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General Thesis

In: Computers and Technology

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GARDEN CITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

THESIS TITLE
A PROJECT
Presented to the Department of Information and Communication Technology,
Garden City University College in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science
In

Computer Science

By
NAME1
NAME2

Month, Year
DECLARATION

I hereby declare that the entire thesis work entitled, “……………..” submitted to the department of Information and Communication Technology, Garden City University College, in fulfilment of the requirement for the award of the degree of BSc Computer Science, is a bonafide record of my own work carried out under the supervision of Mr/Mrs/Ms . ………..
I further declare that the thesis either in part or full, has not been submitted earlier by me or others for the award of any degree in any University.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This section contains expressions of gratitude to advisor(s) and anyone who helped you: 1. technically (including materials, supplies) 2. intellectually (assistance, advice) 3. financially (for example, departmental support, travel grants)

ABSTRACT

The abstract is an important component of your thesis. Presented at the beginning of the thesis, it is likely the first substantive description of your work read by an external examiner. The abstract is the last section to write. An abstract is not merely an introduction in the sense of a preface, preamble, or advance organizer that prepares the reader for the thesis. In addition to that function, it must be capable of substituting for the whole thesis when there is insufficient time and space for the full text.
To preserve visual coherence, you may wish to limit the abstract for your doctoral dissertation to one double-spaced page.

Points to note:
Length should be ~ 1-2 paragraphs, approx. 400 words.
Abstracts generally do not have citations.
Information in title should not be repeated.
Be explicit.
Use numbers where appropriate.
Answers to these questions should be found in the abstract: * What did you do? * Why did you do it? * How did you do it? * What did you learn? State major results. * Why does it matter? Point out at least one significant implication.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................... vii
LIST OF FIGURES ....................................................................................................... viii

Chapter
I. TITLE OF CHAPTER ONE.................................................................................1
Subheading...................................................................................................6
Subheading...................................................................................................10
II. TITLE OF CHAPTER TWO...............................................................................17
Subheading...................................................................................................24
Subheading...................................................................................................33
III. TITLE OF CHAPTER THREE .........................................................................60
Subheading...................................................................................................71
Subheading...................................................................................................80
IV. TITLE OF CHAPTER FOUR...........................................................................92
A very long subheading, such as this one, should be divided on to two lines and single-spaced................................................................107
Subheading..................................................................................................123
V. TITLE OF CHAPTER FIVE .............................................................................143
Subheading..................................................................................................154
Subheading..................................................................................................179
VI. TITLE OF CHAPTER SIX...............................................................................196
Subheading........................................................................................................201
Subheading.......................................................................................................232
Subheading.......................................................................................................251
APPENDICES ......................................................................................................266
REFERENCES ......................................................................................................271

LIST OF FIGURES Figure | Page | 1.1 Login Form…………………………………………………………………………… | 2 | 1.2 System Setup…………………………………………………………………………. | 8 | 2.1 Payroll Report………………………………………………………………………… | 9 |

LIST OF TABLES Table | Page | 1.1 User groups…………………………………………………………………………… | 8 | 5.1 Development Frameworks……………………………………………………………. | 45 | | |

CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION

1.1 INTRODUCTION
Provide a short overview or introduction of the research in this section.

1.2 BACKGROUND AND HISTORY
The background and history highlights empirical foundations of research. The purpose of a background/history section is to give the reader the relevant facts about the topic and/or research site so that they understand the material or case in the research.

1.3 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
Logically, the first step in any research is to provide a clear statement of the problem. This step is indispensable in the writing process in that it governs the organization and flow of the thesis. The purpose statement should provide a synopsis of the purpose of the study.

1.4 JUSTIFICATION OF THE PROBLEM
In stating the problem, it is also necessary to specify why it is important and what new insights may be found. What would be its net contribution to the body of knowledge in the field, and/or towards solving the problems humanity at large?

1.5 AIMS OF RESEARCH
Aims of the research must be stated here. These need to be deduced from the problem statement. It is a good practice to bullet all the aims. This makes it easier to match the objectives of the research to the aims.

1.6 OBJECTIVES OF RESEARCH
Objectives of the research define how the aims are going to be realised. In Computer Science and related disciplines they define what experimental results, programs, computations and mathematical proofs that might be used to satisfy the aims. In general, it is possible to categorise objectives as general or specific.

1.7 SCOPE AND LIMITATION OF THE RESEARCH WORK
State the areas your research will cover and/or not cover.

1.8 PROPOSED CHAPTER OUTLINE
Research thesis also contain tentative chapter outline. It indicates the number of chapters the thesis or dissertation is expected to be composed of. It gives the tentative chapter headings with brief annotations of expected chapter content.

CHAPTER TWO LITERATURE REVIEW

A review of relevant literature is the third step and is of great significance. The literature review helps relate the proposed study to the larger ongoing discourse in the literature about a phenomenon, filling in gaps in the literature and extending earlier studies. The literature review is neither a chronological summary of related works nor a mere catalogue of previous studies published in the field. Literature review is a well-organized critical appreciation of related and relevant literature conceptually integrated within the logic of the proposed investigation. The student should show whether other researchers have studied the same or similar problems before, from what perspectives have these studies been conducted, and whether these researches have been theoretically or empirically adequate.

Essentially, this part of your thesis document will form the bulk of your citations [Refer to part two for the Harvard referencing system guide]. The literature review should reference only publicly available material. The purpose of this section is to illuminate the area of research not to reference “magic documents” that are impossible to find.
This section also helps guide the reader through the rest of your thesis in the sense that it provides direction as to what bodies of knowledge you used in support of your thesis statement.

CHAPTER THREE
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

The methods or methodology section is undeniably the heart of the research proposal. In software and web development research projects, this section normally includes three main areas: data collection procedures, software development methodology and development tools and platform.

3.1 Data Collection
When conducting field studies it is important to obtain accurate and reliable information about the phenomenon under study. Most common approaches for application development studies include Inquisitive techniques (interviews, questionnaires, Brainstorming and Focus Groups) and Observational techniques (Work Diaries, Participant Observation). In this section, indicate the data collection method(s) used and explain its impact on the research.

3.2 Software development methodology
A software development methodology or system development methodology in software engineering is a framework that is used to structure, plan, and control the process of developing an information system. Common methodologies include waterfall, prototyping, incremental development, spiral development, rapid application development, and extreme programming.
This section should explain your choice of software development methodology highlighting reasons for the choice and how the methodology was used to achieve the set research objectives.

3.3 Development tools and platform
This section should indicate all tools, programming languages, IDEs, frameworks and platforms to be used in the development process. Justify your choice for the tool or platform.

CHAPTER FOUR
SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS SPECIFICATIONS

A requirements specification for a software system, is a complete description of the behaviour of a system to be developed and may include a set of use cases that describe interactions the users will have with the software. In addition, it also contains non-functional requirements.

4.1 Functional Requirements
Functional requirements define a function of a system or its component. A function is described as a set of inputs, the behaviour, and outputs. Example: A system may be required to present the user with a display of the number of records in a database.

Below is an example of the functional requirements of a student self service.
Student can make changes to his/her courses that are about to be taken for a semester in the future. All system (browser) interfaces are based ISO accepted industry standards for the WWW. Among others the online registration system will have the following functionalities:
Personal Profile Student Address Student Authentication/Change PIN Email/Fax Address Stops
Registration
Registration Status Course Status Student’s Current Schedule Register for a course Add or drop a course Course Evaluation Guide Registration Schedule
Grades
View past grades earned from each course taken up to the last completed semester. View and Print non-official records of grades Keep a cumulative count of credits finished Display a computed value of current GPA Registration Assistance
Stop a registration request course for error conditions: Courses have scheduling conflict Course does not exist Course requires a prerequisite that is not met Course has already been registered and or completed

4.2 Use Cases
Each use case illustrates behavioural scenarios through one or more functional requirements.

4.3 Non Functional Requirements
A non-functional requirement is a requirement that specifies criteria that can be used to judge the operation of a system, rather than specific behaviours. Sufficient network bandwidth may be a non-functional requirement of a system. Others include performance requirements, security, or reliability. Sufficient network bandwidth may be a non-functional requirement of a system.

CHAPTER FIVE
SYSTEM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION

5.1 System Architectural Design This is a high-level overview of the anticipated system architecture . o Showing the distribution of functions across system modules. o Identifying the overall structure of the system, the principal components (sub-systems, modules), their relationships and how they are distributed.

5.2 Database Design
Design the system data structures and how these are to be represented in a database. Explain how data integrity is ensured by your design [ensure that the database is fully normalised]. Depict the design using entity relationship diagrams.

5.3 User Interface Design
Describe the characteristics of each interface between the product and its users (e.g., screen formats/organization, report layouts, menu structures, error and other messages, or function keys).

CHAPTER SIX
CONCLUSION
6.1 Summary
This section allows you to explain to the reader all conclusions that can be drawn from evidence that you have presented in previous sections. In addition, you should again present your contributions and make reference to how you validated them in your thesis.
 If you met the reader at a meeting six months from now, what do you want them to remember about your research work?
 Refer back to problem posed, and describe the conclusions that you reached from carrying out this project, summarize new observations, new interpretations, and new insights that have resulted from the present work.
 Include the broader implications of your results.

6.2 Challenges
Express challenges faced in the carrying out of the research. Should not be more than 10 sentences.

6.3 Recommendation and Future work
Finally, it is very important that you present a roadmap for continuing the research you have reported. You should present all questions that you did not address in you work and discuss why they are significant.

REFERENCES

All of the sources you referred to in the main body need to be listed in this section.
References are a way to acknowledge that work and to let the reader know which ideas are yours and which belong to someone else. Plagiarism involves two kinds of wrongs. Using another person’s ideas, information, or expressions without acknowledging that person’s work constitutes intellectual theft. Passing off another person’s ideas, information, or expressions as your own to get a better grade or gain some other advantage constitutes fraud.

Reference should be left justified.
List all references cited in the text in alphabetical order
Refer to Part two of the BSc Honours Thesis format for information on Harvard Style referencing format

APPENDIX A
Glossary

Define the technical terms used in the document
You should not make assumptions about the experience or expertise of the reader

APPENDIX B
User Manual

APPENDIX C
Sample Code

Include about two pages of integral code used in the development of the project.

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