Evaporation

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Evaporation Science Fair Research Paper By: Suzie Science Ms. Willis’ Class December 16, 2008 Background Information Liquids are all around us. Every day we drink and eat items that contain liquids, we use liquids to clean ourselves and our belongings and liquids can even be found in the places that we would not expect, like televisions. When someone watches liquid over time, an interesting thing begins to happen. The liquid will slowly start to disappear. The formal term for the liquid disappearing is evaporation. According to Asminov, Liquids are a state of matter that will take the shape of the container that is holding it (Asminov, 2008). There are three common states of matter. These states of matter are liquid, solid and gas. To transform a liquid into a gas you would typically apply heat, however, liquids will also become a gas over time. This process is called evaporation. Evaporation is defined by Gorin as the “conversion of a liquid substance into the gaseous state” (2008). Gorin continues by explaining that liquids can evaporate at room temperature as well as when they are heated. This knowledge led the writer to wonder if liquids evaporate at different rates. After observing liquids evaporate I began to wonder what affects the evaporation of liquids. Research question The research question that this project focused on was: What liquid will evaporate the fastest, Kool-Aid, Coke, Apple Juice, or Orange Juice?
Comment [m3]: Exactly from research plan. Comment [m1]: Create a Title Page with this information Comment [m2]: Write background information here. Include all key words and any research you did to better understand your topic. Include the definitions of any important words that you needed to know in order to design the experiment.

Hypothesis The hypothesis of the researcher is: If the rate of evaporation is related to the thickness of the liquid…...

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