty there is no integrity. Integrity is doing the same thing whether you are in a group or completely alone; in other words, doing the right thing, all of the time, even if no one is watching.   Criminal justice integrity is especially important in police work. It is an essential value for officers to maintain even if they are trying to fit into the subculture of law enforcement. Much corruption in police departments has been the result of officers compromising integrity. These principles are important to me because as a criminal justice professional I am entrusted to do a job that may require little to no supervision. Another of my important values is honesty. Honesty is a very important part of our personal and professional lives. Being dishonest can break down relationships and harm the community as a whole. Honesty is also a major value in the criminal justice system. In order for the system to even work it must be based on honor and honesty. I will remain professional on and off duty. Some citizens have this idea that some criminal justice officials are crooked. Remaining professional while on duty is very important. No matter how an inmate or a probationer or parolee may act disrespectful, I must remain in control of the situation as to not get out of......

Words: 367 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics

...Ethics in Criminal Justice Ethical Dilemma 1: Gun Rally After receiving a tip regarding a possible unlawful rally being planned, you must decide what the proper course of action is, taking into account your personal support of the mission of the rally, and your duties and obligations to uphold the law. The proper course of action in this scenario is to assign a subordinate officer to identify the leader or the organizers of the event, and inform them of all of the permit requirements, local ordinances, and laws of the municipality which pertain to public gatherings. Ethical Dilemma 2: Chief’s Orders A decision was made to advise other police officers about the anonymous tip. The chief officer on duty advises you to take certain actions which you believe are improper and biased; you are faced with the dilemma of obeying what appears to be an unlawful order. This scenario requires you to balance between following the order of a superior officer, and performing your own duties in accordance with the oath you took upon being sworn as a police officer. The proper course of action is to do both; follow the orders to the extent that the rally is not allowed, and perform your duty as a public servant. Ethical Dilemma 3 : Accepting Favors You discover that an officer from a neighboring police agency you are assigned to work with accepts gratuities on a regular basis; the officer justifies his actions, citing an “agreement” with members of the public. You are......

Words: 431 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Ethics of Criminal Justice

...“Mill’s quote employs that distinction we made in Chapter 2 between values and goods that are intrinsic, and those that are instrumental. Recall that intrinsic goods are those things that are good in and of themselves or for their own sake; instrumental goods are those things that help us attain intrinsic goods. Thus, money is generally understood to be an instrumental good because its value lies in its ability to help us attain other things that are intrinsically good- by itself, money is of limited worth or utility. Happiness, however, is not a means to anything- we do not use it to get other things are desirable. Instead, we desire happiness because that state of being happy is, by itself, something we consider to be good. Knowing that happiness is the highest of the goods, we are in a better position to determine what constitutes good consequences, as well as what kinds of decisions and actions are morally permissible and desirable. Whereas happiness is intrinsically valuable, honesty, legal rights, and other moral values and principles must be thought of as valuable only instrumentally- only to the extent that they aid in realizing the ultimate goal of producing happiness. It may be the case that having legal rights aids in producing a more just society in which people are better able to pursue good lives. In this respect, legal rights may be morally desirable. However, the instrumental nature of legal rights also means that they can be trumped by other considerations......

Words: 1204 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Ethics in Criminal Justice

...Ethical Dilemma Andrew Cantrell CJA/324 Larry Avallone January 20, 2014   Abstract Ethical decisions and the way that the police department handle situations is an extreme issue. When an officer in the department is witness to brutality or unethical behavior it is their duty report the incident to the proper person within the department. Unethical Decision Made In July of 2007, Christopher Dorner was a police officer for Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD). At the time he was on patrol with a fellow female officer, Theresa Evans who was a veteran of the department. They received a call about a disturbance in a local neighborhood by a mentally ill man, Christopher Ghettler. During the arrest of Christopher Ghettler, Theresa Evans continued to kick the man twice in the chest and once in the face while he was being handcuffed. Christopher Dorner did not agree with the actions of his fellow officer and reported the actions that his fellow officer committed on this mentally unstable man. When it came time to write the report of the arrest on this man’s arrest, Theresa Evans requested that Christopher Dorner not report the brutality that took place during the arrest. With that request she was asking Christopher Dorner to be unethical and that became a serious dilemma for Dorner. Nature of the Dilemma He suppressed the information for two weeks, knowing that the LAPD had a “Blue Line” that he would cross if he went to authorities on the situation. The “Blue......

Words: 889 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics

...Why is the philosophy of community policing different than other police approaches? (2) How and why is it difficult to implement the philosophy of community policing? Remember, you must use at least one quote from the text in this assignment. Respond to at least three of your classmates. There are many different approaches when it comes to policing such as the watchman, legalistic, and service styles. There is also traditional, problem-oriented, zero-tolerance and community policing, which I will be addressing. Many people think of police as guardians of the community and although this may be true, not all police have the task of looking after the actual community. The array of job descriptions varies but all serve a purpose in the justice system. I will go over why the philosophy of community policing is different than other police approaches, why it is difficult to implement, the philosophy of community policing, and how it is similar to different types or styles of policing. According to Fuller (2014) “While the police have traditionally defined their primary mission in terms of crime control, community policing seeks to broaden the police role to include such issues as fear of crime, order maintenance, conflict resolution, neighborhood decay, and social and physical disorder as basic responsibilities”(p. 234). The philosophy of community policing is different than other police approaches because in this style of policing the officers are in touch with the......

Words: 937 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics

...govern the assembly of people for the purpose of holding a protest rally. A peaceful demonstration or assembly can be a productive way to express what we feel is wrong with our government. While such a protest is considered a part of our first amendment rights, most cities do require a permit in an effort to help avoid traffic and crowd problems. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees individuals the right of freedom of assembly. Under the Common Law and modern statutes, however, the meeting of three or more persons may constitute an unlawful assembly if the persons have an illegal purpose or if their meeting will breach the public peace of the community. If they actually execute their purpose, they have committed the criminal offense of riot. Even as a police officer you strongly support Article 2 of the Constitution. Which includes "the right of the people to bear arms." The U.S. Supreme Court stated that the militia reference doesn't limit arms to only law enforcement and the military. Most Americans have a constitutional right to own guns for the purpose of self-defense or certain legal activities, such as hunting or target practice. The fact if a rally does not have a permit as a police officer you need to advise your fellow police officers about the...

Words: 686 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Ethics in Criminal Justice

...Understanding that a well know criminal is in the district does not negate the fact that he too, as a citizen, is protected by the law. "Police officers must uphold the law regardless of the offender's identity" (Pollock, 2013, p. 115). As an officer of the law, it is their duty to enforce the law and protect the community from crime ethically. In situation two, if a known criminal was the victim, I would know the ethical decision would be to treat this criminal's case as fairly as anyone else’s. After reading this incident, it reminded me a of a First 48 case where a suspected murderer was murdered. Despite knowing that the victim had killed a man and a woman, the detectives investigated his murder as they would do anyone else’s. The fact is that every crime has a criminal behind them. That criminal needs to be prosecuted in order to bring justice to the victim and to protect community. This criminal who stole the lawnmower may move on to steal from someone else, or even commit a larger crime. Although it may seem foolish to protect a criminal, the minor criminal is still a victim of a crime. I would not attempt to provide unfair service to the minor criminal during this incident, as that would compromise my integrity as an officer. By ignoring this crime, as an officer, I would give the community mixed signals about what I am there to do. I should send the signal that I am there to enforce the law at all times. However, this would not stop me from staying vigilant to......

Words: 331 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Cja384 Ethics in Criminal Justice

...Cover (host, time, place): Ethics in Criminal Justice Attendees: Law enforcement officers, corrections officers, and professionals within the criminal justice profession. 5 areas of ethical conduct: 1. Proper use of professional and ethical authority It is common for criminal justice professionals to act beyond the limits of their authority. Proper training to help officers learn to control their actions and to uphold their reputation will reflect positively on the agency. 2. Racial Discrimination Both fellow employees and the community are affected by discrimination in law enforcement. Treating all individuals fairly and ethically will show proper professional behavior, and help them be a positive role model for the criminal justice system. 3. Bribes Unethical behavior included the acceptance of gifts for bribes from the community, agencies, criminals, or fellow co-workers in return for special treatment. 4. Honesty Trust is necessary for a positive professional relationship with the community. Immoral or deceiving actions cause a lack of trust in the criminal justice profession. Law enforcement officers are held to a higher ethical standard because of their role to keep the community safe. They take an oath of office, are expected to comply with professional code of ethics, and are subject to various laws, rules, and regulations (Gleason, 2006). 5. Excessive force Officers need to be able to think critically in stressful situations, and learn to......

Words: 561 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Ethics and Leadership in Criminal Justice

...Ethics and Leadership in Criminal Justice 1 Final Exam 1. Universal responsibility. I’d like to start out by defining the two.1. Universal-means of or pertaining to the universe, all nature, or all existing things. 2.Responsibility-to make one's actions and task their own, the willing acceptance of the consequences of my actions. Individuals, Institutions, Governments and International organizations make judgment about what is just and what is unjust based on a complex and general frameworks of moral and political values. These frameworks vary considerably across cultures and over time, but through the centuries prophets, philosophers and other intellectuals have repeatedly attempted to identify common ground that would allow all human beings in their own and in successive generations to agree on definitions of right and wrong, good and bad, just and unjust. By far the greatest single danger facing humankind – in fact, all living beings on our planet-is the threat of nuclear destruction. I would like to appeal to the leaders of the nuclear powers who literally hold the future of the world and their hands, to the scientists and technicians who continue to create these awesome weapons of destruction, and to all the people at large who are in a position to influence their leaders I appeal to them to exercise their sanity and began to work at dismantling and destroying all nuclear weapons, because we all know that......

Words: 953 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

The Criminal Justice Administration Analysis and Ethics

...The criminal justice Administration Analysis and ethics 484 4/20/2015 Dwayne Carr The criminal justice Administration Analysis and ethics Professional conduct and ethics are essential pieces, to the criminal justice administrations with ethics is defined what a person moral beliefs is right from wrong. The criminal justice administrations have to deal with a problem that are ethical on a daily basis and have to handle the ethical situation in behavior that is professional. The criminal justice administration and the law enforcement administration have a terrible time with professional conduct, and ethic’s particular matters might be hard to take on for the reason. Because of administration of criminal justice have a duty of creating moral decisions of what counts as right or wrong makes them have to be very professional. Also, employ critical thinking skill as well. Within this paper, it will analysis discuss, the critical thinking with the concerning association with ethics. In addition, professional conduct role with police officers, as well as the five areas of the ethical conduct, should communicate within the seminar. Also the reason to choice those areas and the suppose benefits, with the training for each the public and law enforcement. Professional Code of Ethic for Law Enforcement With the professional organization, concerning with certain parts of the law, medicine, also the criminal justice system as......

Words: 1288 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Criminal Justice Ethics and Cultralperspectives

...statement upon being questioned by an assistant district attorney later the same evening. Westover v. United States, the defendant was handed over to the Federal Bureau of Investigation by local authorities after they had detained and interrogated him for a lengthy period, both at night and the following morning. After some two hours of questioning, the federal officers had obtained signed statements from the defendant California v. Stewart, the local police held the defendant five days in the station and interrogated him on nine separate occasions before they secured his exculpatory statement. State v. Miranda, 401 P.2d 721 (Ariz. 1965) (Arizona, 1965) in this appeal the defendant brought up several points of law: Rule 236, Rules of Criminal Procedure, 17 A.R.S. (1956); His case did not go to trial in a timely manner. He thought there were objectionable,...

Words: 957 - Pages: 4