Experiment on Food Test

In: Science

Submitted By kumari
Words 891
Pages 4
In this experiment I had to do a food test on a variety of foods such as Apple, Celery, Bread, Biscuit, Cheese, and Milk mixing or combining with the Iodine solution, Sodium Hydroxide solution and Copper Sulphate solution. From that It allowed me to see if there are any changes to the foods when adding the solutions. The most important part when doing this food test was I had to investigate it safely and efficiently followed by the health and safety rules so that I carry out my experiment in a correct way and therefore my results can be accurate enough.

I had to follow the health and safety rules as it was very important for me to follow them when doing the food test experiment. This is because I had to use some chemicals and solutions which sometimes can be allergic or harmful for some people. So in order not to over come any mistakes I had to wear protective glasses and lab coat. They were very important because one for the lab coat it protected if anything spill on the clothes then it will spell in the lab coat for the second one which is protective glasses it will prevent any spill to the eye as glasses are wore.

Equipment needed

Lab coat

Protective glasses

Lamp

Test tube rack

White tile

Filter paper

Method

1.Put a small amount of each of the food substances into a test tube, add a few drops of iodine solution and then record any changes. A blue/black colour indicates the presence of starch.

2. Put a small amount of each of each food substances into a test tube and add
approximately 2cm of sodium hydroxide solution. Then gently shake the test tube and
add two drops of copper sulphate solution. Record any changes. A purple colour or
mauve indicates the presence of protein.

3. Place a small amount of each of the food substances on a piece of filter…...

Similar Documents

Experiment on Food Test

...In this experiment I had to do a food test on a variety of foods such as Apple, Celery, Bread, Biscuit, Cheese, and Milk mixing or combining with the Iodine solution, Sodium Hydroxide solution and Copper Sulphate solution. From that It allowed me to see if there are any changes to the foods when adding the solutions. The most important part when doing this food test was I had to investigate it safely and efficiently followed by the health and safety rules so that I carry out my experiment in a correct way and therefore my results can be accurate enough. I had to follow the health and safety rules as it was very important for me to follow them when doing the food test experiment. This is because I had to use some chemicals and solutions which sometimes can be allergic or harmful for some people. So in order not to over come any mistakes I had to wear protective glasses and lab coat. They were very important because one for the lab coat it protected if anything spill on the clothes then it will spell in the lab coat for the second one which is protective glasses it will prevent any spill to the eye as glasses are wore. Equipment needed Lab coat Protective glasses Lamp Test tube rack White tile Filter paper Method 1.Put a small amount of each of the food substances into a test tube, add a few drops of iodine solution and then record any changes. A blue/black colour indicates the presence of starch. 2. Put a small amount of...

Words: 891 - Pages: 4

Social Experiment

...Round 1. Situation: 2 females, 1 target sitting at table eating food, mild discussion Flash mob hits possible taint on experiment Behavior contemplative slightly closed off protective stances have been taken Preening behaviors More preening behaviors Slightly warming up to him still guarded but relatively open Compliance More preening Nervous behavior twirling hair Open body posture Relaxing a little bit and laughing More nervous twitches Seem open to idea, and discussion has occurred post interaction Mission: Successful Time: 3:19 Round 2. Situation: 2 females Standing outside Einstein’s. Team Closed off a little Conference Nervous hand twitches Bringing up other guy Point to self Pointing to friend Friend opens herself up Preening behaviors Another joins Stated single, opening up in sharing personal life indicates relaxation Mission: Success Time: 1:12 Round 3 Situation: 2 females sitting and eating outside. Solo Making long eye contact Looking around for friend briefly Looking at his body language Self touch, bra straps Legs remained cross Genuinely humoring the situation Laughing when friends come back, covering her mouth and smiling Strong eye contact Closed off, hands remained in lap Genuinely wants to humor him Gets number, but associates with friend, looking her opinion Hands over phone without looking at him She stated she has a boyfriend Mission: Success (possible fake) 3:12 Round 4 Situation: Team. 2 females......

Words: 330 - Pages: 2

Science Experiment

...Science and Health V Third Quarter Experiment 1 Name: ___________________________________________________________ Score:________ Section: SRP / SCR / STA Date: July 3, 2013 I. Objectives: To discover how essential the functions of roots and stems are to plant growth – See more II. Materials: any white flower, scissors, water, plastic cup , Food coloring (red, blue, violet, and green) III. Procedure: 1. Fill four of the cups one-half full with water. 2. Add about 20-30 drops of food coloring to the cup of water (red, blue, and green). In this case, more food coloring is better. 3. Before placing any of the flowers in the cups of water, have an adult trim the stem of each flower at an angle to create a fresh cut. For cut flowers, it is important for the stem tubes to be filled with water. If air gets in the tube no water can move up the stem. 4. Place one freshly cut white carnation in the cup containing the uncolored water. 5. Leave it for 6-7 hours. 6. Then examine the whole plant carefully including the stems, leaves, buds, and petals. 7. Question: 1. What happens when you put flower in a colored water for several hours? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Why do girls menstruate? _______________________________________________________________________________ 3. How do roots and stem help the plants? 4...

Words: 345 - Pages: 2

Experiment

... Experiment # 1 Laboratory Regulations / Safety and Micropipetting Objectives: 1. To introduce students to lab safety and regulations 2. To introduce students to lab equipment 3. To teach students to use and calibrate micropipetters Materials: Micropipetters, beakers, distilled water and balance A. Introduction of lab safety and regulations. 1. General laboratory safety and regulations will be explained and emphasized. 2. Lab equipment will be introduced. B. Micropipetter Use and Calibration Background: Before you start any type of lab work, it is a good idea to check the accuracy and precision of the micropipetters that you plan to use. A very simple way to do this is by weighing the volume of water actually transferred by a micropipetter at a given setting. Water has a density of 0.9986 g/mL at room temperature, so you can use the mass of the water transferred to determine the accuracy of your pipetter (as long as your balance is reliable of course....), and by repeating the test several times, you can determine the precision of the micropetter as well. Procedure: 1. Using a balance capable of reading in milligrams or lower, tare a plastic weighing boat on the pan of the balance. 2. Set the micropipetter to its maximum capacity and carefully transfer that volume of distilled water to the weighing boat. 3. Repeat the operation at least four times, each time recording the weight of distilled water transferred. 4. Set the...

Words: 414 - Pages: 2

Earplug Experiment

... I chose to wear ear plugs for this assignment, which hampered my ability to function on a normal bases. This assignment or experiment thought me a lot about what someone with a hearing disability has to go through and the hardships one may have to deal with on not only day-to-day but hour-to-hour and even minute-to-minute. The amount of adversity one may have to overcome is enormous just to live a normal life. While I was wearing the ear-plugs, I noticed that it was difficult for me to comprehend in a standard or ordinary fashion. While I was talking to my friend about what class he had next, he had to use many hand gestures and “slow-motion” talking only for me understand a simple sentence. The amount of time and effort needed to realize and grasp a simple sentence can be gargantuan, and may be so time-consuming. I give a lot of credit to these people because if I had to deal with this on a daily bases I would be a hermit and rarely talk to anyone, simply because there would be more effort put into the conversation than the knowledge being taken out of the conversation. If I went outside, I feel like I wouldn’t care as much of what people thought of me, simply because the amount of visual impairment I’m exuding isn’t is as much as other disabilities. If anything, I would need a hearing aid and that’s the only thing people would see and judge me off of. I honestly don’t think people would stare. I’m explaining about people that are walking pass me down a...

Words: 422 - Pages: 2

Experiment

...Winkler test for dissolved oxygen The Winkler test is used to determine the concentration of dissolved oxygen in water samples. Dissolved oxygen (D.O.) is widely used in water quality studies and routine operation of water reclamation facilities. An excess of manganese(II) salt, iodide (I–) and hydroxide (OH–) ions is added to a water sample causing a white precipitate of Mn(OH)2 to form. This precipitate is then oxidized by the dissolved oxygen in the water sample into a brown manganese precipitate. In the next step, a strong acid (either hydrochloric acid or sulfuric acid) is added to acidify the solution. The brown precipitate then converts the iodide ion (I–) to iodine. The amount of dissolved oxygen is directly proportional to the titration of iodine with athiosulfate solution.[1] Today, the method is effectively used as its colorimetric modification, where the trivalent manganese produced on acidifying the brown suspension is directly reacted with EDTA to give a pink color.[2] As manganese is the only common metal giving a color reaction with EDTA, it has the added effect of masking other metals as colorless complexes. History The test was originally developed by Ludwig Wilhelm Winkler, in later literature referred to as Lajos Winkler, while working at Budapest University on his doctoral dissertation in 1888.[3] The amount of dissolved oxygen is a measure of the biological activity of the water masses. Phytoplankton and macroalgae present in the water mass-produce...

Words: 1310 - Pages: 6

Experiment

...Experiment 6 Newton’s Second and Third Laws PHY 2091- 01 Experiment Performed : 03/2/15 Report Submitted : 03/20/15 Lab Partner: Nicholas Bautista Instructor: Introduction The experiment determines newton’s second and third laws using real life experiments such as the mass pulley system using the Atwood’s machine and using springs (2) in series and parallel to determine their spring constants and extensions when a mass is hanged from them. Newron’s second law states that the force on an object is directly proportional to the rate of change of momentum, which later gives the formula F =ma , m= mass and a is acceleration. Newton;s third law suggests that every action occurring on an object has an equal and opposite reaction when they occur in pairs, are acting in opposite directions and has same magnitude. In part one, we measure the acceleration of the mass pulley system using the photo gate. Data M1 = 151.25 g M2 =171.25 g Mean acceleration = 0.5992 m/s^2 Standard deviation 0.05463 Data Analysis Part 1 (Atwood’s Machine) – Formula and calculation of theoretical acceleration (ath) – A =(m1-m2)/(m1+m2) * g , ath= (0.17125-0.15125)/( 0.17125+0.15125)* 9.79 = 0.6083 m/s^2 % error = 0.05463/0.5592 *100 =9.76 % Formula and calculation of percent difference between ae and ath – % difference = (difference / A_th) *100 = (0.55992-0.6083) /0.6083 *100 =8.01% Part 2 (Springs in Series) – Hooke’s law equation...

Words: 793 - Pages: 4

Food Test

... ensure this. We can begin by taking interest in the place from where we buy our food ingredients, for example, is it from a reputed shop or retailer, we need to check out. We also need to check if these outlets are regularly checked by food inspectors and if the premises are kept clean with no infestations. We need to check if the packaging is intact, as also the expiry date and the source of the product. It is also necessary to talk regularly to the local community to check if people are falling sick after eating in a particular restaurant or food ingredients bought from a particular retailer. We should also create awareness in the local community on the ill effects of food adulteration so that when it happens the public knows when to seek help. We need to remember that contamination could happen in very small amounts over a period of time and it might be impossible to detect or too late to intervene. So it is prudent that every one of us takes special interest in this subject and educate our families, friends and colleagues about this menace. (The author is a consultant colorectal surgeon at Apollo Hospitals, Chennai. He is the lead clinician in the department of colorectal surgery and super specialises in surgical management of the diseases of the colon, rectum and anus)...

Words: 701 - Pages: 3

Experiment

...EXPERIMENT 11: DETERMINATION OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN A WATER SAMPLE (WINKLER METHOD) INTRODUCTION In an alkaline solution, dissolved oxygen will oxidize manganese(II) to the trivalent state. 8OH-(aq) + 4Mn2+(aq) + 2H2O(l) --> 4Mn(OH)3(s) The analysis is completed by titrating the iodine produced from potassium iodide by manganese(III) hydroxide. 2Mn(OH)3(s) + 2I-(aq) + 6 H+(aq) --> 2Mn2+(aq) + I2(aq) + 6H2O(l) Sodium thiosulphate is used as the titrant. Success of the method is critically dependent upon the manner in which the sample is manipulated. At all stages, every method must be made to assure that oxygen is neither introduced to nor lost from the sample. Furthermore, the sample must be free of any solutes that will oxidize iodide or reduce iodine. Chemicals: Manganese(II) sulphate solution – prepared by dissolving 48 g of MnSO4.4H2O in water to five 100 cm3 solution; alkaline potassium iodide solution—prepared by dissolving 15 g of KI in about 25 cm3 of water, adding 66 cm3 of 50% NaOH, and diluting to 100 cm3; concentrated sulphuriv(VI) acid; 0.0125 M sodium thiosulphate solution; starch solution (freshly prepared). Apparatus: 250 cm3 volumetric flask, 250 cm3 conical flask, measuring cylinders, titration apparatus, magnetic stirrer Procedure: 1. Use a 250 cm3 volumetric flask to collect water sample. Fill the flask completely with water without trapping any air bubbles. 2. Add 1 cm3 of manganese(II) sulphate solution to the sample using a...

Words: 538 - Pages: 3

Experiment

...Title Identification of Unknown Carbohydrate Solution and Investigation of Action of Saliva and Hydrochloric Acid in Carbohydrate Solution at Two Different Temperatures Objective To investigate the action of saliva and 3 hydrochloric acid in two carbohydrate solution Apparatus Boiling tubes, Metal test tube racks, Water bath, 37-40 Degree Celsius, Water bath, 90-95 Degree Celsius, Beaker, Dropper, Wooden Holder Materials Carbohydrate solution A , Carbohydrate solution B , Benedict’s solution , 3 M Hydrochloric acid, 3 M Sodium Hydroxide Procedures 1. Two boiling tubes are filled with 1 ml solution A and 1 ml solution B respectively. 1 ml of Benedict’s solution is added into each test tube. Both tubes are heated together in the hotter (90-95°C) water bath in two minutes. The results are recorded in Table 1. 2. A few drops of fresh solution A and B are spaced separately on a white tile. I2/KI solution (iodine) is added 1-2 drops on each solution. The solution is mixed with a glass rod on the tile. The observations are recorded in the Table 1. 3. 2ml solution B is added into each of four test tubes and the tubes 1, 2, 3, and 4 is labelled respectively with labelling paper near mouth of tube. 4. Tubes 1 and 2 is placed in a water bath of 37°C. 5. A measuring cylinder is salivated till it reached 5ml. 6. 2ml of saliva is added into tubes 1 and 4. The contents of the tubes are shaked well to ensure thorough mixing. 7. 4ml of HCL is...

Words: 481 - Pages: 2

Experiment

...Practical 5 Investigation of Action of Saliva and Hydrochloric Acid in Two Carbohydrate Solutions __________________________________________________________________________ Objective: Students are expected to state the objective of this experiment. Apparatus & Equipments: Boiling tubes Graduated plastic dropper Metal test tube racks o Water bath, ~ 37 C Beaker o Water bath, ~ 95 C Materials: Carbohydrate solution A 3 M Hydrochloric acid Carbohydrate solution B 3 M Sodium hydroxide Benedict’s solution Procedures: 1. Prepare two boiling tubes containing 1 ml solution A and 1 ml solution B respectively. Add 1 ml o Benedict’s solution to each tube. Heat both tubes together in the (~95 C) water bath for two minutes. Record the results in table 1. 2. Add a few drops of fresh solution A and B separately spaced on a white tile. On each solution, add 1-2 drops of iodine solution. Mix with pen cover. Record your observations in the table 1. 3. Pipette 2 ml solution B into each of four boiling tubes. Label the tubes 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively near mouth of tube. Label your group name. 4. Place tubes 1 and 2 in a water bath of ~37 C. (It doesn’t matter how long you put it in at this stage as no saliva or HCl have been added yet). 5. Salivate into a small beaker till it reaches about 5 ml. 6. Step (6) and (7) is to be done approximately at the same time. Measure out 4 ml of the saliva prepared in step (4) and pipette...

Words: 930 - Pages: 4

Herbicide Experiment

... the plants used in the experiment. For nearly 3 billion years life remained in constant development in the water, however it was when Plantae evolved that life on earth was forever changed. The first plants evolved about 470 million years ago, tracing back to a lineage of multicellular green algae. It was the migration of algae from water to land that kick started the colonizing of land-dwelling organisms. Plants can be classified as multicellular autotrophs that use chloroplasts in order to photosynthesize. The process of photosynthesis occurs in the leaves, utilizing sunlight as the initiator for the formation of sugars from carbon dioxide and water molecules, and results in the release of oxygen gas into the air. Today, there is a wide range of diversity in the plant kingdom (Singh-Cudy 55). About 365 million years ago gymnosperms evolved, which later became the first plants to evolve the seed, which consists of the plant embryo and an encased supply of stored food. During the early stages of growth the seedling relies on the food storage as it’s main source of nutrients until it is large enough for its own leaves to begin making food through photosynthesis. The seedling’s roots burry down into the soil in order to anchor the new plant into its new source of water and minerals from the soil (Singh-Cudy 61). As soon as the seed begins to germinate we can identify if a plant is a monocot or a dicot. A monocot has only one seed leaf, which is usually long and thin...

Words: 999 - Pages: 4

Experiment

...Experiment 1 Title: Standardization of potassium permanganate solution by ammonium iron (II) sulphate Name: Toh Zi Xin Name of partner: Wong Jing Hui, Gan Chun Yiang, Wong Teck Jun Date: 17.6.2015 Lecturer: Dr. Neo Kian Eang Practical class: P4 Introduction: Potassium permanganate solution can be standardized by titration against a standard solution of ammonium iron(II) sulphate solution. This is an example of standardization, which is a process to determine the concentration of a solution by using it to titrate another solution which have a known concentration. This titration is known as redox titration as the titrant, which is the potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizing agent. The ammonium iron (II) sulphate solution is measured by using a pipette and transfer it into a conical flask while the potassium permanganate solution is placed in a burette. The ammonium iron (II) sulphate solution is made acidic by adding dilute sulphuric acid. Potassium permanganate solution is dark purple colour because of the presence of permanganate ions, MnO4- . Since potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizing agent, it can oxidizes iron(II) ions to iron(III) ions. Fe2+ Fe3+ + e- On the other hand, the Mn7+ ions of the dark purple colour permanganate ion, MnO4- are reduced to colourless Mn2+ ion. MnO4- + 8H+ + 5e- Mn2+ +4H2O As a result, the overall ionic equation is: MnO4- + 8 H+ + 5 Fe2...

Words: 2374 - Pages: 10

Science Experiment

... = ±30mm * Percentage * 30617+ 30212÷2 × 100≈10% (1sf) Processed data – 10% 1f=1u+1v | 1u | 1v | 0.00500 | 0.00162 | 0.00455 | 0.00221 | 0.00417 | 0.00254 | 0.00333 | 0.00342 | 0.00250 | 0.00413 | 0.00200 | 0.00471 | Calculations (processed data): * u=200 * 1u = 1200=0.00500 * v (average) = 617 * 1v = 1617=0.0016207… ≈ 0.00162 (3sf) Graph: The axes were chosen in accordance with the Thin-Lens Formula: 1f=1u+1v. With these axes, the y-intercept (and x-intercept) will be equal to 1f and therefore, the focal length (f) can be found. Y-intercept 1f = 0.0067 (equation) ∴f=10.0067=149.25…≈149 (3sf) Conclusion: First of all, we see from the graph that 1u and 1v are inversely proportional to each other. Furthermore the value of the focal length, 149 mm, was obtained from the y-intercept of the line of best fit, when the correct value for the focal length on the lens packaging was 150mm. Even though, our result is quite accurate, the systematic uncertainties were still calculated to give an uncertainty of 10%. This means that the focal length could range from 135 to 167 mm (maximum and minimum error bars at y-intercept). Looking at the graph, we also see that no major random errors have occurred during our experiment, as there are no anomalies. Evaluation: Because the value obtained from the graph turned out to be accurate to the real value of the focal length, we can conclude that the procedure used was......

Words: 893 - Pages: 4

Experiment 2

...ABSTRACT Reaction time is one of the important methods to study a person’s central information processing speed and coordinated peripheral movement response. Simple reaction time is usually defined as the time required for an observer to detect the presence of a stimulus. The main purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a significant relationship between distance and the reaction time of an individual to light whereas distance is the independent variable and RT is the dependent variable. There were two participants involved in this study; the subject and the experimenter. The students were instructed to pick a laboratory partner and test how fast the participant will tap the table or chair as soon as he/she sees the light flashes while the experimenter holds it and the stopwatch to record the reaction time within the distance of 20 and 30 feet with 10 trials each. Based on the results made by an 18 year old female subject, there were minimal differences on 20 ft and 30 ft but it was not enough to conclude that there is a relationship between distance and reaction time. Therefore, the hypothesis was proven to be precise by the data that was collected. However, there are some indications that affect the delay in reaction time of an individual such as: age, gender, predictability, preparation, and other external factors. INTRODUCTION Reaction is a purposeful voluntary response to an external stimulus. From the start of the experiment, the experimenter...

Words: 1352 - Pages: 6