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Fluid Mechanics

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Fluid Mechanics
Learning Objectives Outcomes
• Explain the pressure-depth relationship.
Pressure increases with depth.
• Define Pascal’s Principle.
Pascal's Principle states that the pressure is transmitted evenly through a liquid.
• Describe how to use Pascal’s Principle in practical application.
When you inflate a balloon with air, it expands evenly in all directions, this is an example.
• Describe Archimedes Principle.
States that the mass of a liquid displaced by a floating body is equal to the mass of that body.
• Determine if an object will float in a fluid based on its relative densities.
So if you fill a tumbler up with water to the brim, put an object into it, weigh the water that has been pushed out of the tumbler, and compare that with the weight of the object, you'll know whether it floats or not.
• Use the continuity equation and Bernoulli’s equation to explain common effects of ideal fluid flow.
The pressure in a fluid moving steadily without friction or outside energy input decreases when the fluid velocity increases
Assignment Requirements
3. Mass is the same, so if the whale is taking up less volume, the density must have increased. The whale has displaced a greater mass of water at the depth, so the buoyant force is greater.
20. Ice cubes float in water, and sink in alcohol. Anything with less density than the liquid that it's in will float.
22. It will increase
35. It would be harder on the top of a mountain because the pressure of the atmosphere is lower the higher you go. The atmospheric pressure pushes on the surface of the liquid when you suck which helps the liquid move up the straw. At sea level, the pressure is fourteen and a half pounds per square inch and reduces as you move higher.
43. When a steadily flowing gas flows from a larger diameter pipe to a smaller diameter pipe the speed of gas is decreases and pressure become increases and the spacing between the streamlines less and the streamlines comes very close to other.

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