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Staying on Course
High School Curriculum Requirements for the University System of Georgia www.usg.edu/student_affairs The Office of Student Affairs

student-affairs@usg.edu

The high school curriculum is the cornerstone of the University System of Georgia (USG) admissions policy. This document reflects the

sdfdsfdsfsdfds unit requirements in each of the academic subject areas. Students should pursue a challenging and rigorous high school minimum USG

curriculum to be best prepared for a successful college experience and should consult with their high school counselor to determine appropriate coursework. The following high school requirements must be met by all freshmen applicants and transfer applicants with less than 30 transferable semester hours. Students should contact their college or university of interest to learn about any additional institution-specific admission requirements that may apply.

Carnegie Unit Requirements
16 Carnegie Units should be completed by students graduating high school prior to 2012.
17 Carnegie Units should be completed by students graduating high school in 2012 or later.
Carnegie Unit Requirement

In Specific Subject Areas

4 Carnegie units of college preparatory English

Literature (American, English, World) integrated with grammar, usage and advanced composition skills

4 Carnegie units of college preparatory mathematics Mathematics I, II, III and a fourth unit of mathematics from the approved list, or equivalent courses* or Algebra I and II, geometry and a fourth year of advanced math, or equivalent courses*

3 Carnegie units of college preparatory science for students graduating prior to 2012

Including at least one lab course from life sciences and one lab course from the physical sciences

4 Carnegie units of college preparatory science for students graduating 2012 or later

The four science units should include two courses with a laboratory component. Georgia public high school graduates should have at least one unit of biology, one unit of physical science or physics, one unit of chemistry, earth systems, environmental science, or an advanced placement course, and a fourth science.**

3 Carnegie units of college preparatory social science Must include one unit focusing on US studies and one unit focusing on world studies

2 Carnegie units of the same foreign language or
American Sign Language

Must be two units of the same foreign language (or
American Sign Language) emphasizing speaking, listening, reading and writing skills

* The list of courses that may be used to meet the four units of mathematics can be found on page 6 of this document.
** The list of courses that may be used to meet the fourth science requirement can be found on page 5 of this document.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
GENERAL
How many total academic units must I complete in order to be considered for regular admission to a
University System of Georgia (USG) college or university?
Students who graduated high school prior to 2012 must have completed a total of 16 academic units consisting of 4 English, 4 mathematics, 3 science, 3 social science and 2 foreign language. Students graduating in 2012 or later must complete a total of 17 academic units, consisting of 4 English, 4 mathematics, 4 science, 3 social science and 2 foreign language.
Should I pursue a challenging and rigorous high school curriculum?
Yes, in order to be best prepared for college, students are encouraged to take a challenging and rigorous high school curriculum. Students should consult with their high school counselor and parents to select courses suitable to their ability level in each subject area.
What else do colleges look for in addition to the completion of the high school curriculum?
While the rigor of the high school curriculum is very important, it is not the only factor considered when determining an applicant’s potential to succeed in college and eligibility for admission. The grade point average (GPA) in academic courses and standardized test results (SAT and ACT) are also considered.
Information regarding these requirements can be found online at https://secure.gacollege411.org/College_Planning/Prepare_for_College/Entrance_Requirements/USG_C ollege_Entrance_Requirements/_default.aspx. Some colleges also have additional requirements and admission requirements vary depending on the type of college and space available. Prospective students should check with the admission office for additional information.
I attend a private school or a public high school located outside of Georgia and my high school course titles do not match the course titles utilized by the Georgia Department of Education. How do
I know if my courses will satisfy the USG’s Required High School Curriculum (RHSC)?
The course titles and numbers listed in this document reflect those utilized by the Georgia Department of Education; however, USG colleges and universities will give consideration to similar courses taken by students attending a private school or public high school outside of Georgia. Additional information, such as course descriptions, may be requested by the college/university to help them evaluate a course to determine if it may be used towards satisfying the RHSC.
I will graduate from a Georgia public high school but will have participated in the Georgia
Alternative Assessment. Will I be eligible for admission to a University System of Georgia institution? Students graduating from a Georgia Public High School having participated in the Georgia Alternative
Assessment are not eligible for admission to a University System of Georgia institution.
SCIENCE
I will graduate high school in 2012 or later, how many science classes should I complete?
Students graduating high school in 2012 or later must complete a total of 4 units of science. The four sciences should include two courses with a laboratory component. Students graduating from a Georgia public high school should have at least one unit in biology, one unit of physical science or physics, one unit of chemistry, earth systems, environmental science, or an advanced placement course, and a fourth science from the list of courses found in this document.
My school or school system only offers physical science in the 8th grade, will I be considered deficient if I don’t take it in high school?
Students enrolled in Georgia private high schools and high schools in other states often complete physical science while in the eighth grade and then take three or more additional science units in high school. Consequently, students from private high schools and public high schools in other states can

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS count physical science courses taken in the eighth grade as one of the required four science units.
Georgia public high school students who take high school physical science while in middle school can also count that course provided their high school includes the credit for that high school course on their high school transcript.
I am graduating from a private high school or from an out-of-state public high school. Am I required to have four science courses?
Yes, students graduating from a private high school or an out-of-state public high school are required to complete four science units, including two courses with a laboratory component. At least one course should be from the life sciences and one course should be from the physical sciences.
My high school offers several science course options, each counting as a partial unit, which can count towards satisfying the fourth science unit required for high school graduation. Can courses counting as a partial unit be used to satisfy the fourth science unit of the Required High School
Curriculum (RHSC)?
Yes, students may take a combination of science courses to satisfy the fourth science unit provided the total credit earned equals a full unit.
The science courses offered at my high school include life science and physical science content in each course. Can these courses count towards the four required college preparatory science units?
Yes, provided the total content is equivalent to taking four units of science. The content must be the equivalent of two units with a laboratory component and should include the equivalent of at least one unit from the life sciences and one unit from the physical sciences.
I attend a Georgia public high school so why does my science course not appear on the approved course list found in this document? Does this mean it cannot be used to satisfy the Required High
School Curriculum (RHSC)?
Only those courses approved by the USG faculty review committee are included in this document and can be used to satisfy the RHSC. The list of courses that have not been approved can be found online at www.usg.edu/student_affairs/documents/USG_RHSC_Course_Review.pdf. FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Should I take a foreign language in high school?
While the Georgia Department of Education no longer requires students to complete two years of a foreign language for high school graduation, the University System of Georgia does require the completion of two years of the same foreign language or two years of sign language.
If I have taken a unit of foreign language in middle school, can it count towards satisfying the USG’s
RHSC?
Yes, foreign language units taken in middle school may count towards satisfying the USG’s RHSC.
Students who have taken foreign language in middle school should be sure to submit their transcript showing the credit earned.
MATHEMATICS
Which math classes should I take in high school?
Students on a discrete math curriculum should complete 4 units of math which should include Algebra I and II, geometry and a fourth year which should consist of advanced algebra and trigonometry, algebra
III, pre-calculus, discrete mathematics, calculus, statistics, IB mathematics or analysis, or equivalent courses. Students on an integrated math curriculum should complete 4 units of math, which should include Mathematics I, II, III and a fourth unit of math from the approved list found in this document, or equivalent courses. A list of sample math sequences can be found online at

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS www.usg.edu/student_affairs/documents/USG_RHSC_and_HS_Math_Sequencing.pdf. Students should keep in mind that not all sequences prepare students for admission to all USG institutions, particularly those with selective admissions, and may not be appropriate for students planning to enter into a STEM major in college. Students should contact their college or university for more information.
If I complete Mathematics I and II, Mathematics Support III and Mathematics III, but will not take a math course beyond Math III, will I be considered as having satisfied the USG’s RHSC in math?
In support of the Georgia Department of Education’s efforts to successfully implement new mathematics curriculum options across the state, the University System has agreed to consider students graduating in 2012, 2013 or 2014, and completing the following sequence of courses, to have satisfied the RHSC:
Mathematics I (or GPS Algebra)
Mathematics II (or GPS Geometry)
Mathematics Support III (or GPS Advanced Algebra Support)
Mathematics III (or GPS Advanced Algebra)
Students should keep in mind that the completion of the above sequence of courses may not prepare them for admission to all University System of Georgia colleges and universities, particularly those with selective admissions. In addition, the above sequence may not be appropriate for STEM majors.
Can Accelerated Mathematics courses count towards satisfying the USG’s Required High School
Curriculum (RHSC) in the area of Mathematics?
Yes, Accelerated Mathematics courses can count towards satisfying the RHSC. Students must complete through Mathematics III or Algebra II (or an equivalent course or higher) and take one additional unit of advanced mathematics from the approved list found in this document.
If I complete an accelerated integrated mathematics course (i.e. Accelerated Mathematics I) one year and an on-level integrated mathematics course (i.e. Mathematics II) the following year, will this count towards satisfying the University System of Georgia’s Required High School Curriculum
(RHSC) in the area of mathematics?
Yes, students who complete an Accelerated Mathematics course one year, and who take an on-level mathematics course the following year, may remain on-track for completing the USG’s RHSC provided they complete four total units of mathematics which includes through Mathematics III or Algebra II (or an equivalent course or higher) and one additional unit from the approved list found in this document. For example, a student completing Accelerated Mathematics I, Mathematics II, Mathematics
III and Mathematics IV would be considered as having completed the USG’s Required High School
Curriculum.
I’ve taken a math course but it does not appear on the list. Does that mean it cannot be used to satisfy the USG’s Required High School Curriculum (RHSC)?
The University System and the Georgia Department of Education work collaboratively to identify courses that may be used to satisfying the USG’s RHSC. Only those courses recommended by the USG faculty review committee are included on the Staying on Course document. The list of courses that have been reviewed but not approved is maintained by the Office of Student Affairs and can be found online at www.usg.edu/student_affairs/documents/USG_RHSC_Course_Review.pdf.

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COURSES THAT MAY BE USED TO SATISFY THE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT

26.01200
26.01300
26.01400
26.01500
26.01800
26.01900
26.03100
26.05100
26.06100
26.06110
26.06200
26.06300
26.06400
26.06500
26.07100
26.07200
26.07300
40.01100
40.02100
40.04100
40.05100
40.05200
40.05300
40.05500
40.05600
40.05900
40.06300
40.06400
40.07100
40.08100
40.08200
40.08300
40.08410
40.08420
40.08500
40.08600
40.08700
40.08900
40.09100
40.09200
40.09230
40.09240
40.09300
40.09400
40.09500
40.09600

ACADEMIC COURSES
Biology I (Grades 9-12)
Biology II (Grades 9-12)
Advanced Placement Biology
Genetics
International Baccalaureate Biology SL
International Baccalaureate Biology HL
Botany
Microbiology
Ecology
Environmental Science
Advanced Placement Environmental
Science
International Baccalaureate Environmental
Systems
Advanced Genetics/DNA Research
Epidemiology
Zoology
Entomology
Human Anatomy/Physiology
Physical Science
Astronomy
Meteorology
Chemistry I
Chemistry II
Advanced Placement Chemistry
International Baccalaureate Chemistry SL
International Baccalaureate Chemistry HL
Materials Chemistry
Geology
Earth Systems
Oceanography
Physics I
Physics II
Advanced Placement Physics B
Advanced Placement Physics C:
Mechanics
Advanced Placement Physics C:
Electricity and Magnetism
International Baccalaureate Physics SL
International Baccalaureate Physics HL
Environmental Physics
Advanced Physics Principles/Robotics
Advanced Scientific Internship
Advanced Scientific Research
Scientific Research III
Scientific Research IV
Forensic Science
Chemical & Material Science Engineering
International Baccalaureate
Design Technology SL
International Baccalaureate
Design Technology HL

Rev. 02/17/15

01.46100
02.42100
02.42200
02.44100
03.41100
03.45100
20.41810
20.41710
21.45100
21.45300
21.45700
25.44000
25.44600
25.56800
25.56900

CTAE COURSES
General Horticulture and Plant Science
Animal Science Technology/Biotechnology
Equine Science
Plant Science and Biotechnology
Natural Resources Management
Forest Science
Food Science
Food & Nutrition Through the Lifespan
Energy and Power Technology
Advanced AC and DC Circuits
Appropriate and Alternative Energy
Technologies
Essentials of Healthcare
Sports Medicine
Introduction to Biotechnology
Applications of Biotechnology

Other Acceptable Courses
11.01600

AP Computer Science A

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COURSES THAT MAY BE USED TO SATISFY THE MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT
27.04300
27.04600
27.05100
27.05220
27.05240
27.06100
27.06200
27.06210
27.06220
27.06230
27.06240
27.06300
27.06400
27.06500
27.06610
27.06700
27.06900
27.07100
27.07200
27.07300
27.07400
27.07700
27.07800
27.07910
27.07920
27.08000
27.08010
27.08020
27.08100
27.08200
27.08300
27.08400
27.08500
27.08600
27.08800
27.09100
27.09200
27.09300
27.09400
27.09500
27.09600
27.09710
27.09720
27.09730
27.09740
27.09750
27.09760
27.09770

GPS Advanced Algebra Support (2012, 2013 and 2014 graduates only)***
Mathematics Support III (2012, 2013 and 2014 graduates only)***
Statistics
International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematics Mathematical Methods
International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematical Studies SL
Algebra I
Informal Geometry
GPS Algebra
GPS Geometry
GPS Advanced Algebra
GPS Pre-Calculus
Euclidean Geometry
Algebra II
Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry
Algebra III
Analysis (Pre-Calculus)
Discrete Mathematics
Calculus (course number retired-current number is 27.078)
Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB
Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus BC
Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics
Multivariable Calculus
Calculus
College Statistics A
College Statistics B
Engineering Calculus
College Calculus A
College Calculus B
Mathematics I – Algebra/Geometry/Statistics
Mathematics II – Geometry/Algebra II/Statistics
Mathematics III – Advanced Algebra/Statistics
Mathematics IV – Pre-Calculus-Trigonometry/Statistics
Advanced Mathematical Decision Making
Mathematics of Industry and Government
Statistical Reasoning
Accelerated Mathematics I – Geometry/Algebra II/Statistics
Accelerated Mathematics II – Advanced Algebra/Geometry/Statistics
Accelerated Mathematics III – Pre-Calculus-Trigonometry/Statistics
Accelerated GPS Algebra/Geometry
Accelerated GPS Geometry/Advanced Algebra
Accelerated GPS Pre-Calculus
CCGPS Coordinate Algebra
CCGPS Analytic Geometry
CCGPS Advanced Algebra
CCGPS Pre-Calculus
Accelerated CCGPS Coordinate Algebra/Analytic Geometry A
Accelerated CCGPS Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra
Accelerated CCGPS Pre-Calculus

*** Courses may not prepare students for admission to all University System of Georgia colleges and universities, particularly those with selective admissions, and may not be appropriate for students planning to enter into a STEM major in college. Rev. 02/17/15

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COURSES THAT MAY BE USED TO SATISFY THE SOCIAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT
COURSES FOCUSING ON WORLD STUDIES
45.08110
Advanced Placement World History
45.08300
World History
45.07110
World Geography
45.07700
Advanced Placement Human Geography
COURSES FOCUSING ON U.S. STUDIES
45.08100
United States History
45.08200
Advanced Placement United States History
45.08700
International Baccalaureate History of the Americas SL (US History)
COURSES THAT MAY BE USED TO SATISFY THE THIRD UNIT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
In addition to any of the above, any of the following:
45.01100
Comparative Religions
45.01200
Current Issues
45.01300
Technology and Society
45.01310
International Baccalaureate Information Technology in a Global Society SL
45.01320
International Baccalaureate Information Technology in a Global Society HL
45.01400
The Humanities/Social Studies
45.01500
Psychology
45.01600
Advanced Placement Psychology
45.01700
International Baccalaureate Psychology
45.02100
Anthropology
45.03100
Sociology
45.03200
Ethnic Studies
45.05200
Advanced Placement Government/Politics: United States
45.05300
Advanced Placement Government/Politics: Comparative
45.05500
Constitutional Theory
45.05600
The Individual and Law
45.05700
American Government/Civics
45.05800
Ethics and the Law
45.06100
Economics/Business/Free Enterprise
45.06200
Advanced Placement Microeconomics
45.06300
Advanced Placement Macroeconomics
45.06400
Comparative Political/Economic Systems
45.06500
International Baccalaureate Economics SL
45.07200
Asian Studies
45.07300
Latin American Studies
45.07400
Middle Eastern Studies
45.07500
Sub-Saharan Studies
45.07600
Local Area Studies/Geography
45.07700
Advanced Placement Human Geography
45.07800
International Baccalaureate Geography SL
45.08120
U.S. History in Film
45.08400
Advanced Placement European History
45.08500
Georgia History
45.08600
Local Area Studies/History
45.08900
Modern U.S. Military History, 1918-present
45.08910
Early U.S. Military History
45.08920
Recent U.S. Presidents
45.8930
International Baccalaureate History of the Americas HL
45.09100
United States and World Affairs
45.09200
World Area Studies

Rev. 02/17/15

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COURSES THAT MAY BE USED TO SATISFY THE ENGLISH REQUIREMENT
23.03400
23.04300
23.05100
23.05200
23.05300
23.06100
23.06120
23.06130
23.06200
23.06300
23.06400
23.06500
23.06600
23.06700
23.06800
23.06900

Advanced Composition
Advanced Placement Language/Composition
American Literature/Composition
British Literature/Composition (previously English Literature/Composition)
Advanced Placement English Language and Composition/American Literature
Ninth Grade Literature and Composition
International Baccalaureate English B SL
International Baccalaureate English B HL
Tenth Grade Literature and Composition
World Literature/Composition
Literary Types/Composition
Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
Contemporary Literature/Composition
Multicultural Literature/Composition
International Baccalaureate English SL (American Literature)
International Baccalaureate English HL (World Literature)

Notes:
 All other AP and IB courses may be considered in the appropriate subject area.
 Courses designed for students in the Georgia Alternative Assessment are not considered (courses beginning with “Access”).
 Students who graduate from a Georgia public high school having participated in the Georgia Alternative Assessment will not be eligible for admission to a USG institution.
 Course titles and numbers listed in this document reflect those utilized by the Georgia Department of Education. Consideration should be given to similar courses for students attending private and out-of-state high schools.
Students should contact their college or university of interest to learn about any additional institution-specific admission requirements that may apply.
Please visit the “College Planning” tab of the GAcollege411.org website and click on “Explore Schools” to learn more about institution admission requirements and to view institution contact information. Questions regarding admission to a specific University System of
Georgia institution should be directed to the institution. General questions regarding this document may be directed to the University
System of Georgia’s Office of Student Affairs by emailing student-affairs@usg.edu or calling 404-962-3110.

Rev. 02/17/15

8|Page

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...approximately 760 mm Hg; i.e., the weight of a column of mercury measuring 1 mm2 and 760 mm tall. This equates to about 29.7 inches of mercury. If we reduce the pressure above the sample that we are heating, we can reduce the boiling point of the liquid. This is referred to as a vacuum distillation or carrying out a distillation in vacuo. For example, while water boils at 100oC (or 212° F) at 760 mm Hg, it boils around 22oC at 20 mm Hg. The boiling point of a liquid is a physical characteristic of a compound. Many factors go into the estimation of the boiling point of a liquid such as the shape (round, oval, elongated), the mass and most importantly, hydrogen bonding (H-bonding). Methane with a mass of 16 does not engage in H-bonding and is a gas at room temperature while water (mass 18) boils at 100oC. While we can often guess the relative boiling points of a series of compounds, it is rather difficult to calculate a boiling point based on first principals. Similarly,...

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