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Freud, Neo-Freudians, and Post Freudians: a Comparison

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Freud, Neo-Freudians, and Post Freudians: A Comparison

PSY5102- History & Systems of Psychology

Sigmund Freud Free Association | When a patient is prompted to say whatever comes to mind | Sex determined neurosis | Freud reported that most of his female patients reported sexual abuse in their past. He also believed neurotic people did not have a normal sex life; therefore they went hand in hand. | Dream analysis | Dreams represent repressed desires | Oedipus complex | “This fear of the fatherand sexual attraction to the mother” (Schultz & & Schultz, 2012, p. 295). | Transference | was necessary in order to effectively help a patient with neurosis | Psychosexual Stages | “The developmental stages of childhood centering on erogenous zones” (Schultz & & Schultz, 2012, p. 312). |

Anna Freud- Leader of the neo-Freudian psychology The ego independent from the id | Freud believed the id, ego & superego went together. Could not have one without the other. | Ego Psychology | “became the primary American form of psychoanalysis from the 1940s to the early 1970s. One goal of the neo-Freudianswas to make psychoanalysis an accepted part of scientific psychology” (Schultz & & Schultz, 2012, p. 323). | Child Analysis | “developed an approach to psychoanalytic therapy with children that took into account their relative immaturity and the level of their verbal skills” (Schultz & & Schultz, 2012, p. 322). |

Melanie Klein- Object Relations Theorist- neo Freudian psychology Object relations theories focus on the interpersonal relationships with objects,Whereas… | Freud focused more on the instinctual drives themselves | Thus, object relations theorists emphasize the social and environmental influences on personality, particularly within the mother-child interaction. | Klein described the connection between…...

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