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Exercise 1: Heirs to an Estate

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Exercise 1: HEIRS TO AN ESTATE

Skill 2-1: Recognize that before next week’s meeting, preparation is critical to success, and usually includes identifying all tangible and intangible issues that will be of interest to all parties, and then prioritizing those issues, making sure to include some throwaway issues. What preparations do you need to make before the meeting?
Preparation is first stage of negotiation process which starts with defining the key goals which means -what are the person’s expectations from the negotiation process? Also person involved in Negotiation process during preparation he should decide his or her BATNA- Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement. Identifying key issues in negotiation, setting priorities and developing support agreement for adopted position is also important parts of preparation before start negotiation with other party (Carrell, Heavrin, 2007).
In order to perform an activity in a proper way we need to have some sort of preparation for it. Preparation is a key for a successful negotiation activity. For negotiation very first thing we need to understand is if there is anything to negotiate or not (If we were to sit down… (n.d.).
For the preparation point of view before negotiations starts with my brother and sister I must have to look at the following things.
BATNA
Before the start of negotiation defining BATNA is important to make oneself in a strong position (Carrell, Heavrin, 2007). My BATNA would be to divide all the assets without dissolving them and make it as simple as possible.
Identify key issues
There are several key issues which we should go through during negotiation process. These issues are:
1-The main issue is that we have only 30 days to report our aunt’s attorney about the agreement.
2-We have to sell houses, art collection and car and then divide the amount equally between three of us...

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