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Federal Death Penalty Law

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Federal Death Penalty Law

Death penalty is advocated for by the state legislature or congress in cases of murder and certain capital crimes. A ruling from the Supreme Court rules that the death penalty does not violate the Eighth Amendment’s ban regarding unusual and cruel punishment. However, the Eighth Amendment shapes the procedures to be employed by the jury regarding the use of the death penalty. According to the U.S. Supreme Court’s law, a penalty given to the defendant should be proportional to the kind of crime committed. Contrary to this, the punishment will have violated the Eighth Amendment, which is against unusual and cruel punishment (U.S. Department of Justice 3).

The Supreme Court has to consider a number of factors in determining whether a death penalty is the appropriate penalty in the case. First, the court has to consider the gravity and severity of the penalty. Second, the court has to consider the jurisdiction under which other criminals are punished. Finally, the court has to consider the jurisdiction under which the same crime cases are punished. The defendant is granted a death sentence penalty in certain circumstances. First, in the event that he/she is charged guilty of a crime committed and capital sentence is the only legal authorized sanction. Second, if the defendant is found guilty of intentionally killing the victim. Finally, if the case presents several aggravating factors that feature in the statutory list, the defendant is eligible for a death sentence (U.S. Department of Justice 3).

The aggravating factors that necessitate a death penalty include the defendant having a prior record of criminal activities, which involve violent offenses. In addition, if the defendant has committed multiple killings of victims, or if he/she has caused danger to the lives of other people during the killing of...

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