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Examples Of Ethical Issues In Animal Testing

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Questions have arisen over the past few years about the ethical issues in animal testing. Yet, there are many discussions done on animal rights in the past decades. It is estimated that up to 50 million animals are used in research every year worldwide. The vast majority of procedures use mice and rats. Dogs, cats, horses and non-human primates are used in less than 1% of procedures whilst research on great apes has been banned in several countries...

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