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Eugenics

In: Social Issues

Submitted By jaimegreen94
Words 621
Pages 3
INTRO
Laura Hix explains that ”The term eugenics as it pertains to humans was first coined in 1883” Eugenics got a bad name back in the times of WWII when the idea of it was turned into something negative by the Nazis. After this time mot people thought it was a bad thing or bad idea, but over time, it actually turned into something miraculous. People are on the fence about if it I right or not to alter your baby, but I believe eugenics should be viewed in a positive light. If parents want to give their child the best life possible, then why shouldn’t they.
BODY
A. The word Eugenics was derived from Greece. For thousands of years it was just used for altering crops and livestock to get a good harvest or big cow. 1883 was when the term started referring to humans. Eugenics became popular in early 20th century. The experimenting and testing was going in good direction until the idea of it was turned into justifying genocide. In the present, this procedure is used safely and effectively for positive outcomes. So if parents want to alter genes to make the baby healthier or if they just want to pick eye color, they should be able to.
While I do feel there is no reason to not have the procedure for the betterment of your child, I do feel its not fair to claim that it is right and that's that.” “ Many peoples opinions about this are effected by religion and morals and who am I to say that they are wrong. Although it is very safe and advanced, there is a risk that things could turn out not how the parent expected. People believe that babies should be how god intended, and there is nothing wrong with thinking like that.
C. although many people believe this procedure is unethical, and there opinion is just as valuable as anyone elses, it is no less ethical to alter your childs genes than to choose a religion or have them play sports. Its parenting and decisions that make the child who they are, so it is not different from choosing genes to effect the turn out of the child.” “ D. From eye color to height, if there is no coercion or compulsion to alter the baby, its the parents choice to do as they see fit. If they have the money and truly want to do it. They should alter whatever genes they want.” “
E. There is 2 different types of eugenics or genetic engineering. Positive and negative.” “. This technology is becoming more and more advanced. This can truly benefit our future generations. Scientists are currently working on new gene therapy techniques that can potentially modify embryos to the point that even their future progeny will have the same outcome. This advance can potentially completely rid the world of downs syndrome and other disease like it. “ “
CONCLUSION
A. This issue continues to be a conflict in todays society. Some people have very strong beliefs, and some people are on the fence about it. Opinions are swayed very easily by things like friends, media, and religion. There are no laws against it and it has been around for so long that I do not think it will end any time soon. If parents of a child want to make sure there baby wont have a disease, or if parents have the money and want to alter something such as the height of their child, then they legally can and should do whatever they feel. Eugenics is only going to get more and more developed over time and I believe that this can truly make an impact on our world.” “

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