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Factors Affecting the Academic Performance of Students at Risk with Learning Disabilities: Basis for Designing a Supportive Classroom Environment

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Submitted By Jasblowitoff
Words 498
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The main purpose of this study was to determine the specific learning disabilities, level of self efficacy , self esteem multiple intelligences, parent and teacher’s involvement of students at risks with learning disabilities and their relationships to academic performance of high school students at risk with learning disabilities in order to design a supportive classroom environment for these children.

This study was based on the theory that academic performance of students at risk with learning disabilities is dependent on the self-efficacy, self-esteem, multiple intelligences and parents and teachers’ involvement. The self-efficacy includes general self efficacy and social self efficacy. The multiple intelligences includes the Linguistic Intelligence, Logical-Mathematical Intelligence, Bodily Kinesthetic Intelligence , Musical Intelligenc, Interpersonal Intelligence , Intrapersonal Intelligence , Spatial Intelligence , and Naturist Intelligence. This study hypothesized that there is significant relationship between self-efficacy, self-esteem, multiple intelligence, parents and teachers’ involvement to the academic performance of students at risk with learning disabilities.

Abstract Category: Education
Course / Degree: Ph.D. Mgmt
Institution / University: Capitol University, Philippines
Published in: 2011
The research design was descriptive using cross tabulation technique. The study was conducted at GCCNHS, Gingoog City . The respondents of the study involved the thirty four ( 34 ) students at risk with LD. Five ( 5 ) sets of questionnaires were being administered to gather the needed data such as the Self efficacy Scale, Barksdale Self-esteem Evaluation Index ( SEI), Multiple Intelligence Developmental Assessment ( MIDAS) and Parent Involvement Checklist. Each questionnaire has undergone the test of validity and reliability. The statistical tool used were frequency, percentage, weighted mean and cross tabulation analysis.

It is concluded that most of the second year students at risk with learning disabilities have mild dyslexia, mild dyscalculia and mild dysgraphia . These students have suffered low general self efficacy, low and lack of social self efficacy and all of them have lack of self –esteem. Each of these students possesses different types of intelligences and although the said intelligences are low still, none of them has linguistic and logical intelligences and most of them have average general academic performance. The general self –efficacy and social self efficacy, self esteem, multiple intelligences do not significantly affect the academic performance of the students. However, teachers' support and attitude affect much to students' academic performance. While there is a low correlation between parents involvement and general self –efficacy and between parent involvement and multiple intelligences, the kind of parental involvement of the students do not affect the social self efficacy, self esteem, and academic performance of the students.

From this conclusion, the supportive classroom environment intended for students at risks with learning disabilities are consist of the following; knowledge about LD, establishing learning centers like reading centers, writing/ spelling centers, multiple intelligence centers, parent involvement nook, teachers’ attitude, academic performance update, remedial reading intervention, accommodations and classroom size. With the right interventions in reading with parents, teachers and administrators’ support, these children with LD can succeed in their lives and become worthwhile individuals in the community and country.

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