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Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014
This is an exciting time to be associated with Brigham Young University-Idaho as it continues on a steady, upward course of academic innovation. Dedicated administrators and faculty members are continually working to prepare students to be well educated academically as well as spiritually. One of the university’s academic developments is our general education program called Foundations. Just as the name suggests, Foundations is designed to provide a strong base for the rest of your university experience and throughout your life. Foundations presents a focused approach to general education, allowing students to explore specific aspects of diverse subjects, delving deep into each topic. The courses are interdisciplinary and have been created through countless hours of faculty collaboration to provide you with the most effective learning outcomes. Foundations courses are divided into five groups: Eternal Truths, Academic Fundamentals, Science, Cultural Awareness, and Connections. While some courses are required, others are left to personal preference. You will be blessed as you enter these inspired classes with an open mind and willing heart. I invite you to carefully review the Foundations courses available and determine which classes will benefit you most. I wish you success in this and every other endeavor here at BYU-Idaho. Best regards,

Kim B. Clark President, Brigham Young University-Idaho

47

Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014 Foundations Requirements for Eternal Truths, FDREL 325 Doctrine and Covenants (2:2:0)

Academic Fundamentals, Science, Cultural Awareness and Connections:

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the history, content and teachings of sections 77 through Declaration 2. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Eternal Truths:
There are 14 credits required in the Eternal Truths area of your Foundations experience. Students will be required to take 4 credits in the Book of Mormon courses, 2 credits in the Family Foundations course, 4 credits in scripture-based courses, and 4 elective credits where students can select religion courses of their choice. The following courses will meet the Eternal Truths requirements:

FDREL 327 Pearl of Great Price

(2:2:0)

A brief survey of the background of the Pearl of Great Price with an emphasis on principles and doctrines taught therein. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Students will take an additional 4 credits of any courses in the Religious Education Department.
FDREL 100 Introduction to Mormonism (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: For individuals of other faiths and new members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A fundamental course concerning the doctrines, history and organization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This class is for those individuals belonging to religions other than The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and new members of the Church. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

All Students will take:
FDREL 121 Book of Mormon (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Required for graduation. A study of the origin, content and teachings of the Book of Mormon from 1st Nephi through Alma 29. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

And FDREL 122 Book of Mormon (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Required for graduation. A study of the content and teachings of the Book of Mormon from Alma 30 through Moroni. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 130 Missionary Preparation

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A course designed to help prepare students for missionary service, utilizing principles that reflect and supplement the emphasis taught in the “Preach My Gospel” missionary approach. This course is highly recommended for all pre-missionaries. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 150 Provident Living

(2:1:2)

All students will take:
FDREL 200 Family Foundations (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: Completion of 24 credits. A course that centers on “The Family: A Proclamation to the World” and develops gospel doctrines and principles pertaining to marriage and family life. Practical skills required to achieve and sustain provident living will also be demonstrated and practiced. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A course designed to assist students in applying gospel principles in their personal lives. It is composed of classroom instruction in doctrinal and temporal matters, coupled with a lab where principles of provident living are put into practice. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 190 Special Topics in Scripture

(1-3:0:0)

All students will take 4 credits of Scripture-based courses:
FDREL 211 New Testament (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as recorded in the four gospels. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 3 credits Prerequisite: By permission of Instructor only. For BYU-Idaho students facing special credit situations and for BYU–Idaho travel study students, taught in the term of the travel study, with topics selected which will focus on history, scripture, and culture of those lands visited. (Upon Request)

FDREL 215 Scripture Study Skills - The Power of the Word

(2:2:0)

FDREL 212 New Testament
Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the early church and epistles from Acts through Revelation. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A course designed to help students gain confidence in understanding the scriptures. The focus is on gaining skills for successful personal scripture study. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 234 Preparing for Eternal Marriage (2:2:0)

(2:2:0)

FDREL 301 Old Testament
Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the Old Testament from Genesis through 2 Samuel. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: For unmarried students. This class allows the student to examine the many different issues that lead to one’s being successfully sealed in the temple of the Lord. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 302 Old Testament
Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the Old Testament from 1 Kings through Malachi. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

(2:2:0)

FDREL 235 Building an Eternal Marriage

(2:2:0)

FDREL 324 Doctrine and Covenants
Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the history, content and teachings of sections 1 through 76. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: For married students. A study of the doctrines, principles and practices which will establish a successful, gospelcentered eternal marriage. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 261 Introduction to LDS Family History

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Introduction to the Family History program of the Church, which emphasizes identifying ancestors in the first few generations for whom temple ordinances have not been completed and the use of resources to simplify temple and family history activities. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

48
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
FDREL 333 Teachings of the Living Prophets Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014 (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. This course is concerned with the calling and function of the living prophets, with emphasis on principles taught in recent conference reports. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 341 Latter-day Saint History from 1805-1844

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the history, doctrine and development of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints up to and including the martyrdom of the prophet Joseph Smith. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 342 Latter-day Saint History from 1844 - 1901

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the history, doctrine and development of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints from the martyrdom of Joseph Smith through the administration of Lorenzo Snow. (Fall, Winter, Spring - Rotating)

FDREL 343 Latter-day Saint History from 1901 to Present

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the history, doctrine and development of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints from the administration of Joseph F. Smith to the present. (Fall, Winter, Spring - Rotating)

FDREL 351 The Gospel and World Religions

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of religions of the world such as Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism and Judaism. Designed to introduce members of the Church to the beliefs of other world faiths and their development with an emphasis on their relationship to the doctrines of the restored Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 352 The Gospel and Christian History

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the history and doctrines of Christianity from the Roman period through the early development of the Catholic and Orthodox churches, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, and up to modern times. Emphasis is placed upon principles and doctrines regained through the Restoration. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 390R Special Topics in Religion

(1-3:1-3:0)

Repeatable Course: may earn maximum of 2 credits Prerequisites: FDREL 121 or FDREL 121P; FDREL 122 or FDREL 122P; FDREL 200 Topical studies in religion based on teacher expertise. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 404 Writings of Isaiah
An indepth study of the history and writings of the Prophet Isaiah. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

(2:2:0)

FDREL 431 Doctrines of the Gospel

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. A study of the basic doctrines of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as taught in the scriptures and by Latter-day prophets. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 471 Methods of Teaching Seminary

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. This course helps students become more effective teachers. It prepares students to teach the scriptures and provides them with several teaching experiences, both in class and in a seminary setting. During the course, students are evaluated and screened for Religion 475. Students will observe at least 2-3 classes and teach 5-8 hours in released time seminary. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDREL 475 Seminary Teaching Seminar

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDREL 471 and Instructors consent. For prospective Seminary teachers only. This course deals with current teaching issues and needs. Trainees are also employed part-time and may teach from one to three classes of seminary each day. Trainees are evaluated to determine whether they should be considered for a full-time seminary teaching position. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

49
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations

Academic Fundamentals

Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014 FDMAT 108T Math for the Real World Test

(1:0:0)

In Academic Fundamentals there are three areas: reading and writing, advanced writing and critical reading, and quantitative reasoning. All students will take the same course in both the reading and writing and advanced reading and writing areas, but there are several options in the quantitative reasoning area that students will be able to choose from. The following courses will meet the Academic Fundamentals requirements:

All students will take the Writing and Reasoning Foundations course:
FDENG 101 Writing and Reasoning Foundations (3:3:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisites: Students must have an ACT English score of at least 16 or an SAT English score of 400 or ENG 106 with a B or ENG 109 with a B Emphasizes critical thinking and effective written and oral communication within academic and social contexts. Examines contemporary arguments in audio/video, Internet, and print media. Introduces critical reading strategies, the writing process, research, and documentation. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of one of the following foundations courses: FDMAT 110, FDMAT 112, Math 109, Math 111, Math 113, Math 114, Math 119, Math 215, or Econ 215. This pass/fail online-based course allows students who have already had a Foundations mathematics course, to explore the contemporary topics of finance math, linear and exponential modeling, probability, and statistical reasoning. It will satisfy the BYU-Idaho Foundations quantitative reasoning requirement and contains the most vital topics of the traditional 3.0-credit FDMAT 108. Completion of the course includes passing both a financial mathematics exam and statistical reasoning exam along with a financial life-planning spreadsheet project. Students may take FDMAT 108T one time only. Failure of FDMAT 108T would require the students to take the traditional 3.0 credit FDMAT 108 course to complete the Foundations quantitative reasoning requirement. (Fall,Winter, Spring)

All students will take the Advanced Writing and Critical Thinking course:
FDENG 201 Advanced Writing and Critical Thinking (3:3:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDENG 101 and at least 22 credits Help students learn how to reason carefully and express ideas clearly. Students develop these competencies as they learn to recognize strong arguments, uncover assumptions, evaluate evidence, recognize rhetorical patterns, and infer ideas from data. To apply their understanding of these skills, students write summaries, essays synthesizing ideas from diverse sources, critiques of arguments, and research papers that focus on issues relevant to their majors. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

All students will fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Requirement:
Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement
There are two ways to fulfill the Foundations Quantitative Reasoning graduation requirement: 1) Pass FDMAT 108 or 2) Pass any math class which indicates that it “fulfills the Foundations math requirement” (FDMAT 110, FDMAT 112, Math 109, Math 113, Math 215, or Econ 215) and then complete FDMAT 108T. Please note that passing a math class other than FDMAT 108 will not fulfill the Foundations graduation requirement. You must also complete FDMAT 108T.

FDMAT 108 Mathematical Tools for the Real World

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisites: Students must have an ACT Math score of at least 18 or an SAT math score of 430 or ALEK test score of 120 or MATH 100B with a B or MATH 101 with a B or MATH 100G with a B. This class prepares students to understand, analyze, and solve real-life problems that require quantitative reasoning. Topics include the meaning of probabilities, how to read, critique, and apply statistical information found in news reports, public policy debates, consumer reports, and other daily life and professional situations; the use of mathematical models in describing, understanding, and making predictions about real world phenomena; and the mathematics of loans and investments. Other topics may be included as time permits. All topics will be illustrated by examples and applications from current events, daily life, business, and natural phenomena. (Fall, Winter Spring)

50
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014 FDSCI 204 The American Epidemic: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Science Disease All students will have the opportunity to take the Science
Foundations course where they will explore the fundamentals of scientific thinking and reasoning. Following this course students will be able to choose 2 additional multi-disciplinary courses for a minimum of 5 credits that cover a range of subjects. The following courses will meet the Science Foundations requirements:

(3:3:0)

All students will take the Science Foundations course:
FDSCI 101 Science Foundations (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. An introduction to the nature, practice, power, and limitations of science, as well as relationships between science and religion, and science and society. These topics are explored through the study of selected episodes of scientific discovery that demonstrate methodical and creative aspects of scientific inquiry, and the self-correcting nature of science. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. Cardiovascular disease and Diabetes are leading causes of death and morbidity in the U.S. Both of these diseases are highly correlated with lifestyle choices. In this course students will study the physiologic mechanisms associated with these diseases as well as how lifestyle choices influence the diseases. Students will be expected to develop and implement personal programs to facilitate life-long health and wellness. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDSCI 205 Understanding DNA and Related Health Issues and Technologies

(3:3:0)

Students will choose 2 options from the following Issues in the Sciences courses for a minimum of 5 credits:
FDSCI 200 Energy in the 21st Century (3:3:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. 1. Develop and demonstrate an understanding of the scientific principles and technical issues relating to energy production and use, including fossil fuel-based and renewable technologies. 2. Increase quantitative reasoning skills in the context of energy. 3. Develop and demonstrate an understanding of the socio-economic impacts of energy related decisions. 4. Instill an awareness of stewardship responsibilities as they relate to energy issues, and identify actions that individuals and communities can take to address energy issues. 5. Develop and demonstrate skills in critical thinking and communication. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. The structure of DNA stands as one of the greatest discoveries of the 20th century and has led to multi-billion dollar advancements in medicine and agriculture. An understanding of DNA and its applications is necessary to distinguish fact from fiction, make informed decisions, and take full advantage of emerging DNA technologies. This course presents the fundamental concepts related to DNA including its history, structure, function, regulation, and inheritance. The remaining course material explores multiple issues and topics that are founded in DNA technology. These include the causes and treatments associated with genetic disorders and cancer, the creation of genetically modified foods, identification through DNA fingerprinting, tracing of family lineages, the applications and ethics of cloning and stem cell technology, and the underlying mechanism of organic evolution. Course methods include lecture, discussion, and handson exercises related to the subject material. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDSCI 206 Light & Sound: The Science of Vision & Hearing

(3:3:0)

FDSCI 201 Natural Disasters: Man and the Dynamic Earth

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. This course covers the physical characteristics of light and sound, the biological nature of eyes and ears, and the sensation of vision and hearing through our brain’s perceptual abilities. Students will evaluate the influence of music, movies, advertising, and video games on the human mind and behavior. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Fee: $15.00 Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. Examine the causes and consequences of natural hazards including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and coastal hazards. Students work in a team environment and examine case studies of ancient and modern events, emphasizing effects on science, engineering, history, economics, politics, and the arts. Study lessons learned from past events and determine what is being done or should be done to mitigate future disasters. Class includes a field trip. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDSCI 207 Origins of the Universe, Earth and Life

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. An investigation into the origins, change, and demise of physical and biological systems, including star systems, biological communities, and human civilizations. This course will draw connections among seemingly disparate topics such as the life and death of stars, the origination and extinction of species, and the rise and fall of human civilizations. Emphasis is placed on scientific reasoning and discovery. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDSCI 202 Issues in Global Climate Change

(2:2:0)

FDSCI 299 Topics in Interdisciplinary Science

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. This course provides an introduction to the science of global climate change with an emphasis on understanding the patterns, processes, and factors that contribute to global warming. Topics include the science of weather and climate, the carbon cycle, climate change through geologic time, climate change impacts on human history, natural and human influences on climate change including causes and solutions, and the economics and politics of climate change. This course establishes a foundation for students to understand global climate change and its effects on human, plant, and animal populations, as well as the social, economic, and political consequences involved. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Total Course Fees: $15.00 Special Topics in Science Foundations. Students will study a topic dealing with a scientific issue. The topic is determined by a faculty team and approved by the Foundations office. This course counts toward the 200-level Science requirement.

FDSCI 203 Environmental Stewardship

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDSCI 101, FDENG 101, Foundations Math Requirement. The purpose of this class is to show the effects that population can have on a local, regional, and global scale. The focus will be on how individually and collectively we impact the quality of our environment and human living conditions for both good and bad. Case studies will be used to examine an array of ecological, biological, agricultural, technological, socio-economic, political and other issues associated with human population trends. Students will receive a foundation whereby they can make informed choices about their lives, families and community and be better stewards of Earth’s resources. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

51
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations

Cultural Awareness

Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014 FDCA 204 Art and Propaganda in the 20th Century (3:3:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement This course will focus on the use of propaganda and other forms of persuasive argument in the arts during the 20th Century. Students will experience this topic through the various cultural influences including the visual, performing and literary arts. Emphasizes the development of aesthetic judgment. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

All students will take the American Foundations course to obtain a firm understanding of those things that define America and the American experience. Additionally, students will be able to choose from 2 different options. The first option includes taking the 3-credit Cultural Awareness course (FDCA 101) and a 2-credit Cultural Awareness course. The second option is to take the 2-course World Foundations sequence. The following courses will meet the Cultural Awareness Foundations requirements:

FDCA 205 China

(2:2:0)

All students will take the American Foundations course:
FDAMF 101 American Foundations (3:3:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Fundamental principles of the American constitution, the strengths of the free-market economy, and historical events that have shaped America’s political and economic heritage. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101. The rise of China as a major player on the international stage over the past few decades has been breathtaking. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to some of the key challenges which face China today through the study and analysis of topics such as population, politics, geography, economics, culture and the environment. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDCA 206 Great Books of the World

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101. A study of great books from ancient times to the early 20th Century. A deep reading of literary masterpieces in a variety of cultural, aesthetic, and historical contexts. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDCA 299 Topics in Cultural Awareness

(2:2:0)

Students will choose from Option 1 or Option 2: Option 1 Students will take this Cultural Awareness course:
FDCA 101 Foundations of Humanities (3:3:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Introduction to the Humanities. Students will examine key works of art, literature, cinema, and music of the past 500 years, their historical and cultural context, and the principles that make them great. Students will then apply these principles in their own creative work, and in making value assessments about works of art. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101. Special Topics in Cultural Awareness. Students will study a topic dealing with some aspect of international studies or the humanities. The topic is determined by a faculty team and approved by the Foundations office. This course fills the 200-level Foundations of Cultural Awareness requirement. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

OR Option 2 Students will take the following World Foundations courses:
FDWLD 101 World Foundations 1 (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101. The first half of a two-course sequence that examines great world civilizations through literature, art, music, philosophy, and history. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

AND Students will choose one of the following Cultural Awareness courses:
FDCA 201 Global Hotspot: Pakistan at the Crossroads of Conflict (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101. Few countries in the world are more strategically critical yet less understood than Pakistan. This young country in an ancient land lies at the crossroads of history, religion, language, and culture. On the front-line in the war against terror, this nuclear power is in the midst of political turmoil whose outcome will have great implications for the rest of the world. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDWLD 201 World Foundations 2

(3:3:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDWLD 101. The second half of a two-course sequence that examines great world civilizations through literature, art, music, philosophy, and history. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDCA 202 The Developing World

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101. This two-credit interdisciplinary course will address the challenges to modernization faced by developing nations in an increasingly globalizing world. Emphasis will be given to studying and analyzing issues such as geography and natural resources, history, culture, economic policies, poverty, education, politics, government, environmental sustainability, and other issues related to a basic understanding of the complexities of the vast majority of the world’s population. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

FDCA 203 The Middle East

(2:2:0)

Fulfills Foundations requirement. Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 101. Students will explore the conflicts in the Middle East through the tools of geography, economics, political science, sociology, religion, and historical analysis. Students will gain a more balanced view of the conflict by understanding it from multiple perspectives. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

52
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014

Connections
This course will pull together items from each of their Foundations courses in a culminating experience that will help students to exercise analytical thinking and moral judgements in case studies.

All students will take the Connections Foundations course:
FDCNC 350 Foundations Capstone: Analytical Thinking and Moral Judgment (2:2:0)
Fulfills Foundations requirement. Fee: $5.00 Prerequisite: FDAMF 101, FDENG 201, FDSCI 101, Foundations Math Requirement. Course Requirements: Student must have completed 70 credit hours. In this course students will learn how to make difficult decisions well. They will apply analytical thinking and moral judgment to problems with no easy solutions. Students will learn to identify important factors to consider, understand and articulate opposing viewpoints, analyze factual claims for accuracy, spot logical weaknesses in arguments, anticipate consequences of possible solutions, and think strategically. They will also discover how writing and preparing to present substantive positions can further sharpen their analytical skills. (Fall, Winter, Spring)

53
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)

Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014

Recommended Sequence for Foundations Courses:
As new students prepare to register for their first semester at BYU-Idaho, it is helpful for them to consider the following recommended sequence for their schedules. If students will follow this sequence they will get the most out of their time and take prerequisite Foundations courses early. In your planning, please refer to the course descriptions as found in this Foundations section to see the courses that are prerequisite and those that require a prerequisite. Please be aware that this is only a “recommended” sequence. Students should plan their schedules in a manner that best suits their declared major and individual needs; however, the student is ultimately responsible to make sure that all requirements are completed. Please refer to the suggested sequence of your major courses as outlined in this catalog and for further information to the applicable Satellite Advising Center as found on http://www.byui.edu/academic-discovery-center/about-us/locations

Students should complete the following courses during their first two semesters: Take these courses: FDENG 101 Writing and Reasoning Foundations FDSCI 101 Science Foundations FDAMF 101 American Foundations Take 1 Quantitative Reasoning course: Take this course: FDMAT 108 Mathematical Tools for the Real World OR Take 1 course: FDMAT 110 College Algebra FDMAT 112 Calculus I AND FDMAT 108T Test Out Take these courses: FDREL 121 Book of Mormon FDREL 122 Book of Mormon 3 2 3

Eternal Truths Students must take a total of 14 credits of religion courses to meet the graduation requirement. Take these required courses: FDREL 121* Book of Mormon FDREL 122* Book of Mormon FDREL 200 Family Foundations Take 2 scripture based courses from the following list: FDREL 211 New Testament FDREL 212 New Testament FDREL 301 Old Testament FDREL 302 Old Testament FDREL 324 Doctrine and Covenants FDREL 325 Doctrine and Covenants FDREL 327 Pearl of Great Price Take 2 additional course from the following courses: FDREL 100 Introduction to Mormonism FDREL 130 Missionary Preparation FDREL 215 Scripture Study Skills - The Power of the Word FDREL 234 Preparing for Eternal Marriage FDREL 235 Building an Eternal Marriage FDREL 261 Introduction to LDS Family History FDREL 333 Teachings of the Living Prophets FDREL 341 Latter-day Saint History from 1805-1844 FDREL 342 Latter-day Saint History from 1844 - 1901 FDREL 343 Latter-day Saint History from 1901 to Present FDREL 351 The Gospel and World Religions FDREL 352 The Gospel and Christian History FDREL 390R Special Topics in Religion FDREL 404 Writings of Isaiah FDREL 431 Doctrines of the Gospel FDREL 471 Methods of Teaching Seminary FDREL 475 Seminary Teaching Seminar *These courses should be taken during the first two semesters. 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1-3 2 2 2 2

3

3 4 1 2 2

The following courses may be taken upon completion of their prerequisites: (Please note FDCA 101 does not have any prerequisites.) Option 1: Humanities and International Take one course: FDCA 101 Foundations of Humanities AND Take one course: FDCA 201 Global Hotspot: Pakistan at the Crossroads Of Conflict FDCA 202 The Developing World FDCA 203 The Middle East FDCA 205 China FDCA 206 Great Books of the World FDCA 299 Topics in Interdisciplinary Cultural Awareness Take this course: FDENG 201 Advanced Writing and Critical Reading

3

2 2 2 2 2 2 3

Connections Take this course following the completion of all other Foundations courses: FDCNC 350 Foundations Capstone: Analytical Thinking and Moral Judgment 2

Take 2 courses: (Students must take a total of 5 credits of Issues in the Sciences)” FDSCI 200 Energy Issues and Alternatives 3 FDSCI 201 Natural Disasters: Man and the Dynamic Earth 3 FDSCI 202 Issues in Global Climate Change 2 FDSCI 203 Environmental Stewardship 2 FDSCI 204 The American Epidemic: Diabetes and Cardio-Vascular Disease 3 FDSCI 205 Understanding DNA and related Health Issues and Technologies 3 FDSCI 206 Light and Sound: The Science of Vision and Hearing 3 FDSCI 207 Origins of the Universe, Earth and Life 3 FDSCI 299 Topics in Interdisciplinary Science 3

54

Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014

Foundations Requirement Summary
Note: Students who complete specific modules of courses may substitute a module for up to 5 credits of Foundations. Approved substitutions are listed below.

Complete the following:

Complete the following:

Complete:

Complete a FDMAT class numbered higher than FDMAT 108 or Econ 215

Complete the following:

Complete 5 credits from the following list

Complete 8 credits from the following list:

Complete:

4 credits from the following list: 4 credits from the following list:

Complete the following:

Complete one of the following:

Complete the following:

Complete

Complete the following:

One of the following:

One of the following:

55

Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014

Foundations Requirements - Bachelors Degree
Eternal Truths 14 Credits Family Foundations AND 2
(Other Religion Courses)

Academic Fundamentals 9 Credits Reading & Writing

Science 7 Credits Scientific Foundations

Cultural Awareness 8 Credits American Foundations

Take this course:
FDREL 200 Book of Mormon

Take this course:
FDENG 101 3

Take this course:
FDSCI 101 2 Issues in the Sciences

Take this course:
FDAMF 101 3

Take 4 Credits Take these courses:
FDREL 121 FDREL 122 AND
(Scripture Based Courses)

2 2

Take 4 Credits
FDREL 211 FDREL 212 FDREL 301 FDREL 302 FDREL 324 FDREL 325 FDREL 327 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

FDREL 100 FDREL 130 FDREL 215 FDREL 234 FDREL 235 FDREL 261 FDREL 333 FDREL 341 FDREL 342 FDREL 343 FDREL 351 FDREL 352 FDREL 390R FDREL 404 FDREL 431 FDREL 471 FDREL 475

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Quantitative Reasoning

Take this course:
FDMAT 108 3

Take five credits:
FDSCI 200 FDSCI 201 FDSCI 202 FDSCI 203 FDSCI 204 FDSCI 205 FDSCI 206 FDSCI 207 FDSCI 299 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3

Option 1:
Cultural Awareness

Choose 1 option: Option 2:
World Foundations

OR
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 110 FDMAT 112 MATH 109 MATH 111 MATH 113 MATH 114 MATH 119 MATH 215 ECON 215 AND FDMAT 108T Advanced 1 3 4 5 2 3 4 4 4 4

Take this course:
FDCA 101 AND 3

Take these courses:
FDWLD 101 FDWLD 201 2 3

Take one course:
FDCA 201 FDCA 202 FDCA 203 FDCA 205 FDCA 206 FDCA 299 2 2 2 2 2 2

Take this course:
FDENG 201 3 2 Credits Analytical Thinking and Moral Judgment FDCNC 350 2

Connections

40 credits

Foundations Requirements - Associate's Degree
Eternal Truths 8 Credits Family Foundations AND 2
(Other Religion Courses)

Academic Fundamentals 9 Credits Reading & Writing

Science 7 Credits Scientific Foundations

Cultural Awareness 8 Credits American Foundations

Take this course:
FDREL 200 Book of Mormon

Take this course:
FDENG 101 3

Take this course:
FDSCI 101 2 Issues in the Sciences

Take this course:
FDAMF 101 3

Take 2 Credits: Take these courses:
FDREL 121 FDREL 122 2 2 FDREL 100 FDREL 130 FDREL 211 FDREL 212 FDREL 215 FDREL 234 FDREL 235 FDREL 261 FDREL 301 FDREL 302 FDREL 324 FDREL 325 FDREL 327 FDREL 333 FDREL 341 FDREL 342 FDREL 343 FDREL 351 FDREL 352 FDREL 390R FDREL 404 FDREL 431 FDREL 471 FDREL 475 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Quantitative Reasoning

Take this course:
FDMAT 108 3

Take five credits:
FDSCI 200 FDSCI 201 FDSCI 202 FDSCI 203 FDSCI 204 FDSCI 205 FDSCI 206 FDSCI 207 FDSCI 299 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 Cultural Awareness

Choose 1 option: Take this course:
FDCA 101 AND 3

Option 2:
World Foundations

OR
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 110 FDMAT 112 MATH 109 MATH 111 MATH 113 MATH 114 MATH 119 MATH 215 ECON 215 AND FDMAT 108T Advanced 1 3 4 5 2 3 4 4 4 4

Take these courses: Take one course:
FDCA 201 FDCA 202 FDCA 203 FDCA 205 FDCA 206 FDCA 299 2 2 2 2 2 2 FDWLD 101 FDWLD 201 2 3

Take this course:
FDENG 201 3

32 credits

56

Foundations
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014

Foundations Requirements - AAS Requirements
Eternal Truths 8 Credits AND Family Foundations Academic Fundamentals 9 Credits Reading & Writing 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Take this course:
FDREL 200 Book of Mormon 2

Take one course:
FDREL 100 FDREL 130 FDREL 211 FDREL 212 FDREL 215 FDREL 234 FDREL 235 FDREL 261 FDREL 301 FDREL 302 FDREL 324 FDREL 325 FDREL 327 FDREL 333 FDREL 341 FDREL 342 FDREL 343 FDREL 351 FDREL 352 FDREL 390R FDREL 404 FDREL 431 FDREL 471 FDREL 475

Take this course:
FDENG 101 3 Quantitative Reasoning

Take these courses:
FDREL 121 FDREL 122 2 2

Take this course:
FDMAT 108 3

OR
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 110 FDMAT 112 MATH 109 MATH 111 MATH 113 MATH 114 MATH 119 MATH 215 ECON 215 AND FDMAT 108T Advanced 1 3 4 5 2 3 4 4 4 4

Take this course:
FDENG 201 3

17 credits

57

Religion Requirements
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014

Eternal Truths: Religion Requirements
There is no degree, major, minor, concentration, or cluster offered in the Religious Education Department. To earn any degree offered by the University, the Religion Course requirements listed below must be completed. BACHELOR’S DEGREE: Fourteen (14) credit hours of religion at BYU–Idaho must include: • 4 credits Book of Mormon (121 and 122) • 2 credits Family Foundations (200) • 4 scripture-based credits (2-credit options include New Testament 211 or 212; Old Testament 301 or 302; Doctrine and Covenants 324 or 325; and Pearl of Great Price 327) • 4 additional credits of your choice from any courses offered for religion credit Adjusted religion requirements (Bachelor’s Degree) for students with transfer credits:
Total # of Transfer Credits 0-14.9 15-29.9 Religion hours Required Subject Matter: If the subject matter has been taken at an Institute or other Church school you may complete the to take from credit requirement by substituting other courses offered in Religious Education at BYU-Idaho until 14 credit hours are earned. BYU-Idaho 14 12 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; 4 credits scripture-based and 4 additional religion credits 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; 4 credits scripture-based; and 2 additional religion credits If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200, 4 credits of scripture-based courses, and 6 additional religion credits of your choice. 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; and 4 credits scripture-based 30-44.9 10 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200, 4 credits of scripture-based courses, and 4 additional religion credits of your choice. 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; and 2 credits scripture-based 45-59.9 8 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200, 4 credits of scripture-based courses, and 2 additional religion credits of your choice. 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200 60-74.9 6 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200 and 4 credits of scripture-based courses. 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200 75-89.9 4-6 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200 and 2 credits of scripture-based courses. 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200 90 or more 2-6 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE and APPLIED ASSOCIATE DEGREE: Eight (8) credit hours of religion at BYU–Idaho must include: • 4 credits Book of Mormon (121 and 122) • 2 credits Family Foundations (200) • 2 religion credits of your choice Adjusted religion requirements (Associate and Applied Associate Degrees) for students with transfer credits:
Total # of Transfer Credits 0-14.9 15-29.9 Religion hours Required Subject Matter: If the subject matter has been taken at an Institute or other Church school you may complete the to take from credit requirement by substituting other courses offered in Religious Education at BYU-Idaho until 8 credit hours are earned. BYU-Idaho 8 6 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122; 2 credits FDREL 200; and 2 credits of your choice 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200 and 4 credits of your choice. 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200 30-44.9 4-6 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200 and 2 credits of your choice. 4 credits FDREL 121 & 122 and 2 credits FDREL 200 45 or more 2-6 If Book of Mormon credits have been completed and transferred from an Institute or other Church school, complete FDREL 200.

58

Religion Requirements
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2013-2014
Transfer of Credit from other Universities and Institutes of Religion: Religion credit earned at Church Education System Institutes of Religion or other LDS Church schools will transfer to BYU-Idaho as an equivalent religion course or elective credit so long as the course is taken for credit and such credit is noted on an official transcript. While these religion credits from other LDS Church schools or Institutes of Religion may transfer to fulfill required religion content, they do not satisfy the BYU-Idaho resident religion requirement (religion courses taken from BYUIdaho). Coursework in religious studies from any place other than an LDS Church school or Institute of Religion will not be accepted toward filling the BYU-Idaho religion requirements. Second Religion Class: It is recommended that students take only one religion class each semester. No approvals are necessary for a student to enroll in a second religion class, but please be aware that the registration system will not allow registration for a second religion class prior to the first day of the term in which the student will take the class. Note particularly that this applies equally for 2nd Block classes (that is, they cannot be added until the first day of the 2nd Block). Students should take this into account when planning so that credit limits for scholarships or other financial aid can be met without the second religion class appearing on their registration before the first day of the term. Three or more religion classes in one semester require departmental approval. Such approval will only be granted in cases of extreme academic necessity. If you feel your situation qualifies, you may apply to the Religious Education Department Chair in Taylor 202. Attendance: Each instructor may establish criteria for giving credit, but generally, lack of attendance would affect a student’s grade detrimentally and could result in no credit for the class, thus requiring the student to retake the class. Waivers: Should a student be denied a graduation diploma from BYU–Idaho because the religion credit was not completed and reasons for the non-completion were beyond the control of the student, an appeal may be submitted for review. For clarification and/or application for a waiver, see the Religious Education Department Chair. Students can make an appointment with the Department Secretary at (208) 496-3920.

59

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