Gene Transfer of Antibiotic Resistant E. Coli

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The question of identity is complex, to be certain. Philosophical thinkers have been wrestling with the question for centuries. Such intellectual exercises have frequently been rooted in the idea that no matter the individual differences between us, we are the “same” because each of us is, at base, a human being. Using this as the basis for understanding our individual identities within the context of a civilized, democratic society, we should be able to co-exist harmoniously in a country founded on the following familiar words from the United States Declaration of Independence, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”
The reality of the situation, however, is arguably that white culture has interpreted these words to mean that anyone who identifies themselves as not white, either by some physical trait, or a set of ideologies that do not mirror the protestant values on which this country was founded, is essentially and innately substandard. As a result, they are marginalized and assigned a sub-par position within society. Certain groups are notable for the social and political resistance they begin to demonstrate against the white establishment. Two notable groups which have shown (and continue to show) such resistance are African-Americans and the LGBT community, significantly notable because both groups, while varying dramatically in some elements of their struggles, also dramatically parallel one another by virtue of the fact that both aim to have their human identity acknowledged and affirmed. This paper will discuss the significance of resistance as it applies to the acknowledgement and affirmation of a shared and immutable human identity.
In All Bright Court, Connie Porter gives us a…...

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