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Four Social Revolutions

In: Computers and Technology

Submitted By psychmaj15
Words 313
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The first social revolution is that of the hunting and gathering societies when the transformed to horticultural and pastoral societies. This kind of society enabled humans to stop moving around and make more permanent living areas. With dependable sources of food, human societies grew bigger, as well as the evolution of tools. This induced trade and set the stage for social inequality. Materialism brought about war. In return, wars brought about power and wealth. The second is the agricultural society. This kind of society emerged after the invention of the plow. The plow brought forth an even larger supply of food, which encouraged the evolvement of cities. People then had more time to engage in other activities such as philosophy, art, literature, and architecture. This period is typically known as the "dawn of civilization" because the changes are so abundant and profound. Social inequality increased. There were taxes and the elite surrounded themselves with what amounted to personal militaries. The third is the Industrial revolution that began in Great Britain. The steam machine was introduced to operate machinery. This tool opened the door for even bigger social inequality, more than any other ever seen. Those who first used the technology became very wealthy, and other peasants were made to leave their lands and had to move to the city, where they faced several hardships like starving, minimal wages, and stealing.
This revolution brought about better conditions once workers demanded it. There was improved housing, access to education, more varieties of food, and the average person's life span was longer than at any other period in human history. Monarchies and dictatorships also progressed to representative political systems. People received their voting rights, as well as to rights to be tried and cross-examine witnesses. In addition, women gained greater rights than before.
And the fourth is the microchip, which allows the service industries to

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