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Euro-and-Greece-Explained

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Moastaaa
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Chapter 1: Executive Summary
This policy paper has been conducted for Catherine Ashton a European Commissioner who took over from Benita Ferrero-Waldner as the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and
Security policy (Also known as the High Representative), responsible for negotiating on behalf of the member states regarding foreign policies.
The paper aims to provide evidence to support facts that the further emergence of China, may threaten the Economic Competitiveness of the European Union. In order for China and the European
Union (who are big players within the global market) to form a relationship under the process of globalisation, there are steps that are needed to allow this to happen.
Example 2
4
Chapter 2: The further emergence of China and the Economic
Competitiveness of the European Union
‘Trade between the European Union and China has been growing dramatically, and China is the second trading partner of the European Union consequently displacing the United States of America as the main source of European Union imports, increasing by around 16.5% a year between 2004 and
2008’ (Nello, 2012).
In 2010 China became the main exporter of the world (Nello, 2012) overtaking Germany and the
United States. The export to the European Union consisted of mainly industrial goods such as machinery and transport equipment.
‘China surpasses United Sates as European Unions top trade partner: MOC’ was the headline by
Danlu (2011) from China News. This shows that China has not only become a major player with regards to the European Union, but also the number 1 player in the market.
2.1: Trade deficit, biased trade practices, and further challenges
‘OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries drive the global economy’ (European Commission, 2007). These mainly include, the United States of America, Japan,…...

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