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Examples Of Duality In Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde

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Words 592
Pages 3
Anmol Shah
Mr. Stovall and Mr. Chan
English 10
29 October 2015
The Duality of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde In the novella by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde portrays the duality of a human. Every human being has a good and bad side. In the novella, Dr. Jekyll is represented as a dualistic person. Dr. Jekyll is a good well-mannered scientist and conducts an experiment that brings out his evil side, Mr. Hyde. This tells the reader that every man has a bad side and one can be more in control than the other. In this case Mr. Hyde beings to corrupt Dr. Jekyll and causes major damage. Does Dr. Jekyll think of Mr. Hyde of himself or as another person? Should the blame of Sir Danvers Carew be Mr. Hyde himself or Dr. Jekyll? Dr. Jekyll believes that a man cannot ever be pure good, but he cannot avoid the evil.
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People will try to be as good as possible, but their bad side will always be present. As Jekyll talks about this, he explains that, “that a man is not truly, but truly two” (Stevenson 58). This also shows that every man has a good and bad but one is always more dominate. We see in the novel that his evil desires are causing Dr. Jekyll a lot of trouble and that the frequent transformations has caused a side effect of turning evil with consciousness. We discover that Dr. Jekyll is both evil and good but Mr. Hyde is pure evil. Then there is no way for Dr. Jekyll to strengthen his good side and this leads to the evil to take

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