Frankenstein

In: English and Literature

Submitted By cnwalker30
Words 320
Pages 2
Frankenstein
When one makes a decision, the consequences of that decision can affect one for the rest of one’s life. When one makes a good decision, one will have good consequences. When one makes a bad decision, one will have bad consequences. In Frankenstein, a Gothic science fiction novel, written by Mary Shelley, Victor Frankenstein discovers the consequences of making bad decisions and how he must be responsible for his actions. He learns that even though his intentions were good, the outcomes were destructive.
The theme of good intentions can have destructive outcomes is expressed when Victor goes to Ingolstadt. While he is there, he studies alchemy and modern science. By studying science, he learns about life. He is fascinated by the secret of life and decides that he wants to create life from a dead body. He visits morgues for the necessary body parts for his scientific experiment. When he begins his scientific experiment, he neglects his health, family, friends, and schoolwork. When the scientific experiment is finished, the grotesque appearance of the monster horrifies Victor. He runs out of his apartment, leaving his eight-foot monster behind. While he is out, he runs into his best friend, Henry. Henry takes Victor back to his apartment. Because he was neglecting his health, he falls ill with a fever.
The theme of good intentions can have destructive outcomes is also expressed when the monster he created results in the destruction of everyone around him. When the hideous monster is rejected by society, he vows revenge on his creator.

Victor Frankenstein’s pursuit of knowledge leads him down a self-destructive path. His commitment to science and creating life from a dead body takes away some of his humanity. Without his humanity, he is left with the bad consequences of creating the monster. He did not think about the possibility of his scientific…...

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