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Examining Arguments

In: English and Literature

Submitted By ladysilver
Words 649
Pages 3
Examining Different Arguments
Pamela C Purvis
HUM/111
July 29, 2012
Jennifer L. Bingham, JD

Examining Different Arguments

Title | Examining Different Arguments Related to the Choice of a Career |

Assessment Part A: Critically Evaluating an Argument | Build your mindmap. | Arts and Sciences (Advantage): Lots of flexibility in career choices: Logically Sound | Arts and Sciences (Disadvantage): Leads to a career in food service - 'Do you want fries with that?': Irrational Appeal | Education (Advantage): The best way to make a difference in the world: Either/Or Thinking | Education (Disadvantage): Guaranteed low paying job: Overgeneralization | Nursing (Advantage): People always will need nurses: Logically Sound | Nursing (Disadvantage): Too much schooling (according to Theo, the Law student): Overgeneralization | Information Systems and Technology (Advantage): No other degree concentration is as innovative (according to Grace): Either/Or Thinking | Information Systems and Technology (Disadvantage): Too limited in scope for much advancement in business situation (according to Ritesh): Shifting the Burden of Proof | Business (Advantage): Infinite career options (according to Ritesh): Overgeneralization | Business (Disadvantage): Boring work, stuck behind a desk all day: Overgeneralization | Health and Human Services (Advantage): All the benefits of Arts and Sciences, but vastly more focused and relevant: Logically Sound | Health and Human Services (Disadvantage): Job options are all in very un-creative fields.: Overgeneralization | |

Assessment Part B: Articulating the Steps Involved in Evaluating an Argument | Write out the two most compelling arguments you heard that affected your decision. Next, list one that you heard that had a big logical error in it, but which you still...

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