Financial Inclusion

In: Business and Management

Submitted By priyankagaur2003
Words 10853
Pages 44
College of Agricultural Banking & Institute for Financial Management and Research Centre for Micro Finance

December 2008

Cost –Benefit and Usage Behaviour Analysis of No Frills Accounts: A Study Report on Cuddalore District

S. Thyagarajan Jayaram Venkatesan
S. Thyagarajan is a Member of Faculty at the College of Agricultural Banking, Reserve Bank of India, Pune (http://cab.org.in). Jayaram Venkatesan is a Research Consultant at the Centre for Microfinance (http://ifmr.ac.in/cmf/). The views expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors and do not in anyway reflect the views of the institutions with which they are associated.

S. Thyagarajan & Jayaram Venkatesan: Cost –Benefit & Usage Behaviour Analysis of No Frills Accounts

Contents
Acknowledgements............................................................................................................. 3 Executive Summary ............................................................................................................ 4 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 5 1. Literature Review............................................................................................................ 7 1.1 Notable Indian Initiatives.......................................................................................... 8 2: Financial Inclusion Project ........................................................................................... 12 2.1 Cuddalore District: A Profile .................................................................................. 12 3: Study Methodology....................................................................................................... 15 3.1 Financial Inclusion Project…...

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