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Evolution of Cognitive Psychology as a Discipline

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Evolution of Cognitive Psychology as a Discipline PSYCH560/Cognitive Psychology December 3rd 2011

Evolution of Cognitive Psychology as a Discipline
Cognition
Cognition is typically referred to as the procedure of obtaining, retaining, using and applying information or knowledge. It can sometimes be defined as the science of knowing. Cognition “refers to all processes by which the sensory input is transformed, reduced, elaborated, stored, recovered, and used” (Neisser, 1967). When defined broadly, cognition includes the processing of emotions; however, if defined narrowly, it excludes emotion processing. Cognition includes all the mental processes. For example, attaining knowledge and understanding, thinking, remembering, assuming, perceiving, judging and even analytical problem-solving are all part of cognition.
Given such a comprehensive definition, it is evident that cognition is concerned in everything a human being might probably do; every psychological experience is a cognitive experience. However, although cognitive psychology is related to all human activity rather than a few segments of it, the apprehension is that it is from a specific point of view yet other viewpoints are evenly justifiable and essential.
The Interdisciplinary Perspective & Emergence of Cognitive Psychology
As well as being part of psychology as a whole, cognitive psychology is also part of the more general interdisciplinary subject of cognitive science. Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary study of psyche and intellect. It embraces a number of fields such as philosophy, artificial intelligence, psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, and anthropology.

These other disciplines have had a large influence on cognitive psychology as did cognitive psychology have on them. Behaviourism was the leading approach within...

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